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MEDFIELD 

344th Annual Report of the Town Officers 



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1994 



The cover portrays the Medfield lap robe designed by local 
resident Seddon Ryan Wylde, noted graphic artist and weaver, 
for the benefit of the Memorial Public Library Gift Fund. 
This intricately woven robe offers a visual history of the 
town and includes historical buildings along with significant 
symbols and traditional images associated with Medfield. 

The lap robe may be purchased at the Memorial Public Library. 



344th Anniversary 




ANNUAL REPORT 



of the 



TOWN OFFICERS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1994 




THE 1994 ANNUAL TOWN REPORT IS DEDICATED TO 



ATTORNEY RALPH C. GOOD, JR. 



The 1994 Annual Town Report is dedicated to Attorney Ralph C. 
Good, Jr. with deep appreciation for over twenty years years 
of exemplary service to Medfield. Ralph generously and 
effectively shared his professional knowledge and skills on 
town boards and committees, including the Zoning Board of 
Appeals, Warrant Committee, Council on Aging, and Bicentennial 
Committee. Additionally, he brought wit, effort, and a warm 
and giving personality to a wide range of community activities 
and was involved in the Little League as Umpire in Chief and 
Coach and Medfield Youth Hockey as a Member of the Board of 
Directors. In his professional capacity of Attorney, Ralph 
assisted many Medfield citizens in their need without 
compensation. The Town is most grateful to him for the 
exceptional contribution he made by his example of service, 
integrity and dedication to his family, church and the 
Medfield community. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreports1994medf 



INMEMORIAM 



PAUL CURRAN 

Veterans's Director Agent - Burial Agent - 1972-1994 

Memorial Day Committee - 1967-1994 

Vietnam Honor Roll Advisory Committee - 1967 

Committee to Study Memorials 

Home Committee 



FREDERICK D. HARRISON 
Conservation Commission - 1976-1979 



JAMES T. KASHALENA 
Civil Defense Officer -1965-1972 
Special Police Officer -1968-1972 



ROBERT A KREGER 
Special Police Officer -1960-1972 
Civil Defense Officer -1965-1972 



MARY MAIRETIENNE 

Board of Registrars - 1948 

Police Matrons - 1957 



MARTHA WELCH 

Board of Health- 1942 

School Nurse 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 

Population as of January 1, 1994 11, 02 J 

Assessed Valuation 1994 $792, 145,500.00 

Tax Rate 7/1/93 - 6/30/94 $ 15.40 

7/1/94 - 6/30/95 $ 14.28 

Area 14.43 Square Miles 

Miles of highway 70. 84 

Elevation at Town Hall approximately 180 feet above sea level 
Medfield is in the following Voting Districts: 

9th District John J. Moakley 

Representative to Congress World Trade Center, Suite 220, Commonwealth Pier 

Boston, MA 02210 

2nd District Michael M. Murphy 

Governor's Councillor 8 Flintlocke Lane 

Canton, MA 02021 

Norfolk, Bristol & Plymouth District William R. Keating 

Senator in General Court Massachusetts Senate 

State House - Room 504 
Boston, MA 02133 

13th Norfolk District Lida Harkins 

Representative in General Court House of Representatives 

Prec. 1 & 4 State House - Room 38 

Boston, MA 02133 

12th Norfolk District Prec. 2 & 3 John. H. Rogers 

Representative In General Court House of Representatives 

State House - Room 36 
Boston, MA 02133 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Edward M. Kennedy 

United State Senators 2400 JFK. Federal Building 

Boston, MA 02203 

Number of Registered Voters as of December 3 1, 1994: John Kerry 

Democrats 1148 1 Bowdoin Square, 10th Floor 

Republicans 1183 Boston, MA 02114 

No Party or Designation 4352 
Others 5 

TOTAL 6688 



6 



1994 ELECTED TOWN OFFICERS 



MODERATOR 



Ralph C. Copeland 



Nancy J. Preston 



Ann B. Thompson 
Tidal B. Henry 
John T. Harney 



TOWN CLERK 



SELECTMEN 



Term. Expires 

1995 
1997 



1995 
1996 
1997 



ASSESSORS 



Clara E. Doub 
Carole A. Rossi 
William D. Walsh 



1995 
1996 
1997 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Mark F. Wilson 
Fayre C. Stephenson 
Clarence A. Purvis 
Sharon K. Semeraro 
William A. Tosches 



1995 
1995 
1996 
1996 
1997 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



James C. Baughman, resigned 

Richard M. Fitzpatrick, resigned 

Jane Partis McCarthy, appt. to fill resig, 

Willis H. Pelligian 

Maura Y. McNicholas 

Elizabeth J. Kozel 

Jo-Anne L. Hooper 



1995 
1995 
1995 
1996 
1996 
1997 
1997 



PLANNING BOARD 



John K. Gagliani 

Stephen J. Browne, appt. to fill resig. 

Mark G. Cerel, resigned 

Paul B. Rhuda 

David B. Sharff 

David A. Franchi 



1995 
1995 
1996 
1997 
1998 
1999 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 

Geralyn N. Warren 

David A. Armstrong, resigned 

Jacques Parenteau, appt. to fill resig. 

Nina French 

Robert Miller 

Heidi Oppel 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 



1995 
1995 
1995 
1996 
1996 
1996 



Mary E. Rogers 

Valerie A. Mariani, State Appointed 

Janelle Schveighof fer 

James T. Regan 

Richard D. Jordan 



September 10, 



1995 
1996 
1996 
1998 
1999 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 



Michael J. Sullivan 
Georgia Colivas 
Lisa Wood 



1995 
1996 
1997 



APPOINTMENTS 
FIRE CHIEF 
William A. Kingsbury 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Richard D. Hurley 

SERGEANTS 



Ronald E. Kerr 
Raymond T. Wheeler 



John L. Mayer 
John W. Wilhelmi 



POLICE OFFICERS 



Richard D. Bishop 
Raymond M. Burton 
Patrick J. Caulfield 
John F. Carmichael 
Dana P. Friend 
Shawn P. Garvey 



Stephen H. Grover 

Robert G. Hudson 

Thomas P. McNiff 

Robert E. Naughton 

Kevin W. Robinson 



PERMANENT INTERMITTENT POLICE OFFICERS 



Lorna C. Fabbo 

Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr 



Ruth E. 
Daniel J. 



Gaffey 
Sicard 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN 

(All appointments expire April 1995 unless otherwise stated.) 

TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 

Michael J. Sullivan 

TREASURER/ COLLECTOR 

Robert G. Stokes 
October 1, 1993 - September 30, 1996 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Kenneth P. Feeney 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Georgia K. Colivas 

TOWN COUNSEL 

Mark G. Cerel 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Heidi F. Groff 1995 

Joan A. Willgohs, Resigned 1996 

Walter M. Collins, Resigned 1996 

Nancy L. Silva, Appt. to fill resig. 1996 

Debra M. Gursha 1997 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

David F. McCue 1995 

Eric W. O'Brien 1996 

Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 1997 

WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

John J. McKeever, resigned 1995 

Gary Lehmann, Appt. to fill resignation 1995 

Peyton C. March 1996 

Neil D. MacKenzie 1997 

Leland D. Beverage, Associate Member 1995 

SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 
Edward M. Hinkley 

TREE WARDEN 
Edward M. Hinkley 

FIELD DRIVER AND FENCE VIEWER 
John P. 0' Toole 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 

Jennifer A. Shaw 
Matthew Shaw, Assistant 
INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 
Jennifer A. Shaw 

POUND KEEPER 
Roy Owen 

INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

John P. O' Toole, Inspector of Buildings 
Anthony Calo, Assistant Inspector of Buildings 
Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 
John A. Rose, Jr., Assistant Gas Inspector 

John A. Rose, Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Joseph F. Erskine, Wiring Inspector 
Tauno 0. Aalto, Assistant Wiring Inspector 
James J. Leonard, Assistant Wiring Inspector 

OFFICIAL GREETER OF THE TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
Joseph E. Ryan 

OFFICIAL HISTORIAN OF THE TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
Richard P.DeSorgher 

OFFICIAL KEEPER OF THE TOWN CLOCK 

Austin C. Buchanan Edward M. Hinkley, Assistant 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

William H. Dunlea, Jr. 1995 

Mary I. MairEtienne, Deceased 1996 

Anna M. Murphy, Appt. to fill 1996 

Roberta A. Kolsti 1997 

VETERANS' DEPARTMENT 

Paul F.Curran, Director, Agent, Burial Agent, Deceased 

Gerald C. Doucette, Appt. to fill 

Lee DeSorgher, Deputy Agent 

G. Marshall Chick, Graves Officer 

COLLECTOR OF WATER AND SEWER USE CHARGES 

Robert G. Stokes September 30, 1996 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
Patricia A. Rioux 

MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 
Patricia A. Rioux 

PUBLIC WEIGHER 
Patricia A. Rioux 



10 



CONSTABLES AND KEEPERS OF THE LOCK UP 



Richard D. Bishop 
Raymond M. Burton, Jr 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick J. Caul fie Id 
John F. Carmichael 
Joseph G. Cavanaugh 
Lorna C. Fabbo 
Dana P. Friend 
Ruth A. Gaffey 
John T. Garvey 
Shawn P. Garvey 
John F. Gerlach 
Stephen H. Grover 
Robert G. Hudson 
Richard D. Hurley 



Ronald E. Kerr 

George W. Kingsbury 

Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr. 

William H. Mann 

John L. Mayer 

Thomas P. McNiff 

Robert E. Naughton 

Louise Papadoyiannis 

Patricia A. Rioux 

Kevin W. Robinson 

Daniel J. Sicard 

Thomas Tabarani 

Raymond J. Wheeler 

John W. Wilhelmi 



POLICE MATRONS 



Jessie A. Erskine 
Lorna G. Fabbo 
Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
Mary I. MairEtienne 
Elisabeth T. Mann 



Louise Papadoyiannis 

Patricia A. Rioux 

Jennifer A. Shaw 

Mary L. Solari 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 



Maj. A. F. Abdallah 
Leo Acera 
Jerry w. Adams 
Albert Baima 
Edwin Bettencourt 
Herbert Burr 
Steven Burke 
William A. Carlson 
Jonathan M. Carroll 
Vincent M. Cellucci 
Joseph Concannon 
Berton Cummings 
Robert E. Currie 
William J. Davis 
Thomas G. Degnim 
Joseph T. Destito 
Robert A. Dixon 
Michael J. Doran 
Kenneth Dunbar 
William J. Dwyer 
David Eberle 
David C. Egy 
Rob. V. Eklund, Jr. 
Leo R. Ethier, Jr. 
Jeffrey M. Farrell 
Susan A. Fornaciari 
Kevin Fortier 
John Gerlach 
Barry Glassman 
John J. Havkett, Jr 



Glen R. Eykel 

Pamela B. Holmes 

David J. Holt 

William D. Jones 

Winslow Karlson III 

Joseph Lapre 

Thomas Leen, Jr. 

Joy Leonard 

Roderick A. MacLeod 

David R. McConnell 

Edward J. Meau 

Aaron J. Mick 

Paul J. Murphy 

Frank S. Newell 

Peter Opansetts 

Louise Papadoyiannis 

Jeffrey Peavey 

James P. Pignone 

Stephen K. Plympton 

Janet M. Poirier 

Thomas Quinn 

Patricia A. Rioux 

Gary C. Rowley 

Robert J. Shannon 

Carl Sheridan 

Paul Sicard 

Charles H. Stone, Jr. 

John F. Sullivan 

Thomas A. Tabarani 

J. Robert Tosi 



11 



Steven F. Hagan 
Thomas Hamano 
Patrick Harris 
Timothy P. Heinz 
John Holmes 



Thomas Walsh 

Alan F. Washkewits 

Colin T. Wise 

Donna M. Wolf rum 

Craig P. Jones 



TRAFFIC SUPERVISORS 



Robert W. Brady 
Joseph Carvalho 
John T. Garvey, Jr. 
Mary V. Gillis 
Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
George Kingsbury 



Elisabeth T. Mann 

William H. Mann 

Armando B. Palmieri 

Mary L. Solari 

Jennifer A. Shaw 

Armando Viera, Jr. 



AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OFFICER 
Irene L. 0' Toole 

AFFORDABLE HOUSING COMMITTEE 



Bonnie Wren-Burgess 
Sharon Lowenthal 
Stephen M. Nolan 
Peter M. Michelson 
Diane Maxson 



Charles H. Peck 
Michael J. Sullivan 

Ann B. Thompson 
Mary Ellen Thompson 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



John J. Lynch 

Carl J. Brewer 

Ben B. Korbly, resigned 

Douglas Jenkins, appt. to fill resig. 

Jean C. Brown 

Robert K. Williams 

Madeleine I. Harding, Associate Member 

Annie M. Rogers, Associate Member 



1995 
1995 
1996 
1996 
1997 
1997 
1995 
1995 



AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT COMPLIANCE REVIEW COMMITTEE 



Jane Archer 
Kenneth Feeney 
Fred Rogers 



Austin Buchanan 

Chief Richard Hurley 

Michael J. Sullivan 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



SUBDIVISION CONTROL 



Robert F. Sylvia 

Burgess P. Standley 

Stephen M. Nolan 

Osier M. Peterson, Assoc. Member 

Charles H. Peck, Associate Member 

Kenneth M. Childs, Jr., Associate Member 



1995 
1996 
1997 
1995 
1995 
1995 



ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS COMMITTEE 
Frederick A. Rogers, Jr. Beverly Hallowell 

Bruno J. Palumbo Christie A. Shoop 

Michael J. Sullivan 



12 



BYLAW COMMITTEE 



Richard Guilmette 
Steven Kramer 



Harold F 



COUNCIL ON ARTS 



Steven Guy 

Philip B. Barnard 

Steven H. Cook 

Lucinda Davis 

Connie Jones 

John Horgan 

Francis A. Iafolla 

William F. Pope 

Wendy Clarridge Corkum 



Leo Surette 
Pritoni, Jr. 



1995 
1995 
1996 
1996 
1996 
1996 
1997 
1997 
1998 



CABLE T.V. COMMITTEE 
Clara B. Doub Robert H. Gibbs 

CABLE FRANCHISE NEGOTIATING COMMITTEE 



Thomas Sweeney 
Robert Gibbs 
William Kean 



Clara B. Doub 

Robert Sawyer 

Dr. Marion Catlin 



CAPITAL BUDGET COMMITTEE 



Margaret E. Bancroft 
Tidal B. Henry 
Nancy Temple Horan 



Michael J. Sullivan 
Patricia Whitney 



CEMETERY AGENT 
Lawrence G. Whitestone 



CHARLES RIVER NATURAL STORAGE AREA DESIGNEES 



Michael J. Sullivan 



Kenneth P. Feeney 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



Vincent M. Cellucci, Director 
Patrick S. Harris, Deputy Director 
Thomas Hamano, Underwater Rescue and Recovery 
Patrick S. Harris, Chief Radio Operator 
Judith C. Harris, Radio Operator 
Harold Economos, Radio Operator 
Barry M. Glassman, Radio Operator 
Neil I. Grossman, Radio Operator 
William Johnson, Radio Operator 
Vernon Valero, Radio Operator 
Patricia A. Rioux, Shelter Manager 

CIVIL DEFENSE AUXILIARY POLICE OFFICERS 

Vincent M. Cellucci, Deputy Chief 

Bruce Berry, Sergeant 



13 



Paul B. Alberta 
Christopher Burbank 
Raymond M. Burton, Jr 
Steven Dunlea 
Harold Economos 
Robert S. Gallagher 
Barry M. Glassman 
Thomas Hamano 
Judith C. Harris 
Patrick S. Harris 
William Johnson 
Craig Jones 
Eric Jones 
Kathleen Joyce 
Austin B. Smith 



John L. Mayer 

Thomas P. McNiff 

Andrew McLaughlin 

Lorieanne D. Niles 

Martha Post 

Thomas Ralph 

Tobey J. E. Reed 

Patricia A. Rioux 

James S. Ryan, Jr. 

Gordon Spencer 

Vernon Valero 

Jennifer Shaw 

Armando R. Viera, Jr. 

Wayne Sallale 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING TEAM 



Richard D. Hurley 
Tidal B. Henry 



Michael J. Sullivan 



COMMUNITY GARDENS COMMITTEE 



Aldo L. D'Angelo 
Leonard C. Haigh 
Edward Touhey 



David Noonan 

Harvey D. Hoover 

Edwin J. Kinter 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



John Thompson 

Ralph Parmigiane 

Ann Lee Howell 

Robert J. Ingram 

Craig S. Harwood 

Robert T. Burns 

Neil E. Simoni 

Theresa A. Cos, Associate Member 

James G. White, Associate Member 

Betty A. Kaerwer, Associate Member 

Scott D. Pitz, Associate Member 



1995 
1995 
1995 
1996 
1997 
1997 
1997 
1994 
1994 
1994 
1994 



CONSTABLE FOR ELECTIONS 
Nancy J. Preston 

CONTRACT COMPLIANCE OFFICER 
Michael J. Sullivan 





ECONOMIC 


Paul E. 


Hinkley 


Ann B. 


Thompson 


Neal C. 


Isaacson 


William 


D. Dischino 


Harold 


F. Pritoni, Jr. 


John T. 


Harney 


Eric W. 


O'Brien 


Charles 


H. Peck 



DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 



1995 
1995 
1996 
1996 
1996 
1997 
1997 
1997 



14 



NATIONAL ORGANIZATION ON DISABILITY 
Frederick A. Rogers, Jr. 

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES RESPONSE COMMITTEE 



Raymond M 
Robert E. 
Richard D 
Robert E. 



Burton 
Currie 

Hurley 
Meaney, Jr 



Joan M. Kiessling 

James D. Sullivan, M.D. 

Michael J. Sullivan 



EMERGENCY PLANNING COMMISSION 



Vincent M. Cellucci 
Kenneth F. Feeney 
Richard D. Hurley 



Robert A. Kinsman 

Michael J. Sullivan 

Ann B. Thompson 



EMPLOYEE INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



George J. Callahan 
Pauline Cooley 
Georgeanne Gerlach 
Robert H. White 



Malcolm J.Gibson 

Virginia A. Murley 

Robert J. Santoro 



ENFORCING OFFICER FOR ZONING 
John P. O'Toole Anthony Calo, Assistant 



ENTERPRISE FUND COMMITTEE 



Leland D. Beverage 
Georgia K. Colivas 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
Tidal B. Henry 



Peyton C. March 

John J. McKeever 

Michael J. Sullivan 



FAIR HOUSING OFFICER 
Michael J. Sullivan 

FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 



Robert G. Stokes 



Reverend Robert L. Wood 



MEDFIELD REPRESENTATIVE TO REGIONAL HAZARDOUS WASTE COMMITTEE 

Erin Pastuszenski 



Vincent M 
Kenneth P 
Richard D 



HAZMAT COMMITTEE 



Cellucci 

Feeney 

Hurley 



William A. Kingsbury 



Robert A. Kinsman 

Michael J. Sullivan 

Ann B. Thompson 

Joan A. Willgohs 



15 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Priscilla Batting 
Deborah Kelsey 
Michael Taylor 
Richard L. Reinemann 
David F. Temple 
Burgess P. Standley 
Barbara Palson 

Eleanor Anes, Associate Member 
Richard P. DeSorgher, Associate Member 
David L. Wilmarth, Associate Member 
Donald J. MacDonald, Associate Member 
Thompson S. Lingel, Associate Member 
Charlotte H. Reinemann, Associate Member 
John A. Thompson, Associate Member 
Electa Kane Tritsch, Associate Member 
Paul E. Nyren, Jr. , Associate Member 

HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSI 



Michael R. Taylor 
Donald J. MacDonald 
Diane E. Nightingale 



April 


1995 


April 


1995 


April 


1995 


April 


1995 


April 


1996 


April 


1996 


April 


1997 


April 


1995 


April 


1995 


April 


1995 


April 


1995 


April 


1995 


April 


1995 


April 


1995 


April 


1995 


April 

Trtll 


1995 


XKJli 

David E. Sharff 


Burgess P. Standley 



INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



W. Grant Chambers 



Joseph B. McWilliams 



KINGSBURY POND COMMITTEE 



Joseph Comeau 

Michael Cronin 

Armand Janjigian 

Barbara Leighton 

Thomas S. Lingel, Associate Member 



Paul E. Nyren, Jr. 

Richard Ostrander 

Paul Simpson 

Michael J. Sullivan 

Lori Zegarelli 



LOCAL AUCTION PERMIT AGENT 
Irene L. O'Toole 

LOCAL WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT OFFICIAL 
Kenneth P. Feeney 

LOCAL ELECTION DISTRICT REVIEW COMMITTEE 

Nancy J. Preston Robert G. Stokes 

MEDFIELD DESIGNEE - MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 
Michael J. Sullivan 

MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL COMMUNITY ADVISORY BOARD 



John T. Harney 
Barbara Cincotta 
Paul Bardelli 



Ann B. Thompson 

Leo J. Surette 

Darrah O'Connor 



16 



MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL REUSE COMMITTEE 

Mark G. Cerel Paul Rhuda 

Frank Garrison Burgess P. Standley 

Richard Guilmette Ann B. Thompson 

Michael J. Sullivan, Ex Officio 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

Martha L. Smick August 1995 

MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 

Paul F. Curran Albert J. Manganello, Jr. 

Clifford G. Doucette June Doucette 

Tidal B. Henry Frank C. Mayer 

Richard D. Hurley Irene L. O'Toole 

William A. Kingsbury Dorcas B. Owen 

Gerald P. Kazanjian Ernest C. Roy 

COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 

Clifford G. Doucette Richard F. DeSorgher 

Robert A. Kinsman David F. Temple 

Patricia A. Walsh 

MILLIS CONSORTIUM FOR RECYCLING 
Kenneth P. Feeney 

MINORITY BUSINESS ENTERPRISE OFFICER 
Irene L. O'Toole 

MUNICIPAL CENSUS SUPERVISOR 
Nancy J. Preston 

NEPONSET WATER SUPPLY PROTECTION STUDY COMMITTEE 
Leland D. Beverage 

REPRESENTATIVE TO THE NORFOLK COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 

John T. Harney 

OPEN SPACE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Jonathan Bennett Martha L. Smick 

Christine M. Ha j jar Caroline D. Standley 
Jane Ann Hayes James W. Sullivan 

Eric W. O'Brien 

PARKING CLERK AND HEARING OFFICER 

Nancy J. Preston Frederick A. Rogers, Jr., Asst. 



PUBLIC WORKS PROJECTS COMMITTEE 

Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. Michael J. Sullivan 

Kenneth P. Feeney 



17 



RECYCLING COMMITTEE 



Andrea Costello 
Timothy Holt 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
Sandra Frigon 
Cynthia Greene 



Donna Masterson 

James O'Shaughnessy 

Erin Pastuszenski 

Annette Wells 



JOINT REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE 
Daniel L. Jones, Jr. 



RIGHT-TO-KNOW COORDINATOR 
William A. Kingsbury 



SAFETY COMMITTEE 



Jane B. Archer 
Kenneth P. Feeney 



Marguerite M. Eppich 
Irene L. O'Toole 



THREE RIVERS INTERLOCAL COUNCIL (MAPC) 
Martha Smick Michael J. Sullivan 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEDFIELD CENTER TRAFFIC 



Richard D. Hurley, Chief 
Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 
Richard Hangen 



Mark G. Cerel 
David Temple 



TOWN HALL DESIGNER SELECTION COMMITTEE AND 
TOWN HALL RENOVATION COMMITTEE 



Margaret Bancroft 
Neil D. MacKenzie 
Burgess P. Standley 



Michael J. Sullivan 
Irene L. O'Toole 



YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



Marc R. Mercandante 
Eric B. Palson 
Mark W. Carrigan 
Peter C. Dunn 
Andrew M. Kepple 
Jill A. Steinkeler 
Noah W. Weinstein 
Thomas R. Guilmette 
Sheila M. McCabe 
Lauren M. Young 
Katherine L. Kearney 
Tracie L. Slack 
L. Paul Galante III 
Jennifer A. Karnakis 
Brendan D. McNulty 
Elizabeth Newton 
Regina O'Connor 
Kimberly A.E. O'Connor 



Sara E. Mastronardi 

Nicholas J. Scobbo III 

Matthew P. DeSorgher 

Jacquelyn M. Frazier 

Drew C. Marticke 

Kelly E. Thomson 

Daniel V. Arnold 

Jillian D. Mariani 

Elizabeth L. McKeever 

Allison M. Foley 

Jennifer L. LaFrance 

Anna-Mari Spognardi 

Ellen L. Gray 

Melissa P. Kelcourse 

Ray M. Burton, Jr. 

Mary V. Gillis 

Thomas P. McNiff 

Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 



18 



APPOINTED BY ASSESSORS 

Stanley E. Bergeron, Assistant Assessor 
Irene M. Hartling, Assistant Assessor 
Marjorie M. Temple, Assistant Assessor 

APPOINTED BY TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
June Doucette, Assistant 

APPOINTED BY TOWN CLERK 

Dorcas B. Owen, Assistant 
Frederick A. Rogers, Jr., Assistant Hearing Officer 

APPOINTED BY CHAIRMAN OF THE SELECTMEN 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

AND THE MODERATOR 

VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE REPRESENTATIVE 

Karl D. Lord June 30, 1995 



APPOINTED BY FIRE CHIEF 

Charles G. Seavey, Deputy Fire Chief 
Thomas Seeley, Captain 

Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr., Lieutenant 
Richard M. Rogers, Lieutenant 
David C. O'Toole, Lieutenant 
Neal J. O'Connor, Lieutenant 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

William R. Domey, P.E., Engineer/Agent 
John J. Keefe, R.S., Milk Inspector/Agent 
Mae L. Otting, Administrative Assistant 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

DEPUTY MODERATOR 
Andrew F. Thompson, Jr. 

WARRANT COMMITTEE 



James F. O'Neil 
Pat Whitney 
Sally I. Wright 
Mary W. Harney 
John F. Kendrick 
George P. Niles, 
Lebaron C. Colt, 
Claire A. Hangen 
Steven E. Kramer 



Jr. 
Jr. 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1995 
1995 
1995 
1996 
1996 
1996 
1997 
1997 
1997 



19 



PERMANENT SCHOOL BUILDING AND PLANNING COMMITTEE 

F. Paul Quatromoni April 1995 

David R. Iverson April 1995 

Harry C. Merrow April 1996 

Elmer 0. Portmann April 1996 

Clarence A. Purvis April 1997 
Thomas M. Reis, Ex Officio 



SCHOOL SPACE NEEDS COMMITTEE 



Lawrence Colvin 
Charles Flagg 
Clark Holland 



Thomas Reis 

Sharon Semeraro 

Robert Zabe 



APPOINTED BY THE COMMITTEE CONSISTING OF THE MODERATOR. 
THE CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN AND CHAIRMAN 
OF THE WARRANT COMMITTEE 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

James F. Lynn 

Jane T. Coury, resigned 

Keith R. Wasley, appt. to fill resig 

Kathleen M. Cur ran 



November 30, 1995 

November 30, 1996 

November 30, 1996 

November 30, 1997 



APPOINTED BY THE PLANNING BOARD 
ASSOCIATE PLANNING BOARD MEMBER FOR SITE PLAN REVIEWS 
Joseph R. Parker, Jr. April 1995 



LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 
formerly, THE MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



Andrea C. Costello 
Burgess P. Standley 
David G. Strimaitis 
Geralyn M. Warren 
Denise Yurkofsky 
Peter Fellmen 
Gregory A. Beedy 
Margaret H. Gryska 
Timothy P. Sullivan 



SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 



Paul J. Alfano 
Philip P. Bonanno 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER /COLLECTOR 



June 28, 


1995 


June 28, 


1995 


June 28, 


1995 


June 28, 


1996 


June 28, 


1996 


June 28, 


1996 


June 28, 


1997 


June 28, 


1997 


Junw 28, 


1997 


April 


1995 


April 


1997 



Marguerite M. Eppich, Assistant Treasurer 
Nancy Griffin, Assistant Collector 



September 30, 1995 
September 30, 1995 



20 



BOARD, COMMITTEE AND COMMISSION MEETINGS 



NAME 

Annual 

Town Election 

Annual 

Town Meeting 

Appeals Board 

Arts Council 

Assessors 

Civil Defense 

Conservation 

Health 



Historical 
Commission 

Housing Auth 

Library 
Trustees 

Park & Rec . 



Planning 
Recycling 
School Comm. 

Selectmen 
Warrant Comm, 
Water/Sewer 



DAY 

Last Monday 
in March 

Last Monday 
in April 

Wed. as needed 

Biannually 

1st Thurs . /mo . 

1st Tues./mo. 

1st & 3rd Thurs. 
per month 

1st & 3rd Wed. 
per month 

3rd Wed. /mo. 



TIME 

6:00 a.m. 
to 8:00 p.m 

7 :30 p.m. 



7 :30 p.m. 

8 : 00 p.m. 

6 : 00 p.m. 

7 : 00 p.m. 

7 :30 p.m. 

6 :30 p.m. 

8 :00 p.m. 



3rd Mon./mo. 7:30 p.m, 

2nd Tues./mo. 7:30 p.m. 

2nd & 4th Tues . 7:30 p.m, 
per mo. 

Monday ea. week 8:00 p.m, 

1st Tues /mo. 7:30 p.m, 

1st & 3rd Mon./ 7:30 p.m, 

Sept.- June 

once a mo. July-August 

Every other 7:00 p.m 

Tuesday (or as needed) 

Tuesday-Fall to 7:30 p.m 
Town Meeting 

1st & 3rd Tues. 7:30 p.m 



PLACE 

Memorial School 

High School 

Town Hall 
Town Hall 
Town Hall 
Police Station 
Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Tilden Village 
Library 

Pfaff Center 

Town Hall 
Town Hall 
Dale St. Sch. 

Town Hall 
Town Hall 
Town Hall 



21 



22 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1994 



23 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

To the residents of Medfield: 

The Board reorganized for the ensuing year in March. Ann B. Thompson was elected 
Chairman, Tidal B. Henry was elected Clerk and newly elected third member John T. Harney 

was welcomed. 

ELECTIONS TO FILL VACANCIES 

During the year several special elections were held to fill vacancies created by the 
resignations of elected officials. The results of these elections are as follows: 

Board Officers Resigning Elected Replacement 

Planning Board Mark G. Cerel Stephen J. Browne 

Trustees of the Public Library Richard M. Fitzpatrick Jane Partis McCarty 

James C. Baughman Wendy S. Sonsire 

Park Commissioners David A. Armstrong Jacques N. Parenteau 

On July 1, Mark G. Cerel assumed the duties of Town Counsel. In June Police Officer 
Robert W. Brady retired after forty years of service on the Medfield Police Department, Ann 
B. Thompson and Anthony Grogan stepped down after twenty and sixteen years, 
respectively, of service as Emergency Medical Technicians. Lorna C. Fabbo and Thomas 
LaPlante, Jr. were appointed Police Officers on July 26. Gary Fraser retired from the 
Highway Department in September after thirty-five years of service. 

The Town was saddened to learn in the Spring of the deaths of Mary MairEtienne, registrar 
of voters and Paul F. Curran, veterans agent. Anna Murphy and Clifford Gerald Doucette 
were appointed, respectively, to these positions. It has been the contributions of elected 
officials, board and commission members, and employees such as Mary and Paul that have 
helped Medfield to successfully deal with the numerous issues facing the Town. Thank you. 

A WINTER TO REMEMBER 



After a mild fall, 1995 started with a fury that few would soon forget. Seventeen 
snowstorms interspersed with severe cold temperatures convinced many residents that 
winter would never end. Bad weather rarely slows the course of Town business, however, 
especially when Medfield was in the midst of a residential building boom that strained the 
financial and physical resources of the Town. Over 100 permits for new houses were issued. 
Major subdivisions were under construction in many parts of the Town. This development 
activity with the accompanying leveling of wooded areas, blasting of ledge, erosion of soil, 
digging up of streets for water and sewer installations, heavy trucking, dust, noise and traffic 
congestion alarmed many residents, who thought the Town was growing too fast and losing 
its rural character. 

The Open Space Committee, in response to concern about the scope and pace of 
development, put together a proposal to acquire open parcels of land that might otherwise 
be developed. After reviewing the open space map, the members prepared a list of parcels 
that were at risk and set a priority on them. They then contacted land owners to see if they 

24 



were willing to sell the land to the Town. It was decided to proceed with the acquisition of a 
21.5 acre parcel off High St. which was critical to the protection of the Town's water supply 
and was threatened by encroaching development. A debt exclusion override was placed on 
the March ballot and was approved by an overwhelming margin. The Annual Town Meeting 
authorized the sale of bonds. With those votes in hand, the Open Space Committee updated 
the Town's Open Space Plan and applied for self-help funding from the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Department of Environmental Management. The Town acquired this parcel 
from Robert Holmquist in August and was subsequently notified that it had been awarded a 
grant of $290,000 from the self-help program. The grant covered 58% of the purchase price. 
The reaction of townspeople to this initiative was so favorable that the Committee began 
meeting in October to prepare a list of parcels for consideration by the voters at the 1995 
annual election and town meeting. 

COPING WITH GROWTH 

In addition to the obvious physical changes to the Town resulting from the high level of 
development activity, there were many other stresses and strains which had to dealt with in 
order to meet the needs of a growing population. 

First and foremost of concern was the school system. Enrollment had been falling for fifteen 
years but it reversed in the early 1990's and was growing by more than 100 students per 
year. The education mandates imposed by the Commonwealth and the lack of financial 
support from the Governor and the Legislature made school funding more difficult with each 
passing year. Compounding this difficulty, the High School renovation and expansion had 
increased the annual debt service costs by $1.1 million. With the High School Project well 
underway, Town Meeting appointed a School Space Needs Committee to evaluate 
additional space needs throughout the rest of the system. 

Space requirements were also among the considerations in the Library Trustees request for 
funds to undertake a preliminary Study for renovation and expansion of the library. 
Increased circulation, computerization of library services and handicapped accessibility 
requirements combined with the possibility of obtaining partial funding of an addition from 
the Commonwealth caused the Trustees to dedicate much of their efforts during the year to 
bring library alterations to fruition. 

Making the Town House accessible and providing additional space for town and school 
offices were the major factors in developing preliminary plans for renovation of that 
structure. In December an architect was hired to prepare schematic design plans and cost 
estimates for submission to the 1995 Town Meeting. Town officials were concerned with the 
parking requirements for these buildings and the overall parking needs of the downtown. 
Addressing these needs was seen as a critical goal for the coming year. 

Another local facility straining to cope with the increasing level of use was the post office. 
For several years postal officials had been looking for a new site for the post office. The long 
range planning committee urged the Selectmen to do everything possible to keep the post 
office in the center of the Town in order to keep the downtown area lively and viable. When 
the postal officials announced that they would be seeking proposals for a new post office, 
the Selectmen set up meetings with them in an effort to find a suitable site in the downtown 
area. A decision on the location for this facility was expected in early 1995. 



25 



Rounding out developments in the downtown, the traffic engineering study funded as part of 
the capital budget was completed and forwarded to the Massachusetts Highway Department. 
Utilizing the results of this study, the Town expected to obtain funding from the 
Commonwealth for upgrading of the traffic signals along Route 109. 

Water and Sewer requirements were given much consideration during the year. At the 
Annual Town Meeting funds were appropriated to undertake updates to the master plans for 
water and sewerage, given the increasing demands for these services resulting from the rapid 
residential development. Plans to have well six on line in 1994 were thwarted by delays in 
obtaining an easement from the Commonwealth to construct this well on state-owned land 
along the Charles River near the Medfield State Hospital. This was particularly frustrating 
given the imposition of a water ban during the spring and summer months because of lack of 
capacity to meet peak water demand. In addition at year's end the Water and Sewerage 
Board found volatile organic chemical levels exceeding state and federal guideline levels in 
wells one and two, which are located along the Charles River adjacent to Route 109. 
Meetings with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection were set up to 
determine how to treat the water to remove the contaminants. 

The provision of adequate recreational facilities was addressed by the Park and Recreation 
Commission with the assistance of the Medfield Sports Boosters. Utilizing the conceptual 
plans for the development of McCarthy Park, the Sports Boosters proposed to construct 
four baseball fields and two soccer fields with private funds. After several meetings during 
the fall the Board of Selectmen agreed to transfer jurisdiction over a portion of this site to 
the Park and Recreation Commission and entered into an agreement with the Sports 
Boosters covering the development of these fields. The work is expected to begin in the 
Spring of 1995. 

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS 

The Annual Town Meeting voted to establish the Hospital Farms Historic District 

encompassing the Medfield State Hospital Campus. On July 12 the Selectmen and the 

Historical Commission presented the Historic Preservation Award to Ann and William 
Krawec for their efforts in preserving the Daniel Sanders house at 402 Main Street. 

Ceremonies were held on May 29 to dedicate the Richard C. Werner Square at the 
intersection of Hospital Road and West Mill Street. This square was dedicated by vote of the 
Town Meeting to honor this young man who died in the service of his country during World 
War II. The Committee to study Memorials developed plans for the erection of a monument 
at Baxter Park to recognize the contributions of Medfield servicemen and servicewomen. 

The cable television franchise license for Medfield was scheduled to expire in 1995. The 
Board appointed a committee to negotiate the renewal of this license. The newly adopted 
demolition bylaw was utilized when the owner of the Pine Tree Farm Barn on Pondview 
Road was required to advertise the property for sale and delay the demolition for six months 
in an effort to preserve this structure. Unfortunately, no buyer was found and the barn was 
taken down to make way for a house. The new Curve Street bridge was opened for use in 
the Spring. In response to requests from residents of Causeway Street a portion of that 
street between the Causeway and Noon Hill Road was paved. The Causeway itself and 
another section south of Noon Hill Road were left unpaved. 



26 



The Board revised its earth removal regulations to address the numerous complaints 
members had received regarding the number, frequency and speed of trucks that were 
entering and leaving construction sites. A Bylaw Study Committee was appointed to review 
and update the Town's bylaws and to report back to the 1995 Annual Town Meeting. After 
considerable discussion the Board voted on March 1 to keep the ambulance service under 
the jurisdiction of the Police Department and to increase the ambulance budget to upgrade 
training for the Emergency Medical Technicians. It was agreed to review the operation of 
the ambulance within a year. In December, the Board voted to increase building inspection 
fees based upon the recommendations of the Inspector of Buildings. 

CONCLUSION 

Not unlike prior periods of rapid development in Medfield, 1994 was an unsettling time for 
both the residents and officials of the Town. The pace and the impact of construction 
afforded little opportunity to keep up with the often conflicting demands of residents and 
developers. Tempers frequently flared and Town officials found their negotiating skills put to 
the test over and over again. 

There were positive aspects to the year as well: initiatives of the Open Space Committee to 
acquire open land and support of the taxpayers for this initiative; generous donations of 
private land and easements; groundbreaking for the High School; development of plans to 
update the library and the town house; restoration of several handsome old homes; and the 
enthusiastic efforts of many volunteers to make Medfield a better place to live. Many will 
recall the eighth grade students lined up along Main Street on an early November morning 
with their placards urging support for their favorite candidates; and others will recall the 
sights and sounds of Medfield Day, when long time residents and newcomers got together to 
celebrate small town life. Some will recount the rainy day walk from Medfield to Brookline 
to support the Shannon McCormack House; and all will remember, if not too fondly, the 
endless snows of winter. However, memories fade and history compresses many memories 
into a few facts. When the history of 1994 is written, the Town will be judged on how its 
residents dealt with growth and change. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Ann B. Thompson, Chairman 
Tidal B. Henry, Clerk 
John T. Harney 
Board of Selectmen 



27 




Town Administrator Michael J. Sullivan, Superintendent of 
Public Works, Kenneth P. Feeney, Selectman Tidal B. Henry, 
Highway Foreman Robert Kennedy, and County Engineer, Wayne A. 
Simpson at Massachusetts Highway Annual Meeting. 




The family of Walter Frank deed a parcel of land in 
his memory, marking the start of a trail from 
Medfield Center to Rocky Woods. 



28 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my 13 th Annual Report for the Public Works Department. 

STREET DEPARTMENT 

Resurfacing : The following streets were stone sealed: 

South Street, West Street, Harding Street, West Mill Street, Miller Street, Park Street, 
Pleasant Street, Curve Street, Metacomet Street, Pleasant Court, Oak Street, Westview 
Road, Hilltop Circle, Pondview Avenue, Stuart Street. 

Curve Street Bridge Project : The Curve Street Bridge was opened in the month of July 
thanks to a joint effort between District 3 Highway Department and the Medfield Highway 
Department. As part of this project the Medfield Highway Department also built 1050 feet 
of sidewalk along Curve Street and Pleasant Street. 

Memorial Park : The Highway Department reconstructed the intersection of West Mill 
Street and Harding Street. A memorial park dedicated to Richard C. Werner, who gave 
his life during World War II, was also part of this project. 

Wheelchair Ramps : The ongoing program to make our sidewalks handicap accessible 
continued with the addition of a ramp at the intersection of Janes Avenue and Main Street. 

High School Construction : At the request of the School Department, the Highway 
Department built a construction road for the new addition at the High School. This road 
was made to keep construction vehicles separate from student traffic at the High School 
and Middle School. 

Millbrook Road Culvert : The Millbrook Road culvert collapsed in May and had to be 
replaced with three 24 inch pipes 48 feet long. 

Noonhill Road Culvert : The Noonhill Road culvert at Holts Pond was replaced with a 48 
inch culvert pipe. As part of this project 800 feet of roadway was reconstructed and a 
parking lot built. 

Bakers Pond : During the summer, the Highway Department drained and cleaned debris 
from the bottom of Bakers Pond. The stone masonry wall on the southside of the pond, 
from the sluiceway for a distance of 250 feet, was reconstructed. The joints on the earth 
dam portion of the stone wall were also cemented. The project was completed in 
approximately ten weeks. 

Road Patching : After a very hard winter pot holes were everywhere making the spring of 
1994 a busy season for the Highway Department. Most of the complaints came from 
South Street Ext. where a contractor had run sewer and the Water Department had run 
water main. Once the weather changed to more favorable conditions and the trenches 



29 



stopped settling, both the water and sewer jobs were overlaid with an inch and a half of 
hot top, curb to curb. 

Causeway Street: Road repairs were not limited to hot top roads; gravel roads also 
needed extensive repairs. The Highway Department had to haul gravel to Causeway 
Street and reshape the road with a grader. Four inches of crushed bank was added later to 
the street. 

Retirement : Gary Fraser retired in September after thirty five years of service to the 
Town. Gary was a good friend to everyone and will be missed. 

Snow : Total snowfall for 1994, measured at the Highway Garage, was 79 inches. The 
Highway Department was called out 43 times for plowing and salting/sanding. The total 
expenditure for the winter was $276,007. The Selectmen and Warrant Committee voted 
to declare a snow emergency in order to raise funds to take care of the snow debt. 

TRANSFER STATION 

Recycled : Glass 141.34 tons 

Cans 19.07 tons 

#2 Plastics 19.72 tons 

White Goods Metal 235.53 tons 

Newsprint 709.16 tons 

Grass and Leaves 1500 cubic yards 

Brush 1200 cubic yards 

Revenue received from deposit cans and bottles $2252.30 

The Medfield Highway Department trucked 5870.18 tons of rubbish to the Millbury 
incinerator. 

Water Department 

The Medfield Water Department replaced, fixed, installed or inspected the following: 



Broken water mains 


5 




New meters 112 


Hydrants replaced 


6 




Stopped meters 29 


Water services 


104 




Repaired meters 4 


New Water Mains: 








Overfield Drive 




1056' 




Derby Lane 




422' 




Martingale Lane 




422' 




Snowhill Lane 




528' 




Overfield Easement 




792' 




Walden Court 




792' 




Alcott Way 




528' 




Birch Lane & 








Valley Road 




1584' 





30 



Wild Holly Road 1056' 

Cole Drive 528' 

Hawthorne Easement 500' 

Wood End Lane Easement 500' 

Elm Street 700' 

Flushing Mains: The water mains were flushed twice due to increased complaints of dirty 
water. Past practices were to flush annually. We continued our annual valve turning 
program. 

In the Fall of 1994, the Hawthorne Booster Station came on line. This will increase water 
pressure and help fire protection in that area. 

The total amount of water pumped in 1994 was 424,912,000 gallons, the highest in the 
history of the Department. 

Sewer Department 

In 1994 the Medfield Wastewater Treatment Plant treated 345,979,940 gallons of 
sewerage of which 31,257,480 gallons came from the State Hospital. The Treatment Plant 
received 622,600 gallons of septage from Medfield residents. The Sewer Department also 
trucked 827,000 gallons of 4% solid sludge to the New England Treatment Company in 
Rhode Island. 

Inspections in March of 1994, by the Environmental Protection Agency, found everything 
to be in order. 

In October of 1994 five groups of eighth graders toured the Wastewater Treatment Plant. 

The Treatment Plant was completely put on line in November of 1994, two additional 
aeration tanks and two additional primary tanks were added to the process. 

All operators at the Treatment Plant attended school to keep their licenses up to date. Bill 
Donovan passed the Grade 5 license exam and became the Assistant Chief Operator. 
Congratulations Bill! 

In conclusion, appreciation is expressed to secretaries Edith Fernald of the Highway 
Department and to Evelyn Clarke of the Water and Sewer Department, Robert Kennedy, 
Street Department Foreman, Charles Evans, Water and Sewer Foreman and Peter Iafolla, 
Chief Operator of the Wastewater Treatment Plant, as well as, all the men of the various 
departments who are to be commended for their continuous conscientious public service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kenneth P. Feeney, 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



31 



■ ••-■• ;•■■ . 




HIGHWAY PROJECTS 



Curve Street Bridge 



Millbrook Road 
Culvert 





Baker's Pond 



32 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I would like to thank the Board of Selectmen and the residents of Medfield for 
their continuing support throughout the year. It was, once again, a year of challenge and 
excitement. Enhanced 911 was installed in February, making Medfield the first in the 
state. 

I would like to thank Senior Dispatcher, Pat Rioux, for her work on this project. 
The Board of Selectmen commended Dispatcher Rioux in September, saying "a lot of lives 
will be saved because of your work." 

I would also like to thank Sergeant John Wilhelmi for his efforts in seeing to it that 
the new computer system, on line in April, was installed correctly and remains 
operational twenty-four hours a day. The computer allows instant access to records, 
dangerous call locations and statistical data on all incidents. 

On February 15, 1994, Officer Robert Brady retired after thirty-nine years (39) as 
a Medfield Police Officer. Bob had received many citations throughout the years and was 
honored by the Board of Selectmen for his many years of excellent service to his 
community. 

John Gerlach was appointed full time Dispatcher in March, replacing Lorna Fabbo 
who went on the road full time as a Permanent Intermittent, replacing Officer Brady. 

On August 31, 1994, Officer Thomas McNifF transferred to the Needham Police 
Department. Tom served as our A.B.C.C. Officer, DARE Officer and Detective. We all 
want to say thanks to Officer Tom for serving his community with such esteem. 

Lorna Fabbo was appointed as a full time Police Officer, September 4, 1994, along 
with Thomas LaPlante who started September 15, 1994. Officer Carmichael completed 
the DARE Academy in August of this year and will be instructing the fifth grade this 
school year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Hurley, Chief 
MEDFIELD POLICE DEPARTMENT 



33 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Statistics for 1994 are as follows: 

Accidents 327 

Ambulance trips 387 

Animal Control Calls 1684 

Arson 1 

Arrests 53 

Assaults 13 

Assists 690 

Bomb Scares 1 

Breaking and Entering 44 

Burglar Alarms 808 

Civil and Family Problems 170 

Deer Killed by Cars 41 

Disturbance Calls 199 

Doors and Windows 46 

Drug Offense 12 

Funeral Traffic 38 

Hazard Calls 326 

Larceny 100 

Malicious Damage 17 

Messages Delivered 8 

Mischief 100 

Missing Patients-MSH 32 

Missing Patients-MSH returned 30 

Protective Custody 8 

Sex Offenses 4 

Stolen Cars 8 

Stolen Cars recovered 7 

Sudden Deaths 5 

Summons Served 120 

Suspicious Cars 77 

Suspicious Persons 81 

Threats 6 

Water Complaints 69 

Weapons Violations 7 



34 




Officer Robert W. Brady 




Police Dispatcher Patricia Rioux working at the new 
Enhanced 911 unit. 

35 



AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In 1994, the Ambulance Department went through many positive changes. To 
facilitate these changes, the budget was increased at Town Meeting to incorporate training 
and equipment for the EMTs. 

Portable radios/pagers were purchased for each EMT to enable quicker response 
time and a summer and winter jumpsuit purchased for each EMT to easily identify the 
EMTs at the scene. 

Although training sessions were available in the past, our EMTs were not 
compensated for their time or any fees involved. Training is now provided throughout the 
year at the Police Station and the EMTs are compensated for their time. New training 
includes radio protocol, BLS rounds, head trauma injuries, ALS/BLS interface, summer 
emergencies, fire scene response, EPI pens, defibrillator training, patient assessment and 
the handling of psychiatric patients. 

Four EMTs were added to our squad this year; Gretchen Bright, Lorraine 
Helmboldt, Craig Jones and Richard Lane. The addition of personnel has proved to be of 
great benefit to the squad and the Town. In February, Ann Thompson retired after 15 
years of dedicated service as an EMT. She will be missed. 

Two defibrillators were added to the Ambulance Department this year. The first 
purchased through the capital budget and the second, scheduled to be purchased in 1995, 
was purchased a little earlier than expected, through donations from the townspeople and 
considerable donations from the Medfield Women's Association and two citizens who 
choose to remain anonymous. One defib is loaded on board the ambulance and the other 
in a police cruiser now reducing on scene help to 2-3 waiting minutes. Both EMTs and 
Police Officers have been trained on the use of this equipment. 

I would like to thank the Paramedic Units from the Metro West Medical Center, 
Natick Campus and Norwood Hospital for all their assistance throughout the year. A 
special thanks for all the men and women who dedicate their time to serve as Emergency 
Medical Technicians for the Town and their families for their patience. 



Destination 


Total Runs 


Metrowest Medical Center-Natick 


243 


Norwood Hospital 
Glover Memorial 


94 
21 


Metrowest Medical Center-Framingham 
Southwood Hospital 
Newton- Wellesley Hospital 
Other (Boston Area Hospitals) 
TOTAL 


11 

9 

5 

4 
387 RUNS 



36 



Advanced Life Support Services Used 
Service 


Times Used 


Metrowest Medical Center-Natick Paramedics 


108 


Norwood Hospital Paramedics 
Lifeflight Helicopter 
Medflight Helicopter 
TOTAL 


36 

2 

1 
on 147 RUNS 



Mutual Aid 



From 



Runs 



To 



Runs 











Millis 

Dover 

Walpole 

Norfolk 

Sherbom 


19 
8 

3 

3 

1 


Millis 
Dover 


2 
6 


TOTAL FROM 


34 


TOTAL TO 


8 



Respectfully submitted, 

Sergeant John W. Wilhelmi, EMT 
AMBULANCE COORDINATOR 




Selectman Thompson is honored for completion of 
fifteen years of service as an EMT. 



37 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER/ INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectman 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report reflects my duties as Animal Control Officer and Animal Inspector 
from January 1 through December 31, 1994. 



Total Animal Control Calls for 1994 


1,689 


Total Animal Control incidents 


806 


Licensed dogs returned to their owners 201 




Number of citations issued 60 




Number of animals killed on our roadways 193 




Cats 25 




Dogs 15 




Raccoons 37 




Deer 33 




Opossums 16 




Geese 19 




Other 48 




Number of sick or injured wildlife destroyed by ACO 36 




Raccoons 28 




Deer 11 




Opossum 1 




Other 16 




NOTE: All sick wildlife are presumed to be rabid, and are incinerated. 




Number of stray dogs adopted 12 




Number of stray cats adopted 27 





All barns and livestock have been inspected and passed the requirements of the Town of 
Medfield and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. All of the animals and barns are in 
the best of condition. 

The following animals were counted in Medfield in 1994: 

Beef cows 10 

Donkeys 2 

Goats 2 

Horses 43 

Ponies 2 

Poultry 100+ 

Sheep 10 

Swine 1 



38 



Thirteen cats have been added to the list of thirty quarantined cats for a total of 
forty-three cats quarantined in 1994 Two unvaccinated dogs and three vaccinated dogs 
were quarantined in 1994. In the first quarter of the year there were three dog bites 
requiring a minimum ten-day quarantine of the animal, in the second quarter there were an 
additional five dog bites, and in the third quarter there were two. The fourth quarter 
there were five dog bites requiring a minimum ten-day quarantine, for a total of fifteen dog 
bites in 1994 

I appreciate the continuing support and cooperation of the Town of Medfield, the 
Medfield Police Department, the Humane Society of Medfield, and Heritage Hill 
Veterinary Clinic. I also want to thank the Medfield residents and friends for their 
ongoing donations and support of the animals at the Medfield Animal Shelter. Without 
them I could not have saved the twenty-seven cats and twelve dogs that were adopted this 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jennifer A. Shaw 

ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 

ANIMAL INSPECTOR 




Animal Control Officer Shaw with Samantha, one of the 
dogs she was able to find a home for. 



39 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Chief of the Fire Department for the year ending 
December 31, 1994. 

This year has been another busy year for the Fire Department. Our response to 
incidents surpassed last year's three hundred, for a total of three hundred and sixteen. 
With the new home construction continuing, as well as major renovations to the High 
School and nursing home, the need for plan reviews and inspections of the work being 
done continued throughout the year. 

Training sessions for all personnel were conducted throughout the year. One of 
the highlights of our training this year was a "live burn" training session. A local builder 
donated a two story house that was slated for demolition for us to use. This all day event 
included live fire scenarios and simulated fireground injuries. Over fifity people 
participated in this training. In addition to members of the department, members of the 
Ambulance Department and the Dover Fire Department were included. The Department 
training officer's put in a great amount of time and effort into planning this event. It was 
a tremendous success and extremely beneficial to all of those who participated. We were 
also the host community for a class conducted by the Massachusetts Fire Academy on 
protective breathing apparatus and search and rescue procedures. This class was attended 
by fire personnel from the Norfolk County area. 

We continue to up-date our equipment. This year we started a replacement 
program which will up-date the breathing apparatus to a smaller and lighter unit. The 
conversion of our supply line to large diameter hose has been completed. Our apparatus, 
with the exception of the ladder truck, is in good condition. Our present aerial ladder is 
becoming more of a problem every year. This unit, which was purchased used, is 32 years 
old. The manufacturer is no longer in business which makes replacement parts scarce, and 
sometimes we are forced to make repairs with used parts. I will be seeking funds to 
replace this unit in FY 97, although it is a major expense, it should be considered as a long 
term investment. 

Our personnel remained the same this year, a total of twenty-nine members. It 
should be noted that the Fireman's Relief Association took it upon themselves to raise the 
funds to construct the garage located to the rear of the station. This building was built to 
house the two pieces of antique fire apparatus that were stored under the Town Hall. This 
freed up much needed space at the Town Hall, and will also allow easier access and 
viewing of this fire apparatus which is an important part of the Town's history. They are 
to be praised for their efforts. 

Fire prevention inspections and drills were conducted at the schools, state hospital, 
nursing home and other public buildings throughout the year. 



40 



As always, I wish to thank all the members of the department for their continued 
efforts and support during the year. I would also like to thank our volunteer dispatcher 
Fred Rogers, Town Officials, and Town Hall personnel for their help and cooperation 
throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Kingsbury, Fire Chief 
MEDFIELD FIRE DEPARTMENT 



SERVICES RENDERED FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 3 1, 1994 

ALARMS 

Accidental 59 

Box 163 

False 5 

Still 153 

Home 39 

SERVICES 

Ambulance Assist 7 

Appliances 9 

Bomb Scares 1 

Brush and Grass 20 

Burners Oil: 7 

Gas: 1 

Details 3 

Dumpsters 3 

Electrical 19 

Fuel Spills 1 

Investigations 56 

Motor Vehicles 6 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 1 1 

Mutual Aid - Rendered: 2 

Received: 3 

Reports to Fire Marshall 5 

Responses to State Hospital 18 

Station Duty 4 

Structures 5 

PUBLIC ASSISTANCE 

Lock Outs 5 

Pumping Cellars 1 

Water Problems 9 

Other 3 

INSPECTIONS 

Blasting 97 

Fire Prevention 48 

41 



Fuel Storage 
New Residential 
Smoke Detectors - New 

- Resale 
Oil Burners 
Wood stoves 
Other 
PERMITS ISSUED 
Blasting 
Bonfire 
Burning 
Fuel Storage 
Sprinkler Installation/ Alt 
Onsite Fueling 
Propane Storage 
Powder Storage 
U/Tank Removal 
Fire Alarm Installation 
Tank Truck 
Sprinkler System Installation 



19 
100 
100 
150 

27 
7 

11 

37 

1 

579 

19 
3 
1 

10 
2 

15 
1 
2 
2 




Firefighters following the tradition of pushing the 
1929 Seagrave into its new home for good luck. 



42 




Firefighters training at "live burn" on South Street. 




Firefighters and EMT's participate in simulated rescue 
techniques at "live burn." rescue 



43 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During this fiscal year 1994, the Council on Aging has provided many services to 
Medfield seniors. 

We continue to provide the free monthly blood pressure and health clinic by the 
Walpole Visiting Nurse Association, a free monthly hearing testing, and a podiatrist who 
charges $10 per person. Our flu immunization in November served over 250 seniors and 
younger people with health problems at no cost to them. 

We distributed food through the United States Government surplus food program, 
and anything that was left over was given to the Medfield Food Cupboard. 

We have our daily lunch program at the PfafF Center which provides good food 
and companionship, and very dedicated volunteers deliver about 24 meals a day to 
homebound seniors through our "meals on wheels" program. 

Medfield senior ladies made 34 beautiful afghans that were donated to a home for 
battered women and children in Framingham, and some went to the Medfield Home 
Committee for distribution. 

Our Chairman, Ben Korbly resigned after 10 years of service, and our new 
Chairman is F. Douglas Jenkins of Medfield who recently retired from General Electric. 

Through a grant from the State, we are able to purchase a computer which should 
simplify the record keeping. We are associated with HESSCO (Health and Social 
Services Consortium), the Executive Office of Elder Affairs, and South Middlesex Legal 
Affairs. 

We try to keep Medfield seniors informed of events through the H P E 
Newsletter. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. Douglas Jenkins, Chairman 
Barbara J. Connors, Executive Director 



44 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 1994 the Board of Appeals acted on the following applications: 

GRANTED: Two Special Permits for Family Apartments 
Four requests to withdraw applications 
Two Special Permits for home occupations 
A SpeciaJ Permit for an auto repair service 
Two Special Permits for work in the Aquifer Protection District 
Modification of a Special Permit for work in the Aquifer 
Variance from the rear setback to allow a porch/deck 
Variance to allow two driveways 
Special Permit for a two bedroom apartment 

DENIED: Variance for a farmer's porch 

Variance to allow a two family house 
Special Permit for a non-profit country club 

The Board also heard one appeal of a decision of the Zoning Enforcing Officer 
and upheld his decision. 

The Appeals Board would like to give its sincere thanks for all the support and 
consideration it has received this past year from the Town Boards and the residents of 
Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert F. Sylvia, Chairman 
Burgess P. Standley, Secretary 
Stephen M. Nolan, Member 
Charles H. Peck, Associate 
Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. Associate 
Osier L. Peterson, Associate 



45 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Fiscal year 1995 reflected several improvements for the triennial certification of 
values undertaken by your board. The first came about due to increased housing starts 
during the last three years as well as an improved economy that caused increases in home 
sales and higher prices. The town, upon recommendation from the Selectmen and 
Assessors, voted at annual town meeting in April, to adopt the provisions of Chapter 653, 
section 40 Acts of 1989 amending Chapter 59 Section 2A (a) giving the second factor, an 
assessment date of July 1 rather than January 1 for valuing new construction. We 
therefore were able to add greatly to our new growth because new houses were nearer 
completion during spring months than in prior years. During the previous certification 
period this factor had not been as important because of the low construction level. This 
year it was advantageous, improving substantially new growth figures and the total 
assessed valuation. Finally, personal property values grew as a result of a change in 
personal property consultants. John Heaphy's method of calculation and on site visits 
did much to update our records on personal property. 

Once again we wish to thank our appraisal consultant, Assistant Assessor Stan 
Bergeron, for his continued efforts on behalf of the town of Medfield that made it 
possible to complete the certification process and have tax bills issued before December 
3 1 as mandated by state law. 

We appreciate the extra work required and accomplished by our staff, Marjorie 
Temple and Irene Hartling, to prepare certification procedures while continuing to serve 
the public. 

In other matters this year. Chairman Bill Walsh successfully completed the 
required courses to earn his designation as a Massachusetts Accredited Assessor (MAA). 
Carol Rossi also serves on the meeting site committee of the Massachusetts Assessing 
Officers. 

The board appointed a liaison to the Open Space Committee to work toward better 
communication and joint efforts to preserve both open space and the tax base. We 
encourage conservation restrictions on large, privately owned open spaces rather than 
outright purchase by the town. This philosophy was expressed by the board at the Long 
Range Planning symposium held in the spring. 

Upon the Assessors' recommendation the Selectmen voted not to classify the tax 
rate for various classes and so our values, totaling $904,521,675 were certified in 
November and a uniform tax rate of $14.28 was set for all classes of property. 

We thank you all for your patience and cooperation. The small number of 
complaints during this process seem to be a statement that you are becoming familiar 
with the triennial revaluation and accept it as inevitable or that our consultant does the job 
satisfactorily and equitably. 

Respectfully submitted, 
William D. Walsh, MAA 
Carol A. Rossi 
C.B. Doub, MAA 



46 



ARTS COUNCIL 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Arts Council continued its work to promote the arts in Medfield in 
1994. 

The Zullo Gallery in its seventh season held an exhibit called "Twenty-One Artists" 
from April 30 - June 18, 1994. This successful show featured 21 artists from the Boston 
area including local artists Dave Biedrzycki, Judy Fitzpatrick, Stephen Luecke, and Byron 
Reed. 

Plans are underway for five exhibits for the 1995 season and will include the 
first-ever student/faculty exhibit featuring artists from the Medfield School System. 

Storyteller/singer Davis Bates has been researching Medfield's history for a June 3, 
1995 concert that is tailored to local history. Bates' performance is funded by the 1993 
Massachusetts Arts Lottery funding cycle. 

The theater group's reading committee has been busy reading plays for a future 
production. "Blithe Spirit" and "From Five to Five Thirty" are under consideration. 

For the 1994 cycle, the Massachusetts Arts Lottery allocated $3978 to support the 
arts and humanities in Medfield. Awards granted by Medfield Arts Council this year were 
to: 

Medfield Arts Council: $1929 to fund a 1996 spring celebration of the arts in 
Medfield. 

Medfield State Hospital: $800 to co-sponsor a stai?7client art show at Medfield 
State Hospital, spring 1995. 

Don Bastarache: Music of World War II and the Swing Era: $950 to hold a 
dance at the American Legion Hall in Medfield on May 5, 1995. 

Neponset Choral Society: $100 for their 1994-1995 Concert Season. 

New members and new ideas are always welcomed by the council. The Arts 
Council wishes to thank the town of Medfield and its citizens for continuing to support the 
arts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lucinda Davis, Chairperson 
Steven Guy Philip B. Barnard 

Steven H. Cook Wendy Clarridge Corkum 

Connie Jones John Horgan 

Francis A. Iafolla William F. Pope 

47 



CABLE TV RENEWAL COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

1994 was an extremely busy and productive year for the Cable Television License 
Renewal Committee. The Medfield cable TV license with Cable Vision Industries ("CVI") 
of Foxboro and Liberty, NY, is due to expire in early 1995. Since September, we have 
been engaged in a series of complex negotiations, meeting about once every other week 
with Steve Grossman, CVTs General Manager in Foxboro, to work out the details of a 
new license to take us until the year 2005. 

To date, CVI has been very cooperative in trying to meet our cable television 
needs for the next ten years. We have had extensive discussions about consumer concerns 
and wishes, technical standards and improvements, public access programming and the 
needs of the public schools. We are confident that, by the time you read this report, a new 
license will be concluded and approved by both CVI and the Board of Selectmen, that will 
represent a substantial commitment by CVI to improved cable television in the Town of 
Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert Sawyer, Chairman 
C.B. Doub 
Robert Gibbs 
William Kean 
Thomas Sweeney 



48 






THE MEDFIELD COMMUNITY CABLE ACCESS 
CORPORATION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Community Cable Access Corporation is a private, non-profit 
corporation made up of the residential subscribers to the Medfield cable television system. 
We operate on channel 8 of the Medfield cable television network. It is our purpose to 
provide to the residents of Medfield the opportunity to participate in the local origination 
of cable television programming of local community interest, utilizing the studio and 
mobile facilities provided by the Town's licensee, CableVision Industries ("CVT') of 
Foxboro. 

During 1994, Cable 8 continued a steady growth of community cable access 
television in Medfield. Program Coordinator Dan Howell was instrumental in the 
development of several new and exciting programs. Unfortunately, Dan did such a good 
job that, in September, he was promoted to Program Coordinator for the Town of Sharon. 
In January, 1995, Mike Sweeney, another Medfield native and product of Cable 8, was 
hired as Program Coordinator. Good luck to both Dan and Mike in their new positions. 

We are especially proud of our winners this year at the Annual CVI Access 
Programming Awards, covering thirteen communities. This year, Tom Guilmette won 
first place for editing, and Cable 8 Medfield won first prize in the Education Category for 
our telecast of the high school graduation. Also, Tom Bozak was Medfield's Volunteer of 
the Year. Congratulations to both Tom's and to the volunteer crews whose hard work 
made these awards possible. 

1994 was a year of change for the Board of Directors. Both Anne Marie 
Battistone and Mike Sweeney served as President during the year, but, by year-end, Mike 
resigned from the Board in order to accept the Program Coordinator's job. We are 
looking for new people who are interested in getting active at Cable 8, by joining the 
Board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Christopher Allan, Director 

Thomas Bozak, Director 

C.B. Doub, Studio Administrator 

Raymond Neary, Director 

Robert Sawyer, Director 

Michael Sweeney, Program Coordinator 



49 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Civil Defense Director for the year ending 
December 31, 1994. 

The Civil Defense Director's responsibilities are to act as a liaison between the 
Selectmen and the Town Departments in the event of a declared emergency. As of 1988, 
the Civil Defense Director has actively participated in the HAZMAT Emergency Planning 
Committee in and outside of the town. 

The Civil Defense Director is also in charge of the Auxiliary Police Organization 
under the Chief of Police. 

In addition to our compulsory drills on July 4th and Halloween, the Auxiliary 
Police and Radio Operators were requested to assist in the following events during 1994: 

- Boston Marathon 

- Little League Parade 

- Memorial Day Parade 

- Annual Road Race 

- Medfield Day (MEMO) 

- Christmas Parade 

- Monthly RACES Drill 

The department has participated in training activities sponsored by the 
Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency and the Medfield Police Department* 
Patrols of town property were performed in conjunction with the Police Department on a 
regular basis. 

I wish to remind the people of Medfield that in an emergency it is possible to 
arrange for shelter and showers at one of the schools. 

Town residents interested in making use of our Civil Defense services or in 
membership should contact the Civil Defense Director at 359-4519. 

I would like to thank the men and women of the department for their cooperation 
throughout the year. Also, I wish to thank the Board of Selectmen, Michael Sullivan and 
his staff, and Police Chief Hurley. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Vincent M. Cellucci 

CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 



50 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Conservation Commission administers the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection 
Act, Mass. General Laws, Chapter 131, section 40, and the Medfield Wetlands bylaw. 
These laws seek to protect public surface and groundwater supplies and prevent damage 
from flooding by preserving floodplains and nature's great filters and sponges, our 
wetlands, swamps and bogs, streams and other water bodies, and certain types of land 
adjoining them. Anyone proposing to alter a wetland, or land subject to flooding, or to 
perform work within 100 feet of either, must file with the Commission. Before starting the 
work, the Commission must receive a determination that the Act: 

1. does not apply; 

2. applies and the work may be performed under conditions the 
Commission imposes; 

3. applies and may be performed without conditions. 

For the second year, the Commission has employed the Town's Conservation 
Agent, Leslee Willetts. This position is supported entirely by fees collected from 
applicants. Leslee works in the town house on Mondays and Thursdays from 9-2. She 
provides help to residents and applicants concerning the Conservation Commission and 
provides help to residents and applicants concerning the Conservation Commission and its 
work. Her technical expertise and enthusiasm has continued to be invaluable to the 
Commission in conducting independent site inspections, reviewing permit applications for 
accuracy and completeness, and functioning as the Commission's representative. 

Enforcement actions at the Southern Acres project that started in December 1993 
continued throughout 1994. An extensive series of meetings, site visits and review of 
engineering designs prepared by the proponent occupied the Commission more than any 
other project. The focus of this enforcement effort was the attempt to stop erosion on the 
site and the continuing siltation of Danielson Pond, the Stop River and its tributaries. 
Despite several failed attempts during the late winter, the site was finally stabilized by the 
end of 1994. This type of enforcement action could only be initiated after a problem has 
occurred since the work was not in the jurisdiction of the Commission. The Commission 
was aware of the high potential for erosion problems on the project as early as August 
1993, but could not act until after a severe storm in December 1993. At the end of 1994, 
the developer is still performing clean-up work in wetlands next to the Stop River. 

To prevent major erosion problems in the future, the Commission has proposed an 
Erosion and Sediment Control bylaw for the 1995 Town meeting. This bylaw will allow 
the Commission to require erosion controls on any large scale project in the Town. At 
present, no Town board controls development of individual lots from the perspective of 
preventing erosion. This type of land development work has many impacts beyond the 
obvious washing of soil into streams, wetlands and rivers throughout the Town. The 
erosion of soils during construction also clogs the Town's drainage system; changes 
characteristics of groundwater, which recharges all of the Town's wells; and can increase 
flooding in streams from siltation and increased water flows. One of the major issues of 

51 



concern to the Commission is the protection of surface and groundwater quality. The 
vulnerability of our groundwater supplies has recently been demonstrated by the 
contamination of two Town wells from volatile organic compounds. 

In 1994 the Commission's enforcement activities included an action to determine 
the cause and remedies for the drying out of two ponds, after the installation of 
underground pipelines in nearby streets. Enforcement actions were initiated against two 
land developers to determine the cause and corrective actions possible to return these 
valuable resources to their former condition. The search for solutions in these cases has 
continued into 1995. 

In addition to the regulatory responsibilities of the Commission, we have also 
provided financial support for the acquisition of open space parcels by paying some of the 
costs necessary to perform surveys and appraisals of land to be purchased and trails to be 
donated to the Town. The Commission's educational activities, with support form the 
Medfield Suburban Press, included a wetland photo contest to increase awareness of these 
environmentally sensitive areas. Two winners each received a one year subscription to the 
Suburban Press and a Suburban Press umbrella. The winning photos were also published 
in the paper. Also, several members of the Commission submitted educational articles to 
the Suburban Press to help the community understand various environmental issues. 

During the 1994 calendar year, the Commission issued the following formal 
decisions: Nine Determinations of Applicability; twenty-one Orders of Conditions; sixteen 
Certificates of Compliance; fifteen Extensions of Orders; and five enforcement actions. 

The Commission meets the first and third Thursdays of the month and at other 
times as necessary. The Commission also welcomes those interested in the work of the 
Commission as associates, particularly those with skills in environmental science and 
engineering. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert J. Ingram, Ph.D. Chairman 

John A. Thompson, Vice Chairman 

Robert T. Burns 

Craig S. Harwood 

Ann Lee Howell 

Ralph A. Parmigiane 

Neil E.E. Simone 

Douglas S. Sparrow, Associate Member 

Theresa A. Cos, Associate Member 

Betty A. Kaerwer, Associate Member 

Caroline D. Standley, Associate Member 

James G. White, Jr., Associate Member/Treasurer 



52 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The calendar year of 1994 again showed continuing growth in the workload for 
the Board of Health agents, staff members and our contracting agencies. Complicated 
repairs of septic systems constructed prior to Title 5 and of new requirements to be in 
effect in March of 1995 for Title 5 found our consulting agent/engineer spending more 
time supplying information and on consulting services. Our Sanitary Inspector likewise 
supplied many hours of consulting services to prospective business developers of food 
service establishments and to the School Building and Planning Committee for renovations 
at the High School. 

The Board of Health membership experienced changes in 1994 with the decision of 
two members to resign and/or not seek re-appointment. Neil MacKenzie, after serving on 
the board for ten years, decided not to seek re-appointment and Joan Willgohs also 
tendered her resignation due to health reasons. The board recognized and appreciated 
their many years of devoted services in their capacities as monitors of the town's public 
health. Appointment of new members, Debra Gursha and Walter Collins, was welcomed 
after a long search by the Board of Selectmen. Unfortunately, business responsibilities 
forced Mr. Collins to also tender his resignation after several months. The appointment of 
Nancy Silva as the third member once again gave the board its full membership. 

SANITATION: John J. Keefe, R.S., after serving as Board of Health agent for twenty 
years, submitted his resignation to the board. As agent for the board, he continued to 
make inspections of food service establishments and retail food stores, to give consultation 
and advice when requested and to investigate food related complaints. Public health issues 
dealing with school, highway, town administrative, police, fire and State Hospital 
personnel throughout the year received consultation time with Mr. Keefe. The Board of 
Health appreciates the many years of service and expertise which Mr. Keefe has supplied 
to the Town of Medfield. 

Under the provision of Chapter II of the State Sanitary Code covering minimum 
standards for human habitation, Mr. Keefe made inspections of dwelling units during the 
year which resulted from complaints and random inspections of rental housing. Where 
violations of the State Sanitary Code were found, the owner or occupant was ordered to 
take corrective action and follow-up inspections were made to insure compliance. Mr. 
Keefe also made additional inspections including the public bathing beach, semi public 
pools, laundromats, gas stations, shopping centers, the landfill and the transfer station. 
Regular inspections of school cafeterias and day care centers were carried out throughout 
the year. The board had extensive conversations and held educational meetings with the 
Park and Recreation Commission relative to Hinkley Swim Pond bringing it into 
compliance with Minimum Standards for Bathing Beaches (State Sanitary Code Chapter 
VII). 



53 



The Board of Health, recognizing their responsibility to protect and improve the health of 
the residents of the town, adopted Regulations in 1992 dealing with smoking in public 
places and workplaces and with the sale and distribution of tobacco products. These 
regulations called for all restaurants to be smoke-free by January 1, 1994. The end of 
1994 found compliance by all of the Food Service permit holders. 

The Board of Health, in conjunction with the Boards of Health of Dover, 
Needham, and Westwood, renewed their Tobacco Control Program contract for FY95 
and received a $72,250 award from the State Department of Public Health. The activities 
of the Tobacco Control Program for Dover, Medfield, Needham and Westwood are 
supported by the Health Protection fund established upon passage of voter referendum 
Question 1 (Tobacco Excise Tax) in November, 1992. The Tobacco Control Program is 
directing its effort in four areas: 

* tobacco use education and prevention 

* town policy, including tobacco regulations and laws regarding the sale 

of tobacco to minors 

* work-site smoking policy 

* smoking cessation programs 

Tobacco Control Program personnel are available to speak at organizational and 
community meetings and to staff display booths at health, educational, and business fairs. 
The Program can provide literature, pamphlets, posters and other materials covering such 
topics as the effects of tobacco use, smoking cessation, second-hand smoke, and the 
effects of smoking on children and teens. Slide shows, video tapes, displays, and 
educational models are available by loan from the Program. 

BOARD OF HEALTH PERMITS ISSUED : 

Restaurants, counter bars, cafeteria food 20 

service and vending machines 
Food stores and markets 8 

Temporary food service permits 7 

Bakeries 
Laundromats 
Funeral Director 
Tanning Facilities 
Limited food service (party room) 
Mobile Food Server 
Frozen dessert 
Ice cream truck 

Massage therapy (establishment) 
Massage therapy (individuals) 



ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING: 

As the town continues to experience growth and the number of residences 
increases, the load on our environment increases. Recognizing this, the Board of Health 
has been active in cooperation with other boards and committees, stressing the need for 

54 



proper management of the town's natural resources, particularly, the protection of our 
water resources. 

Our agent and consulting professional engineer, William R. Domey, has provided 
engineering assistance to town residents and reviewed plans for future development and 
met with other town boards and commissions. With storm water management regulations 
in effect, reviews of subdivision plans, plans for septic system designs for new 
construction, proposals for repairs of existing systems and drainage details for site plan 
review afford a greater protection of the environment. Such reviews constitute some of 
the many services rendered by the board engineer. In order to determine if sewage 
disposal systems are adequate for proposed alterations or additions to existing dwellings, 
the board adopted guidelines to obtain building permits and for inspections of existing 
septic systems to determine if they are in a state of failure. 



The following is a list of number of reviews and inspections and related permits 



issued: 



On-site soil test applications 29 

New plans submitted 39 

Disposal Works Construction Permits issued 38 

Construction inspections 176 

Repair permits issued 8 

Installers' permits issued 29 

Subdivision plan reviews 8 plans 

(Preliminary & Definitive) 

Well permits issued 

Septage Handler & Carters' permits issued 18 

Swimming pool reviews (private pools) 16 

Review of plans for additions & renovations 65 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

Jennifer Shaw, who serves as the town's Animal Inspector/ Animal Control Officer 
continues her dedicated service in the new combined position. Her report is contained 
separately in this town report. 

The threat of a Rabies epidemic has become a reality in Medfield with the 
identification of positive rabies cases in raccoons. The board continued their program to 
educate the citizens of the town to the disease, to the importance of staying away from 
wild animals and of having their domestic pets, especially cats, vaccinated. They also 
arranged for pre-exposure inoculations of all town personnel who might be exposed to 
possible rabid animals. The board cosponsored two clinics with the Medfield Humane 
Society, for the vaccination of cats and dogs. 



CONTRACTS WITH HUMAN SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEMS 

With funding through the Medfield Board of Health, the South Norfolk County 
Association for Retarded Citizens ("SNCARC") provides and supports services to citizens 
of Medfield who are mentally retarded. The Association is a non-profit, 

55 



membership-based organization of more than 500 members, governed by family members 
of those we serve, including community residents on the Board of /Directors, Eight types 
of programs serve Medfield residents as follows: 

1. Vocational Training through Lifework's Employment Services in Norwood 

serving Medfield residents; 

2. Lifework's Day Habitation and NCE Pre-vocational program in Norwood 

serving Medfield residents; 

3 . Community Residential Facilities serving Medfield residents; 

4. Family Support/ Advocacy to all Medfield families who request; 

5. Social Recreational and Special Olympics for people with disabilities; 

6. Respite care in Medfield families' homes in their homes, plus after school, 

weekends, and summer camp programs for Medfield children; 

7. Elder Services to Medfield citizens who are elderly and disabled; 

8. Clinical Services through Harbor Counseling, and Education Center 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

The Walpole Area VNA has had a moderate 12% visit growth during the calendar 
year 1994, achieving approximately 72,000 visits for the entire area. Costs have remained 
among the lowest in the state. Accreditation for the agency by the National League of 
Nursing Community Health Accreditation Program was received in October. In addition 
to established services, Walpole VNA increased its offerings of childbirth education 
classes, breast-feeding classes, prenatal and postnatal exercise classes, and cholesterol 
screenings. The Infant/Toddler Safety Class and CPR certification is available to new 
parents. A new Breast Feeding Hotline was established in late fall. Office hours are held 
daily at the Walpole, 55 West Street, office. The Mental Health Program offers 
psychiatric nursing care to clients with mental health problems who are having difficulty 
coping and are unable to access existing services. Walpole VNA continues to provide 
programs in Health Promotion to all age groups in addition to traditional home health 
services. The four major components of the Health Promotion Program are: Health 
Maintenance for the elderly, Maternal/Child Health; Communicable Disease and Public 
Health. 

The Town of Medfield Public Health Statistics for 1994 are as follows: 



SERVICE 


VISITS 


VISITS 




1993 


1994 


Home Visits/Health Maintenance 


114 


185 


Maternal/Child Health Visits 


6 


8 


Office Visits 


29 


23 


Communicable Disease follow up 


6 


3 


Senior Citizen Clinics 


211 


249 


Flu Clinic 


247 


233 


OUTREACH PROGRAM 







The Medfield Youth Outreach program, administered by the Board of Health and 
advised by the Outreach Advisory Committee, continues to be a program supported by the 
town The focus of the Outreach position has traditionally been and remains crisis 

56 



intervention and prevention, short and some long term counseling, information and 
referrals, community and client liaison, advocacy and the Peer Counseling/Leadership 
program. The confidential services are offered free of charge to Medfield youth and their 
families. Elizabeth Newton completed her fourth year as director of the program in 
October. 

In 1994 clients were referred to the Outreach office by the school (17%), police 
(5%), family members (24%), self (38%), and other sources (16%) including clergy, local 
professionals, and state agencies. In most cases concerning minor children, parents or 
other family members became involved in meetings. Clinical supervision for the Outreach 
Worker was provided bi-monthly by Dimension House counselor, Thomas Hughart. 
Consultations with school personnel, police, other service providers, and community 
agencies occurred regularly. Major issues dealt with throughout the calendar year 
included: 

parent/child conflict griefloss 

substance abuse issues teenage pregnancy 

financial difficulties depression 

eviction/homelessness child abuse/neglect 

juvenile delinquency parental alcoholism 

self esteem issues anger/agression 

parenting skills rape 

runaway parent/child conflicts 

attempted suicide school difficulties 

The Peer Counseling program continues to be a success. Students are trained to 
provide assistance, support and improved listening skills for peers in town. After 
completing the training, Peer Counselors are available to help orientate all new students to 
the high school, including the freshmen class and to work with younger students in a "Big 
Buddy" capacity. The Outreach Worker is responsible for recruiting and selecting all 
Peer Counselors, developing and administering all training and meetings and has overall 
supervision of the program consulting with individual Peer Counselors as they work within 
their match-ups. The Outreach worker also shares equal responsibility in leading the Peer 
Leadership program which involves the Peer Counselors and Peer Educators (a drug and 
alcohol program in the high school). 

In 1994 the Outreach office served a number of additional functions in the 
community. The office served as a site for eligible residents to apply for the Good 
Neighbor Energy Fund and South Middlesex Opportunity Council fuel assistance 
programs. The Medfield Alcohol and Other Drug Advisory Council (MAODAC), on 
which the Outreach Worker acted as a co-chair, had three main goals: to serve as the 
Health Advisory Committee for the schools health grants; to support the all night 
graduation party; and to organize Medfield's first Drug Free Weekend. The weekend was 
a success, with many local organizations, groups and businesses coming together to 
increase awareness of alcohol and other drug related issues. The Outreach Worker also 
became an active participant in the District Attorney's Office roundtable meetings on 
domestic violence. She continued to work with the coordinator of the Tobacco Control 
Program in recruiting teenagers to do compliance checks and was trained to run the 
Tobacco Free Teens cessation program in 1995. 



57 



The Outreach worker participates in a number of organizations on a regular basis 
including: Association of Municipal Administrators of Youth and Family Services 
(AMAYFS) where she was elected as a member of the administrative board, the Youth 
Advisory Commission, the Board of Directors of the Massachusetts Peer Helpers 
Association, the All Night Graduation Party Executive Committee, the Medfield Home 
Committee, and the planning committee for Call to Excellence. 

The Outreach office is located on the upper second floor of the Town Hall. The 
telephone number is 359-7121 and messages may be left 24 hours a day. Informational 
brochures on a variety of issues are available at the office. 

The Board of Health normally holds its meetings on the second and fourth 
Wednesday evenings at 6:30 P.M. on the second floor of Town Hall. These meetings are 
open to the public and citizens are invited to attend and participate. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Heidi GrofF, Chairman 
Debra Gursha, Clerk 
Nancy Silva 



58 



MEDFIELD HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Historical Commission is appointed by the Board of Selectmen. It has 
a $600 budget and limited statutory authority. Its monthly meetings in the town house, 
usually on the third Thursday of each month, are open to the public 

The Medfield Historical Society, with which the Commission is often confused, is a 
private, not-for-profit organization, its membership includes Medfield history buffs across 
the country The Society holds monthly meetings/programs in the vestry of the Unitarian 
church, which happens to be in the National Register of Historic Places. The Historical 
Society building behind the library on Pleasant Street is open for historical research and 
good fellowship most Saturday mornings 

The Massachusetts Historical Commission was set up by the state legislature in 
1963 to identify, evaluate, and protect the Commonwealth's important historical and 
archaeological assets The local historical commission is responsible for ensuring that 
preservation concerns are considered in community planning and development decisions. 
The Medfield Historical Commission was established in 1973. 

DEMOLITION DELAY 

The Demolition Delay bylaw, passed at the 1993 Annual Town Meeting, assures no 
historically significant structure is torn down before serious efforts have been made to 
rehabilitate or restore it. In 1994, a town meeting vote extended the bylaw to protect 
archaeologically sensitive areas. 

Building and demolition permits are issued by the building inspector. Under the 
bylaw, before issuing a demolition permit on a building over 50 years old, he must notify the 
Historical Commission. We review the application. 

To date, four buildings more than 50 years old have come up for consideration as a 
result of this bylaw. The Commission found no historical value to three of the structures, so 
the building inspector issued demolition permits without delay. 

However, the Commission felt differently about the old Pine Tree Farm barn on 
Route 27 opposite Plain Street. We invoked the Demolition Delay bylaw after a public 
hearing in November, 1993 and designated the barn a "preferably preserved" structure. 
Despite the owner's advertising and other efforts throughout 1994, no one came forth to 
buy and move or rehabilitate the barn. Therefore, it was scheduled to be demolished in 
January, 1995. 

Although the Commission regrets that it was necessary to take the barn down, we 
are satisfied that the bylaw fulfilled its purpose: preservation was given a chance. 



59 



ARCHAEOLOGY ADVISORY COMMISSION 

The archaeology advisory subcommittee was formed to help protect 
archaeologically-sensitive areas in town. The group's chair is Barbara Palson; members are 
Deborah Gaines, Charlotte Reinemann, Richard Reinemann, Burgess Standley, John 
Thompson, Electa Tritsch, David Wilmarth, and Jacqueline Wile, along with Frederica 
Dimmick, field archaeologist, and Paul Gardescu of the Wayland Archaeology Group. 

The first meeting was held March 1, 1994. Monthly meetings are held at the town 
house the third Tuesday of each month. 

Some members of the committee met weekly through most of the year to pinpoint 
on a map Native American sensitive areas, historical buildings, and industry sites within the 
town from contact period through the present. Resources are outside professionals pro 
bono, town residents, and members and resources of the Medfield Historical Society. 

Artifacts brought to the committee by local citizens will be evaluated by 
professionals and registered with the Massachusetts Historical Commission in some 
instances. Several artifacts have been received. 

Establishment of a section on archaeology at the town library is underway. The 
committee has participated in site walkovers, a building permit release, the town well 
archaeology site survey, the sixth grade class dig, and on various town committees. 
Members have received training through meetings at the Massachusetts Historical 
Commission, the Massachusetts Archaeological Society, and the Robbins Museum in 
Middleborough, as well as through hands-on participation at a Native American site. 

MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL 

By a 1994 town meeting vote, Medfield State Hospital's 228-acre campus was 
designated a historic district. The Historic District Commission's report, found elsewhere in 
this town report, has the details. 

HISTORIC PRESERVATION AWARD 

Last summer, the Commission honored the extraordinary work of William and Ann 
Krawec in their meticulous and authentic restoration of the 200-year-old Daniel Sanders 
house at 402 Main Street with our annual historic preservation award. This house — one of 
Medfield's architectural treasures — had been owned for many years by the late Laura 
Smith, a teacher and active member of the Historical Commission and Historical Society. 



60 



MEDFIELD TOWN ARCHIVES 

One of the Historical Commission's very-long-term goals is to establish a town 
archives. In 1994 the Commission's archiving subcommittee (Deborah Kelsey, Richard 
Reinemann, and David Wilmarth) continued cataloguing the contents of the town hall safe. 
Some records date back to the town's founding in 1651. 

SPECIAL THANKS 

Three long-time Historical Commission members have decided to step back and take 
reduced roles. Donald MacDonald and David Wilmarth were charter members who 
contributed greatly over 20 years to historic preservation in Medfield. Paul Nyren was the 
long-time treasurer and played a key role in the restoration of the grist mill near Kingsbury 
Pond. 

WE WANT YOUR PARTICIPATION 

We sometimes have turnover in the Commission as members' personal 
circumstances change; we always try first to fill vacancies from the ranks of the associate 
members. There is no limit to the number of associate members we can have; let us know if 
you would like to be appointed. The only requirements are an interest in local history, and 
Medfield residency. 



Respectfully submitted 

Richard L. Reinemann, Chairman 
David F. Temple , Treasurer 
Priscilla E. Batting, Secretary 
Deborah Kelsey, Member 
Barbara Palson, Member, 
Burgess P. Standley, Member 
Michael Taylor, Member 
Eleanor Anes, Associate Member 
Richard DeSorgher, Associate Member 
David L. Wilmarth, Associate Member 
Thompson S. Lingel, Associate Member 
Donald J. MacDonald, Associate Member 
Charlotte H. Reinemann, Associate Member 
John A. Thompson, Associate Member 
Electa Kane Tritsch, Associate Member 



61 



MEDFIELD HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Purpose and Scope of Historic District Commission 

The Historic District Commission administers the Town's two Historic Districts: 
(1) the John Metcalf Historic District, which was created in 1989 around four historic 
homes on West Main Street (including the old portion of Vine Lake Cemetery) and, (2) 
the Hospital Farm Historic District, which was established this past year. 

Authority to create Historic Districts and the accompanying governing body is 
granted under The Historic Districts Act of 1960, Massachusetts Laws, Chapter 40C, as 
amended. The purpose of this Law is three fold: (1) to preserve and protect the 
distinctive characteristics of buildings and places significant in the history of the 
Commonwealth and its cities and towns; (2) to maintain and improve the settings of 
those buildings and places; and (3) to encourage new designs compatible with existing 
buildings in the district. 

Under Chapter 40C, communities can create Local Historic Districts to protect the 
character of their historic areas. Such districts are governed by town-appointed Local 
Historic District Commissions. Within a Local Historic District, no building shall be 
constructed or altered in a way that affects exterior architectural features unless the Local 
Historic Commission has issued a certificate of appropriateness, a certificate of 
non-applicability or a certificate of hardship with respect to such alteration. Since each 
home within such a district contributes to the overall historic character, changes made to 
the exterior of any property, as well as new construction, are reviewed for the impact they 
may have on the district as a whole. 

Historic districts do not prevent changes from occurring, nor do they prevent new 
construction. The intent is to make changes and additions harmonious, and prevent the 
intrusion of incongruous elements that might distract from the aesthetic and historic values 
of the district. The purpose of any local historic district is not to halt growth, but to 
allow for thoughtful consideration of change. 

There are a number of misconceptions regarding Historic Districts in Medfield. 
For instance, if you live in an Historic District, do you need permission from the 
Commission to paint your house a new color? What about if you want to build a terrace, 
walk or driveway 9 Rebuild a roof? Install storm doors and windows? What about 
lighting 9 What if you want to remodel your kitchen? The Historic District Commission in 
Medfield has absolutely no jurisdiction over any of these matters. Furthermore, interior 
work is your business. 

The Historic District Commission does involve itself with exterior features, 
assuming you live in an historic district, and only those features that can be seen from a 
public way. 



62 



The Historic District Commission is not the same as the Historical Commission, 
although members from both organizations are appointed by the Board of Selectmen and 
both organizations have similar goals of protecting historical assets in Medfield. A third 
historical organization in town, The Medfield Historical Society, is a private not-for-profit 
organization unrelated to town government. Many of the members of one organization 
belong to another and some to all three. 

Medfield State Hospital Historic District 

The major accomplishment of the Historic District Commission in 1994 was the 
creation of the 228-acre Medfield State Hospital Historic District, which was approved 
during last year's Annual Town Meeting by more than a two-thirds majority. 

The Medfield State Hospital Campus includes 33 buildings, most of which were 
built at the turn of the century in a late Victorian style of architecture called Queen Anne. 
Many were designed by well-known Boston architects William Pitt Wentworth or Park & 
Kendall. The campus seems today like a turn-of-the-century college built around a New 
England town common with a chapel. One interesting feature is that all the buildings that 
face each other on the long sides of the common are mirror-images of each other. 

The Medfield State Hospital Historic District also includes the surrounding fields, 
which were farmed by Medfield's early settlers and before that by Native Americans. 

The creation of this new historic district would not have been possible without the 
support of the State Hospital Reuse Committee and Historical Commission. All three 
organizations plan to continue to work together over the next year to continue to protect 
the buildings, most which are being neglected because of budgetary problems at the state 
level. 

New Commission Members: 

This year the Town of Medfield appointed four new members to the Historical 
Commission representing a variety of backgrounds. As required by the Medfield Historic 
District Bylaw, the Board of Selectmen is to appoint Commission members that represent 
the interest of the Medfield Historical Society; the Chapter of the American Institute of 
Architects; the Massachusetts Board of Realtors and the Medfield Planning Board. In 
addition, if possible, one member shall be a resident or owner in the John Metcalf Historic 
District. 

All of these objectives were achieved with the appointments of the following 
individuals to the commission: David SharfTis a professional architect who serves on the 
Town Planning Board; Diane Nightingale is a real estate professional who has sold 
properties in Medfield for the past nine years; Michael Taylor is a Curator of the Medfield 
Historical Society and lives in one of four homes in the John Metcalf Historic District; 
Mike Standley represents a number of interests having served on numerous Town Boards 
over the years including the Open Space Committee and The Hospital Reuse Committee; 
finally, Don MacDonald provides the Commission with a sense of perspective having 
served on the Commission since its inception in 1989. 



63 



Special thanks to Richard DeSorgher, Stephen M. Nolan, John Hooper and Paul 
E. Nyren, Jr. for their many years of service on the Commission. 

Current Year Focus: 

In the current year, in addition to helping to preserve the Medfield State Hospital 
Historic District, the Historic District Commission will be identifying and evaluating 
potential new historic districts or the possibility of expanding the two existing ones. If 
you have any ideas or suggested historic districts we welcome your comments and 
participation in this organization. Your support is critical to our success. 

Respectively submitted, 

Michael Taylor, Chairperson 
Mike Standley, Secretary 
Donald MacDonald 
Diane Nightingale 
David Sharff 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Housing Authority is pleased to submit its Annual Report for 1994. 

The Authority is authorized by and operates under the provisions of Chapter 12 IB 
of the Massachusetts General Laws. It is entirely funded through the Executive Office of 
Communities and Development and is responsible to EOCD for the management of 
elderly/disabled housing. 

For information and/or application for housing at Tilden Village, please contact the 
Executive Director, Louise R. Galante, at 359-6454, Monday through Friday, from 9:00 
a.m. to 2:00 p.m. 

The Medfield Housing Authority meets regularly on the fourth Wednesday of each 
month at 7:30 p.m. in the office of the Executive Director at Tilden Village, 30 Pound 
Street. The general public is welcome to attend these meetings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Jordan, Chairman 
James T. Regan, Treasurer 
Janelle Schveighoffer, Secretary 
Mary Rogers, Commissioner 
Valerie Mariani, Commissioner 

64 



INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is our annual report for the year ending December 31, 1994: 

DEPARTMENT PERMITS INSPECTIONS INCOME EXPENSES 

1993 1994 1993 1994 1993 1994 1993 1994 

BUILDING 299 307 1256 1713 $79,939 5103,848 $28,973 $32,533 

PLUMBING 207 246 281 354 12,892 17,236 5,077 6,593 

GAS 179 222 167 268 5,569 7,268 3,016 5,066 

WIRING 330 396 712 885 20,458 29,485 13,024 16,514 

Total revenue from the issuance of permits and fees for inspections for the calendar 
year 1994, was $157,836.00 as compared to $120,079.00 in 1993. Expenses for 1994 
were $60,706.00 as compared to $50,090.00 in 1993. 

BUILDING INSPECTION 

A breakdown of building permits issued is listed below: 

New single family dwellings 97 

Multi Family (Condo's) 

Complete partially finished single dwellings 1 

Additions to private dwellings 64 

Renovations to private dwellings 65 
Additions & renovations to business and 

industrial buildings 19 

New industrial/business buildings 1 

Family Apartments 1 

2 Family Apartments 

Reshingling roof & installation of sidewalls 12 

Private swimming pools 16 

Accessory buildings 5 

Residential garages 5 

Demolitions 5 

Tents (temporary) & Construction trailers 2 

Signs 1 

Stoves (solid fuel burning/chimneys) 13 

Carnival 

TOTAL 307 



Occupancy certificates were issued for 51 new residences in 1994 as compared to 
39 in 1993. 

Inspections for certification of business, schools, multi-family dwellings, nursing 
homes and nursery schools amounted to 35 inspections for 1994. 

Estimated construction costs on permits issued: 





1993 


1994 


New Dwellings 


$14,714,530. 


$18,973,524. 


Renovations & additions, pools, 






shingling, sidewalls, etc. on 






residential 


2,207,819. 


2,376.183 


New construction business 






and industry 


-0- 


139.800. 


Renovations & additions business 






and industry 


1,346,085. 


4,185,623. 


Multi-family buildings 


1, 080,000. 


-0- 


Two Family Dwellings 


-0- 


-0- 


Family apartments 


19,000. 


100,000. 



Enforcement of the State Building Code continues to be the responsibility of the 
local building inspectors. Legislation effective 7/1/92 requiring contractors to be registered 
with the Commonwealth became the responsibility of the Inspection Department staff to 
institute procedural changes for compliance. The office of the Inspection Department also 
keeps an accurate registration of builders holding State Construction Supervisor's licenses 
in order to assure compliance with Section 109.1.1 of the State Building Code. The 
building inspectors continue the enforcement to the code by making inspections of 
schools, churches and rest homes as well as other places of assembly on a periodic basis. 

The Inspector of Buildings also serves the town in the capacity of Enforcing 
Officer for Zoning and as such, made 48 inspections to investigate complaints and 
inquiries brought to his attention by residents as well as other town boards and 
departments. 

The assistance and cooperation of Fire Chief Kingsbury during inspections was 
greatly appreciated. The Fire Chief and the Inspectors continue to inspect smoke 
detectors in new construction and in additions and renovations as well as inspecting the 
installation of solid fuel burning appliances. Residents are reminded of the importance of 
having their wood stove installations inspected and certified in accordance with 
requirements of the Massachusetts State Building Code. 

PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION 

The purpose of the position of the Plumbing and Gas Inspector is to administer, 
investigate and enforce the Uniform State Plumbing Code and State Fuel Gas Code. 
Unlike other trades, homeowners cannot be issued plumbing or gas permits. They can 
only be issued to a licensed Journeyman or a Master Plumber. Plumbing or gas cannot be 
installed, altered, removed, replaced, or repaired until a permit has been issued by the 
Inspector of Plumbing or Gas. The Inspection Department will be glad to help you make 
the determination concerning the need for plumbing and gas permits. When a citizen of 

66 



the town requests the plumber or gas fitter to apply for a permit, he is getting the 
assurance that the installation will not only be installed correctly and safely, but also that 
the work will be installed by a professional and not exploited by non professionals. It is 
definitely in the homeowners interest to insist on inspections by qualified town inspectors 
knowledgeable in their trade. It is money well spent in times where every penny counts. 
All inspectors are issued Medfield Photo Identification Cards. Remember to ask them for 
their I.D. before allowing them to enter your home. 

The Plumbing Code is constantly being changed and upgraded to try to give the 
consumer and the plumber a direction that will assure a safe installation. Of great concern 
lately is the installation of backflow prevention devices, where necessary, to insure the 
continuance of the good clean potable water of which we are very proud in Medfield. 

WIRING INSPECTION 

The Wiring Inspector continues to enforce the Massachusetts Electric Code as 
well as the National Electric Code in his inspections of electric installations for which 
permits are issued. Residents are reminded that the permitting process is in effect to 
assure safe and correct installations. The inspectors spend many hours giving answers to 
questions and advice to homeowners relative to electrical work. The assistance of Tauno 
Aalto and James Leonard during the periodic absences of the Wiring Inspector was greatly 
appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John P. OToole, Inspector of Buildings 
Anthony Calo, Local Insp. of Buildings 
Joseph F. Erskine, Inspector of Wires 
John A. Rose Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 



67 



KINGSBURY POND COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The January , 1994 meeting optimistically outlined seven objectives for the coming 
work year. Of the seven, good progress has been made on four with primary emphasis on 
the grounds rather than the mill itself. In 1995 we hope to complete the major outside 
projects and move inside the mill for work on the turbine. 

Front . The old fence received some new boards and a coat of red paint. A cable 
was installed across the driveway to keep vehicles off the dam. The parking area was 
lightly graded both for appearance and in an effort to gain a little more space. The 
unsightly pile of huge stones was used to build the new retaining wall for the ramp. 

Mill . A sturdy barricade was constructed over the sluice exit from under the mill. 
This was built of heavy chainlink fencing which allows water to flow through, and 
hopefully keeps trespassers out. In the headrace, the floor for the water impoundment box 
was constructed by Richard Ostrander using the white oak planks sawn by the Leland 
sawmill in Sherborn. This floor rests on large cross-timbers previously installed on the 
"grade" of the original wooden sluice. Two more upright telephone poles were added to 
the four in place to provide support for the box itself - the next item to be built. It had 
been planned to complete this box, cut the poles to ground level, and build the new 
"bridge" (cover) during this work season, but time ran out. In addition to the white oak 
sawn in 1993, several red oak logs were donated this year and these, too, have been sawn 
into planks and stacked at the Waste Treatment Plant. 

Rear . Tailrace east wall. Joseph Comeau has taken as his project the repair of this 
wall, and a section 47" high and 25' long has been completed. In conjunction with this 
rebuilding two problems were addressed. First, the water flowing through the previously 
installed pipe was draining down the outside of the wall creating a messy appearance. To 
correct this, a deep drywell was incorporated into the new wall to collect and direct this 
water to the bottom of the race. Second, the new stonework covered the exposed end of 
this pipe, making a neat, solid facing. Sometime ago an early, secondary, wall had been 
discovered. When the new wall reached its final height, it was tied to this early wall (one 
foot higher) with a four-foot wide set-back, thus creating an attractive low terrace. 

Ramp . From the earliest days there appears to have been a ramp leading from dam 
level down and around to the back of the mill. Over time, the retaining wall had become 
rather decrepit, and a leak had seeped into the area at the base of the ramp. The leak has 
been re-directed, and the soil dried out so that work could begin on a new retaining wall. 
The loose and fallen stones were removed and the soil facing squared up. Armand 
Janjigian of Medfield's Black Russian Farm donated many hours with his backhoe making 
it possible to use the large, rough-cut stone removed from the front to build this ramp 
well. A 64-foot section has been completed, ranging in height from seven feet near the 
stone steps by the mill to one foot at the end. In layout the wall incorporates two 
set-backs totaling four feet, and the top line curves around to tie into the second terrace 
level. This job is not fully complete as more chinking and backfilling are necessary, but a 

68 



very sturdy wall is in place. The terraces will also serve as seating for future events and 
school lectures. 

Public Relations . On June 4 the mill was open to the public for "Trolley Day", and 
was quite successful, with 23 visitors and $29.00 in contributions. It was also open for 
Medfield Day, and was quite unsuccessful with only three visitors. 

Teacher Richard DeSorgher J s eighth grade bike tour of the Town included a stop 
at the mill. On five days in September and October, different groups were given tours. 
The water supply and intake, grist stone, gears, control, turbine and milling operation 
were discussed. Also covered was the timber frame construction of the building noting 
the hand-hewn beams and wooden peg fastenings. To have the mill included among the 
historic sites visited by the students is very gratifying. 

Budg et. In an effort to add to our income of "can and bottle" money from the 
recycling bins at the Transfer Station, and donations, it was decided to have something to 
sell at Medfield Day. The item chosen was a coffee mug - dark blue with gold design. 
The artwork was done by Lori Zegarelli, as well as ordering of the mugs and handling 
selling. The preparation of the artwork, however, raised the question of a "name" for the 
mill. Capt. Joseph Clark was the first (18th century) to build and operate a mill on the 
site, and George W. Kingsbury 20th century) was the last to upgrade and operate this mill; 
thus, Clark-Kingsbury Grist Mill was felt appropriate and was used in the logo. The order 
of mugs was sold out, so the effort could be considered a success. We continue to 
operate in the black with the only Town contribution being a one-third share of the 
"bottle" money. 

In Appreciation . The Committee would like to thank Barletta Construction for the 
large, rought-cut stone from the old Walpole train bridge; Al Brennan for his donation of 
cut-stone slabs; Michael Egan of Carruth Capital Corporation for red oak logs; 
"Neighbor" Tim Shannon for his labor on the rock wall and helping on Medfield Day; and 
residents who have made contributions to this restoration project. As always, thanks to 
the Medfield Public Works Department for its continuing assistance. 

All interested residents are invited to our irregularly scheduled meetings, prior 
notices of which are posted at Town Hall. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Michael Cronin, Chairman 

Michael Sullivan, Treasurer 

Barbara Leighton, Secretary 

Joseph Comeau 

Armand Janjigian 

Paul Nyren 

Richard Ostrander 

Paul Simpson 

Lori Zegarelli 

Thompson Lingel, Associate Member 



69 



LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Long Range Planning Committee (LRPC), appointed by the Planning Board, 
studies and makes recommendations on long-range issues driven by changes in land use 
and population growth and demographics. In 1994, the Long Range Planning Committee 
sponsored a town forum and a workshop, researched and proposed potential changes to 
the Town Bylaws, and has started to assemble information from Town boards and 
departments to prepare a Community Action Statement (CAS), while individual members 
served on the Open Space Committee and the Sewer Master Plan Update Committee. 

Forum : On May 16, the Long Range Planning Committee hosted the second open 
Town Forum, entitled "Medfield's Window to the Future; Changes, Challenges, and 
Choices". The purpose of the Forum was to promote a constructive exchange of ideas 
and concerns among town officials and residents concerning current projects, and 
long-range goals for addressing the challenges facing Medfield, particularly those arising 
from continued development and increased demands on Medfield's infrastructure. Nine 
presentations by town officials focused on the following three questions: 

What are your most pressing challenges today? 

What aid and tools are needed to help you meet these challenges? 

What is your Board's perspective on the Medfield of the future? 

Questions and observations from the audience that arose from these presentations 
were moderated by the League of Women Voters. 

Workshop : The Long Range Planning Committee sponsored a Fiscal Workshop 
on October 19. The goal of the workshop was to communicate the most important 
problems and opportunities ahead, to better enable the leadership of Medfield to formulate 
financial strategies. Seven town committees and boards, and Medfield's State 
Representatives joined Town Administrator Michael Sullivan in addressing capital 
budgeting, revenue forecasting, infrastructure maintenance, education reform, and state 
and federal mandates. 

Bylaw Review : Members of the Long Range Planning Committee worked with 
the Planning Board on five Zoning Bylaw revisions for Town Meeting. Review of 
potential modifications to the bylaws will continue in 1995 in conjunction with updating 
Medfield's Master Plan. 

Community Action Statement : The Long Range Planning Committee is presently 
coordinating the compilation of information required to submit a Community Action 
Statement (CAS) to the state. The Community Action Statement is a locally-produced 
planning and program administration tool designed to assist local policy-makers in 
evaluating municipal needs and setting priorities. It is also a three-year action plan that 
communities file with the Executive Office of Communities & Development (EOCD) in 
order to be eligible for most of the assistance programs offered through the Division of 

70 



Community Services. Last year, the Community Action Statement was required for the 
Community Development Fund, the Ready Resource Fund, the Housing Development 
Support Program, and the Municipal Incentive Grants. 

This year, the Long Range Planning Committee also used a booth at Medfield Day 
secured by the Planning Board to display maps and charts depicting recent growth trends, 
and raised funds to establish a consultation fund to augment planning studies. "Medfield" 
hats printed for the occasion were sold out, apparently underscoring the continued interest 
in landuse/planning that was so strongly voiced the previous year. 

Preliminary activities aimed at updating the Master Plan are underway. The 
existing plan is 30 years old, and the last update was completed 15 years ago. The Long 
Range Planning Committee has begun to formulate a survey for distribution to residents, 
and has identified interest in the schools for the involvement of students in tabulating the 
responses. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Andrea C. Costello, Co-Chairman 

Burgess P. Standley, Co-Chairman 

Gregory A. Beedy 

Peter Fellman 

Margaret M. Gryska 

Timothy P. Sullivan 

David G. Strimaitis 

Geralyn M. Warren 

Denise Yurkofsky 



71 



MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

It is my pleasure to submit the annual report for the year 
1994. The long established trend of increased use of the 
library by town citizens continued in 1994. Record circula- 
tion occurred once again with 131,324 materials borrowed. 
This represented an increase of 12% over 1993 circulation. 

The focus for much of the year was centered on planning for a 
larger, more functional, and more useful library for the 
citizens of Medfield. The scope of the project grew in mid- 
year after the passage of a bill by the state legislature 
making $45,000,000 available to support public library j 
construction throughout the state. One of the criteria for 
awarding grants, which will underwrite almost 50% of the cost 
of construction, is that a library building must be designed 
to meet the needs of a community for the next 20 years. The 
Library Trustees consulted with the Board of Selectmen and 
members of the Warrant Committee who agreed that it was 
prudent to enlarge the design of the library given the 
opportunity for state funding. A great deal of time was 
spent working with Stahl Associates, the architectural firm 
selected to draw up the schematic design. Approval to move 
the project forward will be sought at the next town meeting. 

The use of technology in the library expanded during 1994. 
Several additional terminals connected to the Minuteman 
Library Network were added in the circulation area, printers 
now issue date due receipts listing the titles of all 
materials borrowed, the telecommunication link to the central 
Minuteman computer is now over digital lines, new CD-ROM 
products were added to the workstation in the reference area, 
and the Friends of the Library purchased a multimedia 
computer with a CD-ROM drive for the children's room. The 
library has access to the Internet through its association 
with Minuteman, and the reference staff received training on 
accessing the many informational databases available on the 
Internet. 

The collection of materials grew significantly during the 
year thanks to a $5,000 collection development grant awarded 
by the state and generous funding from the Friends of the 
Library which supplemented town funds. The nonfiction and 
reference collections were greatly enhanced, the video 
collection more than tripled in size, and almost every area 
of the children's collection was expanded. In all, 3,988 new 
materials were added to the collection during 1994. 

The meeting room hosted many programs and workshops through- 
out the year, both library sponsored events and others 
involving community nonprofit groups. The meeting room also 
serves as a gallery for art exhibits, which are hung on a 
monthly basis. The smaller private room adjacent to the 
meeting room provides space for literacy training tutors to 
meet with their students. 

72 



The children's room remains a bustling and vibrant area, 
drawing children back to it again and again. With a greatly 
expanded collection of materials from which to choose, young 
readers go home with armloads of exciting new books, videos, 
and audio tapes. During their visit to the library they can 
perform in the puppet theater, construct a vast railway 
system with the wooden train set, "cook" in the kitchenette, 
or find the fish in the aquarium. A vast array of interesting 
and fun programs were conducted throughout the year, 
including a very successful summer reading program which 
concluded with a music fest provided by students from the New 
England Conservatory of Music. We are extremely grateful to 
the Friends of the Library for underwriting the cost of craft 
materials used in the children's programs, for funding 
special children's performers, and for providing funds to 
purchase so many fine children's materials. The children's 
room is a very special place because of the outstanding work 
done by children's librarian, Cate Shier. 

Cooperation with the schools continued throughout the year. 
Many teachers notify the library when assignments are made, 
so that the library staff can more ably assist students. 
Reserve books are often set aside for use in the library when 
large class assignments are made, and from time to time 
deposit collections from the public library are sent to the 
school libraries. Conversely, during the summer, the school 
libraries send books on the summer reading lists to the 
public library. 

The Medfield Public Library was delighted to be selected as 
the recipient of funds raised by the sale of the beautiful 
Medfield Blanket designed by local artist, Seddon Wylde. The 
blanket offers a visual history of the town and comes with a 
descriptive tag. 

The library is grateful for the many contributions made by 

town businesses and organizations throughout the year. The 

spirit of giving is abundant. Thanks is also given to the 

volunteers who worked at the library during the year, and 

special thanks is given to Hillary Carey who presented the 

children's room with an exquisitely hand painted table and 
chairs as part of a scout project. 

My personal thanks is extended to the Library Trustees who 
have worked exceedingly hard this year on the library 
building project. Their commitment and dedication is of the 
highest order. I would also like to thank our town 
administrator, Mike Sullivan, the Board of Selectmen, town 
counsel, Mark Cerel, and members of the Warrant Committee for 
their special support during 1994. 

1994 LIBRARY STATISTICS 
Circulation 131,324 New Acquisitions 3,988 

New Patron Registration 861 Total Items Owned 40,870 

Respectfully submitted, 
Jane B. Archer 
Library Director 



73 



TRUSTEES OF THE MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

SUMMARY 

Much of the past year has been occupied with planning 
for renovations to the library building. There has also 
been a turnover of three Trustee seats during the past year. 
The Trustees have been focusing on the explosion of 
electronic information services, and are trying to ensure 
that the Library is able to provide access to these 
important services as they evolve. We also are looking at 
the population trends in Medfield in an effort to plan for 
the future needs of the community. 

LIBRARY RENOVATION 

After receiving funding at Town Meeting for 
architectural planning, the Trustees advertised the project 
and eventually selected an architect. The architectural firm 
chosen was Stahl and Associates. Working closely with the 
Library Director, Jane Archer, and the Trustees, the 
architects have substantially completed the preliminary 
designs that will be presented to the State Board of Library 
Commissioners as part of our grant application. 

The Trustees appointed a Building Committee to work on 
the renovation project. Some members of the committee have 
construction/design related experience, while others bring a 
fresh, unencumbered perspective to the process. 

NEW TRUSTEES 

During the past year, three trustee seats have turned 
over. Because of an aggressive effort to involve associate 
members, the Trustees had the luxury of choosing new members 
from a pool of dedicated, well informed citizens. This 
strategy of involving associate members has served the 
Library Trustees well, and will likely continue as long as 
there are interested citizens. 

ELECTRONIC RESOURCES 

More and more resources are being provided 
electronically, and the demand for these resources is 
increasing. From CD ROM collections of newspaper and 
periodicals, to on-line databases of research data, to 
global internet access, our library patrons are demanding an 
ever increasing array of services. Thanks to our membership 
in the Minuteman Library Network, we have been able to 
provide access to many of these resources for relatively 
little expense. Looking to the future, more investment in 
technology appears likely. 

74 



POPULATION TRENDS 

With the influx of new families into Medfield, the 
Library, much like the schools, will face increased demands 
for services. One area that is currently utilized heavily, 
and will likely experience significant increases in demands 
is the children's area. The children's programs are very 
popular, and the demands for these services are expected to 
increase as the population of young children increases. 

National demographic trends indicate an increasing 
population of senior citizens, and Medfield will likely 
follow this trend as well. Library programs and resources 
already serve this segment of our town population, and will 
likely need to increase in the future. 

CONCLUSION 

The Library continues to enjoy tremendous support from 
the community. Statistics show that library usage has 
increased dramatically. In the spirit and tradition of the 
public library, the Trustees are committed to ensuring that 
the Library continues to provide quality services to 
everyone . 

Respectfully submitted, 

Willis H. Peligian, Chairman 
LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



75 



MEMORIAL DAY ADDRESS 

May 30, 1994 

Given by Philip J. Bun- 
Recipient of the Navy Cross 

"Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few" 

These are the inspirational words of Prime Minister Winston Churchill in November 1940. 
Churchill was crediting the Royal Air Forces successful defense of Britain from September 
1940 to November 1940 during the devastating attacks of the German LuffwaflEle on the 
islands of the British after the fall of France in World War II. 

Just as Britain honored their heroes in 1940, we are honoring Medfield's heroes today, 
Memorial Day - 1994. Medfield's finest hour was the sacrifices of its courageous men and 
women in the many wars that are a part of our American heritage from the Revolutionary 
war to the Vietnam War. Memorial Day must be a reaffirmation that our Medfield boys 
did not lose their lives in vain. Medfield Graves Officer, Marshall Chick informed me that 
over 620 American Flags are placed over deceased veterans who answered their country's 
call to service. 

My military experiences involved the Korean War 1950 -1954. Author James Brady 
called it the coldest war - Forgotton War. My High School classmates were Dan Hinkley, 
Lindsey Ripley, Ronnie Curry, Peter Shiels, George Hinkley, Melvin Mills, and Everett 
Dewar. When the war began, we were all drafted or enlisted into the service. 

My training took me to Paris Island, South Carolina, a southern resort where I was 
introduced to southern hospitallity. After officers training at Quantico, Virginia and 
debarkation at Camp Pendleton, we were on the troop ship to Inchon, Korea. Medfield's 
Honor Roll lists over one hundred and fifty (150) women and men who served their 
country in the Korean War. Medfield was well represented in the Korean conflict by 
heroic efforts. Alan Larkin, Joseph McCarthy, James Tubridy, John Newell and tragically, 
George Snyder to name a few. George was a southern boy who was living with his sister 
in Medfield and was drafted and made the supreme sacrifice. He was the only Medfield 
resident and soldier of the U.S. Army who was killed in battle. Many service men 
returned home with serious wounds. 

To recreate Medfield's heroes, I went to our honored sites on the parade route; Baxter 
Park, Revolutionary site, Round Top, Cemetery Pond, American Legion Plot and the 
Vietnam Memorial. One memorial grave site honoring a fallen soldier in the Civil War 
seemed to say it all - 

Allan Kingsbury 

Died April 26, 1862 

Yorktown, Virginia 

The inscriptional words of his memorial - "My country calls and I must go". 



76 



Walking the sites, my next stop took me to the American Legion plot, and my heart was 
touched by the supreme sacrifice of three young men in the Vietnam War. The three 
Marines seemed to personify Churchill's words of Medfield's "few" who contributed so 
much. 

1. Peter Kristoff. was a P. F.C. in U.S. Marine Corp. A member of Third Marine 
Division in Vietnam. He was 19 years old and died in combat August 10, 1969. 

2. Lance Corporal Stephen Hinkley. is buried near the Legion plot in the Hinkley 
plot. His memorial relates that he made the supreme sacrifice May 6, 1968. 

A member of the Third Marine Division. He was 19 years old, one day shy 
of his birthday. 

3. William Larseru U.S. Marine Corp. Billy died October 4, 1960. He heard the call 
to defend his country. He enlisted in the service but tragically died in a plane 
crash at Logan Airport before he could proudly wear the uniform of his beloved 
country. Billy was 19 years of age. 

They were the bravest of the brave these young men, and all of our young sailors, soldiers, 
marines, airforce, and women service personnel, we revere on this Memorial Day. But 
lest we forget the Gold Star Mothers who grieved and suffered so much from the loss of 
their loved ones. In Medfield, it's the Sproul's, the Bravo's, Knehr's, Rossi's, Werner's, 
Hinkley's, Kristoffs, Larson's, and many many more. 

Finally, let us all go back and reflect on Lindsey Wood's eloquent quote of Abraham 
Lincoln on November 19, 1863, at the site of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania memorials where 
thousands died for their definition of liberty and union. "We here highly resolve that these 
dead shall not have died in vain and that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of 
freedom!" 



77 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Committee to Study Memorials is pleased to submit its sixth Annual Report. It 
was with a great deal of pride that the Committee was able to dedicate the Richard C. 
Werner Square, located at the intersection of Harding and West Mill Streets and across 
from Richard's boyhood home, on May 29, 1994. Richard C. Werner gave his life while 
serving his country in World War n. The square was voted to be so named and dedicated 
as a result of the passage of Article 29 of the 1993 Annual Town meeting. The 
dedication, attended by over 150 veterans, friends, area neighbors and town residents 
began with a welcome by Committee to Study Memorials, Chairman, Richard DeSorgher. 
The National Anthem was sung by Medfield High School senior Lisa Halliday. Speakers 
included Reverend David Flanders of the Church of the Advent, Beckwith Post 110, 
American Legion Commander Ernest Roy, Selectwoman Ann Thompson, State 
Representative Lida Harkins, Honorable United States Representative Joseph Moakley 
and Richard Werner, nephew of Richard C. Werner. The square sign was unveiled by the 
siblings of Richard C. Werner. Taps were played by Daniel Arnold of Medfield High 
School and a reception followed at the PfafT Community Center. The entire cost of the 
dedication was paid through a fund raising letter. The Committee is in debt to the 
following citizens whose contributions made the dedication possible: 

Michael and Barbara Cronin (Sponsor) 

Tracy Mitchell (Sponsor) 

Vincent Palumbo (Sponsor) 

the Werner Family 

R. Edward Beard 

Maurice Bouin 

Clint and Jean Clark 

Pauline Goucher 

Earle Kerr 

William H. Mann 

Robert O. McCarthy 

Mr. and Mrs. R.T. Neary 

Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth Quickel 

Hope and Jim Sproul 

Burgess P. Standley 

Blanchard Warren 

We are also once again in debt to the Medfield Highway Department. Through the 
efforts of the Highway Department, the intersection of Harding and West Mill Streets was 
greatly improved. The old dirt island was removed and West Mill Street was redesigned 
to come directly into Harding Street. An attractive park-like square was created that now 
gives honor to the Richard C. Werner Square sign. 

The Committee was presented with a petition by John Mezzanotte Sr. to move 

78 



the World War II Honor Roll that is located inside the Memorial School where it is hidden 
away where no one can see it. The petition asked the Committee to explore the moving of 
the Honor Roll to a more visible location. The Committee held a public hearing at Town 
Hall to seek the views of the individuals whose names were on the Honor Roll as well as 
any concerned residents. Some eighty-five individuals whose names were on the Honor 
Roll were able to be contacted. The American Legion Newsletter and the Suburban Press 
also announced the public hearing. It was the view of the hearing that the Memorial 
Honor Roll should be moved to the outside wall of the Memorial School and that a more 
visible World War II Monument should be built at Baxter Park. The Committee also felt 
that plans should be developed to include plans for monuments to all America's wars, in 
addition to World War II. The Committee to Study Memorials appointed a 
sub-committee to begin the planning for a World War II Monument and to develop plans 
for Baxter Park that would include "paper plans ' for the future locations of the other war 
memorials. Appointed to the sub-committee were Jack Femandes, Commander of the 
Beckwith Post 110, American Legion; Ken Childs, former Selectman; Al Manganello, 
Vietnam Veteran; Phil Burr, former Veteran's Agent and decorated Korean War Veteran; 
John Mezzanotte, Sr., World War II Veteran whose name is on the Honor Roll; Pat 
Iafolla, World War II Veteran whose name is on the Honor Roll and John Mezzanotte Jr., 
Medfield native and non-veteran. It was the goal of the Committee to have the Memorial 
Honor Roll remounted on the outside of the Memorial School in time for a rededication 
on Memorial Day 1995 and have the new World War II Monument in Baxter Park 
dedicated on Veteran's Day 1995. The sub-committee also planned to work closely with 
the Medfield Park and Recreation Commission and M.E.M.O. 

The Committee submitted the names of World War I Veterans to the Planning 
Board for street naming consideration. Again this year, as it had been three times last 
year, the names were rejected. The Committee was very disappointed by the Planning 
Board's rejection. The names submitted were Medfield boys who went off to war when 
their country called and while the passing of time causes us all to forget those individuals, 
it was for that very reason that the Committee feels it is so important to honor those who 
died for their country. Their sacrifice for us is too great to ever forget or reject. The 
Committee was successful, however, in naming the new street off Causeway treet, "Jade 
Walk" and the two new streets off Green Street, "Warwick" and "Newport." 
Jade Walk was the historical name, dating back to the founding of the town, of the region 
traversed by Orchard and Causeway Streets, near the Upper Bridge. Newport Green and 
Warwick Green were former slaves from Medfield who fought for their new country 
during the Revolutionary War. The Green family lived in the area of the new proposed 
streets and the name Green Street is named after the Green Family. Their master had 
come to Medfield from Rhode Island before setting them free, hence the names Warwick 
and Newport. 

The Committee is currently working on naming the streets in Vine Lake Cemetery. 
The Committee working with the Cemetery Commission, hopes to present the proper 
names to Town Meeting for official action. This was a special concern Paul Curran, 
member of our Committee and Veteran's agent had. The death of Paul was a great loss to 
our Committee and to the entire Town of Medfield. 



79 



His work with our Committee, with the Veterans of the town, with the Medfield Home 
Committee, with the American Legion, and with the baseball program in Medfield cannot 
be replaced. Above all, he was a great friend who we will forever miss. 

We wish to thank the Beckwith Post 110, American Legion, the Medfield 
Highway Department, Police Department, School Department, Michael Sullivan, Town 
Hall Staff and the many residents and Town Boards who helped our committee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard P. DeSorgher 
Clifford G. Doucette 
Robert A. Kinsman 
David F. Temple 
Patricia I. Walsh 




Richard C. Werner Square 



80 



NORFOLK COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Operational Project Program integrates all proven technologies into a system 
of mosquito control that is rational, safe, effective and economically feasible. 

All mosquito eggs need water to hatch and to sustain larval growth. 

SOURCE REDUCTION WORK: 

Our primary efforts are concentrated on the drainage of shallow, standing, stagnant 
water, and the maintenance of existing flow systems which contribute to mosquito 
breeding sources. 

Drainage ditches cleaned 1,571 feet 

Brush obstructing drainage cut 70 feet 

Drainage reconstructed by wide-track backhoe 200 feet 

LARVICIDING: 

Treatment of mosquito larvae during aquatic development is the next most 
effective control effort. 

Larvicide by backpack\briquets\mistblowers 146 acres 

ADULTICIDING: 

The suppression of flying adult mosquitoes becomes necessary when they are 
numerous, annoying, or threatening to residents. 

Adulticide fogging from trucks 4,21 1 acres 

Surveys, inspections, and monitoring in support of our program include locating 
and mapping breeding areas, larval and adult collections, and field work evaluations 
leading to better drainage. 

The Project received 121 calls from residents for information and assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John J. Smith, Co-Superintendent 



81 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) has worked to increase its 
legislative capacity in 1994, and this effort has resulted in substantial revenue to cities and 
towns. For example, the Council lobbied for the Capital Outlay Bill, signed into law in 
August, which included $300 million in Chapter 90 funding to cities and towns for road 
and bridge repairs. The Capital Outlay Bill also included language which allotted $10 
million toward a state-funded revolving loan to homeowners for Title 5 repairs. 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council was instrumental in creating this concept, and is 
currently working with the Department of Environmental Protection to formulate a 
mechanism to effectively allocate these funds. The Council was instrumental in organizing 
over thirty transportation-oriented groups to lobby for the passage of the Transportation 
Bond Bill, which will allot $4.6 billion in bonds over two years for road, bridge, mass 
transit, and other transportation-related projects. The Council has also worked toward the 
passage of the Open Space Bond Bill, the River Protection Bill, and other critical 
initiatives. 

Listed below is the outline of technical assistance provided during calendar year 
1994 for the Town of Medfield. 

* Supported the acquisition of Wilson Mountain in Dedham, which was on the MDCs 
priority parcel acquisition list, (sent support letter to MDC) 

* Finalized revision of subregional bylaws and MO A. Subregion unanimously approved 
new versions. Metropolitan Area Planning Council sent new MOAs to TRIC selectmen 
for their ratification. 

* Continued as Corridor Advisory Committee (CAC) to CTPS for the Route 1 South 
Corridor Planning Study. Met with CTPS staff on a number of occasions to discuss work 
progress and to provide feedback on the various study elements. CTPS distributed a draft 
report to TRIC and the Mass. Highway Department for their comments. 

* Reviewed the Regional Transportation Plan and TIP review. 

* Representatives and staff participated in subregional retreat at Brandeis University. 

* Submitted competitive discretionary project proposal to prepare a non-point source 
pollution control bylaw. This was not funded by Metropolitan Area Planning Council. 
The Mass Bays eventually agreed to fund this project, with in-kind assistance provided by 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council staff and TRIC planners. 

* Participated in a discussion with the Greater Boston Manufacturing Partnership 
regarding their program for economic development assistance for small to mid-sized 
manufacturers. 

82 



* Heard from David Soule on the Mass Alliance for Economic Development regarding 
the organization's lead referral service for vacant and underutilized sites 

* Heard presentation from Metropolitan Area Planning Council staff on Mass. Local Net. 

* Heard presentation from Metropolitan Area Planning Council staff on Bicycle 
Transportation planning. 

* Heard presentation from Jan Smith of MCZM regarding the Coastal Non-Point Source 
Pollution Control program, and its applicability statewide 

MAPC staff reviewed open space plan 

MAPC staff assisted communities with the programming of transportation projects into 
the Transportation Improvement Program Project solicitation requests, TIP updates, and 
project status reports were provided to the community on a regular basis 

Respectfully submitted. 

Da\id C Soule, 
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 




The children at the Pfaff Center enjoy storytime 
with Jean Friswell. 



83 



PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 

To the Honorable Board of Selectman and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Park and Recreation Commission is a five member, elected board of 
volunteers. The Commission is charged with the oversight and administration of six Town 
properties. The properties are Baker's (Meeting House) Pond, Baxter Park, Hinkley Swim 
Pond, Metacomet Park, PfafT Community Center and 56 Acres property located on 
Hospital Road. 

The Commission meets on the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at the 
PfafT Center. The administration and oversight responsibilities of the Commission include, 
but are not limited to, setting policies and fees, initiation and administration of programs, 
park and field facility maintenance, building maintenance, short term planning, long term 
planning, and staffing. 

The Park and Recreation Commission continues to work towards the goal of 
providing a department that is attentive to the policy decisions of the Commission as well 
as being responsive to the community. In 1992 the Administrator's hours were 19 then 
increased to 25 in 1993 and are currently at 30 for 1994. The Administrator, Sandi Keys, 
responsibilities include, but are not limited to, carrying out the Commission's 
administrative duties, oversight of staff, development and implementation of program and 
special events, as well as day to day operations of the department. 

The activity classes are coordinated by Elsie Pocock. The program has expanded 
throughout the year offering new programs suggested by the community and increases to 
the current programs. The class coordinator's responsibilities include, but are not limited 
to, coordination of classes, class development and evaluation, and compilation of classes 
for the brochure. The activity class program is in its ninth year and continues to grow. 

The Baker's Pond site includes the pond and park adjacent to the pond. The 
dredging and repair work on the pond was completed in the Fall of 1994. The 
Commission is working to improve the park facility and the grounds. 

Baxter Park received a face lift in the fall of 1994. Lueders Landscaping in 
conjunction with members of MEMO pruned the park trees and landscaped the area. 
They plan to make further improvements to the park. The Memorial Committee is also 
looking at placing a new memorial at the park. 

Hinkley Swim Pond, located on Green Street, continues to provide swimming 
lessons, swim team and recreational swim in the summer. The pond was administered by 
Darlene Koetsch in 1994. The Commission continues to look at the pond, the programs 
offered and how it meets the needs of the community. 

Metacomet Park, located on Pleasant Street, consists of the Little League field, 
soccer field, the playground and the tennis courts. The tennis courts received new lights 



84 



during the summer. Courts were busy throughout the spring and summer. The tennis 
program for children ran extremely well over the summer. The soccer field has been 
overused during 1994 and will go through a vigorous field maintenance schedule to bring 
it back to life. The Commission has worked with both Little League and Medfield Soccer 
to fund and maintain these fields. 

The Pfaff Community Center, located on the corner of North and Dale Streets, 
continues to be updated. The whole interior of the building was repainted and work done 
to the ceilings as well. New doors were installed in January. The Pfaff Center continues 
to be the main meeting place for local groups as well as the location for all Park and 
Recreation programs. The Commission continues to work on improving the building and 
will be considering usage of the basement as a teen center in addition to replacing the 
existing windows and carpeting in the building. 

56 Acres site is currently home to two softball fields. The Commission continues 
to work to improve the facility and works closely with groups using the fields. The 
Medfield Youth Sports Boosters have been meeting with the Commission and plans are 
underway for new little league fields to be built at the site. 

Creative Camp is the Summer program that offers a variety of fun, educational, 
and developmental activities for young children. The 1994 season was a great success, 
thanks to Jodie Bowers and Jean Kingsbury, who plan to return in 1995. The camp will 
be expanding in 1995 to offer 6 weeks of camp to 55 campers per day. The camp will be 
housed at Dale Street School. 

The Commission was pleased to welcome Heidi Oppel and Jack Parenteau in 
1994. With the resignation of Bob Miller in Dec. 1994, one seat remains vacant. 

The Commissions goal of having a full time administrator is close to becoming 
reality with the increase in programs and activities. Since last years town meeting, our 
administrator is working 30 hours per week. Our continued goal in 1995 is to have a 
fully staffed department with additional support staff. It is the Commission's belief that 
Park and Recreation is a vital resource for Medfield. In closing, we would like to thank 
all the volunteers and residents for their efforts in helping the Commission and for the 
continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Nina French, Chairman 
Heidi Oppel, Secretary 
Geralyn Warren, Treasurer 
Jack Parenteau, Commissioner 



85 



PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 1994 the Planning Board approved three definitive subdivision plans. Wild 
Holly Farm is an 8 lot subdivision on 19.2 acres of land off High Street. Fox Hunt 
Estates is a 12 lot subdivision on 6.27 acres of land off Green Street. Beechwood Estates 
is a 14 lot subdivision on 20 acres of land off Causeway Street. These subdivisions will 
add three new streets with a total of 3,215 feet and 34 new homes. 

A total of seventy six lots were released for building from the Wild Holly Farm 
subdivision and five previously approved subdivisions; Hawthorne Village, Overfield 
Estates, Dela Park Acres, Kettle Pond Estates, and Bridlemere subdivisions. 

The Board endorsed nine "approval-not-required" plans, creating two new lots 
along existing streets. The Board denied one such endorsement. 

No site plans were submitted to the Board in 1994. 

TOWN MEETING ACTIONS 

The Board placed five (5) articles on the Town Meeting Warrant. Three of the 
articles were passed at Town Meeting and approved by the Attorney General: 

— the minimum lot size must be 100% Non Wetlands/Flood Plain and not have a slope 

greater than 20%. 
— food markets and restaurants must obtain a Special Permit from the Zoning Board of 

Appeals; drive-throughs or takeout windows are not allowed. 
— boulders must be buried such that their tops are four feet below the approved grade. 



SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 

During 1994 the Sign Advisory Board continued to review applications for sign 
permits, to advise and assist sign applicants, and to recommend modifications of the Sign 
Bylaw. 

OTHER BUSINESS 

The Board continues to review the Subdivision Rules and Regulations, with an 
eye toward improving development requirements in the Town. 

Board members served on the Medfield State Hospital Reuse Committee and the 
Capital Budget Committee. 

The Board continued to use the engineering services of Whitman and Howard for 
subdivision review and street construction inspections. 

86 



The Planning Board acknowledges with thanks the cooperation and assistance of 
the Town Boards and Departments with special thanks to Town Counsel, Mark G Cerel, 
Superintendent of Public Works, Kenneth P. Feeney, and Tree Warden, Edward Hinkley. 

Planning Board meetings are held weekly on Mondays at 8:00 P.M. at the Town 
House and are open to the public. Appointments with the Board must be made by the 
Thursday noon prior to the meeting. Request for information or appointments should be 
directed to the Planning Board Administrator, Norma Cronin, at the Town House. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John K. Gagliani, Chairman 
Paul B Rhuda, Vice-Chairman 
David E. Sharif, Secretary 
David A. Franchi. Member 
Stephen J. Browne, Member 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my first report as Veterans' Agent for the Town of Medfield. 

Due to the passing of Paul Curran, the Board of Selectmen appointed me as 
Director, Agent and Burial Agent on August 23, 1994. I will strive to continue to serve 
our veterans and their families in the same caring way that Paul did in this capacity for the 
past twenty-two years. 

Veterans' services include helping the veteran with benefits when needed, 
hospitalization, pension assistance, information on education, social security and burial 
allowances. This assistance includes fuel, food, clothing, housing and medical expenses 
for Veterans and their families. Please feel free to contact me at town hall, if you need any 
assistance or have any questions. 

Services and assistance rendered Medfield Veterans and their dependents are 
authorized by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The Commonwealth reimburses the 
Town seventy-five percent of the benefits extended. 

I wish to thank Town officials and especially Bernadette Curran for their assistance 
and helpfulness in this year of transition. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Clifford G. Doucette 
VETERANS' AGENT 



87 



RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Recycling Committee is appointed by the Board of Selectmen to 
implement recycling in Medfield. 

COST AVOIDANCE 

The following is a chart of the number of tons of commodities that were recycled 
in 1994. Of particular note is the price paid to Medfield for old newspaper this past year. 
It has increased from $5.00 per ton (standard price in 1993) to over $45 per ton for some 
deliveries. This is due to an increase in demand for old newspaper as a result of the 
opening of several new mills in the Northeast. The markets for the other commodities that 
we recycle have also been strong this year as a result of the general rise in the economy 
and are expected to remain strong in 1995. 

The total solid waste tonnage that went to the Wheelabrator incinerator in 
Millbury was 5,870 tons. The Town of Medfield paid $359,254 for this service. That 
tonnage was reduced by 1,126.254 tons, or about one fifth, by recycling. This saved the 
town approximately $74,178 in transportation to and tipping fees at the incinerator. 
Additional tonnage reduction from composting and the swap area cannot be calculated, 
but accounts for a further reduction in incineration costs. 



COMMODITY 


TONNAGE 


%CHANGE 
FROM '93 


REVENUE 
(COST) 
GENERATED 


SAVINGS* 

i 


OLD NEWSPAPER 


709.16 


-0.06% 


$7,788 


$60,975 


GLASS 


141.34 


+ 35% 


$1,964 


$12,565 


WHITE METAL 


235.53 


- 8% 


$3,625** 


-0- 


METAL CANS 


19.70 


- 10% 


-0- 


$ 1,478 


PLASTICS 


19.72 


+ 34% 


($ 639) 


($ 840) 


DEPOSIT*** 


0.804 


+ 55% 


$2,252 


-0- 


TOTAL TONS 


1,126,254 








TOTAL APPROXIMATE SAVINGS IN 1994 




$74,178.00 



* Savings calculated by multiplying tonnage by $75. (cost per ton if hauled to the 

incinerator) then adding the revenue and subtracting transportation costs. 

** White metal is not counted in the cost savings as it never went to the Millbury 

incinerator. 

***The proceeds from the collection of deposit cans and plastic bottles goes one third 

each to the restoration of the Grist Mill, the Gazebo and Household Hazardous Waste 

collection. 

NEW PROGRAMS 



1. Swap Area . The Re-collections area was set up in May directly across from 
the transfer station windows. Residents dropped off usable items that they no longer 

88 



wanted and those who were interested in them picked them up. Many residents found 
"treasures" in their neighbors' "trash". The area closed in December for the winter and 
will reopen again in May. 

2. Phone Books . In March a special collection bin was set up to collect old 
phonebooks. A three yard container of phonebooks was collected. 

3. Newsletter . The Committee's newsletter, "Transformation", is published 
several times a year to inform residents about recycling in Medfield. It is distributed at the 
transfer station and left for pick-up at Town Hall and the Library. The total cost of this 
publication for 1994 was $359.00. 

THIS YEAR . 

1. Medfield Day Booth . The raffle prizes at this year's booth were two 
composting bins and several insulated lunch bags. 

2. Compost Bins . The Town purchased 35 Earth Machine Composting bins 
through a Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection contract and sold them 
to residents at cost ($32.00 per bin). 

3. Volunteers . A training session was held in September and shown on the town's 
Cable 8 station. The committee is always in need of new volunteers to help at the 
recycling drop off area and for special events. Committee meeting notes are sent to all 
volunteers to keep them informed. This year several local high school students served at 
the recycling area to fulfill community service requirements. 

4. Education . Displays on general recycling and composting were up at the Town 
Library. A group of 9th graders made a sign for the transfer station depicting which 
plastics can and cannot be recycled. A presentation on recycling was made at the Middle 
School in March. Additionally, press releases were sent out for special events (e.g. 
opening of the swap area) and reminders (e.g. looking for volunteers). 

5. Button Cell Batteries . Approximately five pounds of batteries were collected 
and sent to Wheelabrator for recycling. Button cell batteries are collected at Lord's, CVS, 
Tilden Village and Town Hall. 

6. Paint Swap . The paint swap was held on June 4, 1994 and around 85 cans of 
paint were swapped or donated to the High School drama club, the Odyssey House and to 
Stony Brook. The paint that was not picked up was returned to those who had dropped it 
off. 

7. Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection Grant Application . 
The Department of Public Works, working with the Recycling Committee, has applied for 
a 40 yard closed roll-off container for cardboard collection, a 40 yard open roll-off 
container for plastics collection, compost bins and a public education campaign. 

PLANS FOR FUTURE . 



89 



1. Compost Bins . This Spring the committee will take orders for compost bins 
that will be provided by the State at a reduced cost of $16.00 plus tax. 

2. Truck Conversion . The town is considering converting an old town truck so 
that the town can haul all of the recyclables to market instead of paying for trucking some 
commodities. 

3. Telephone books will again be collected in March at the time that the new 
books are distributed. Through arrangements with the telephone company, a recycling 
guide with helpful information about recycling in Medfield will be printed in the 1995-6 
telephone books. 

4. New Commodities . In 1995 the Massachusetts Department of Environmental 
Protection will implement new waste bans prohibiting the incineration or landfilling of 
paper and plastics. Therefore, the committee will be working to implement cardboard and 
more plastics recycling in 1995. Additionally, the Committee will continue to investigate 
recycling aluminum, books and nickel-cadmium rechargeable batteries. 

The Medfield Recycling Committee would like to thank all of the residents for 
their participation in and their support of recycling in Medfield. We are pleased to report 
that recycling is growing and improving in Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Andrea Costello 

Kenneth P. Feeney, Town Representative 

Sandy Frigon 

Cynthia Greene, Chairperson 

Tim Holt 

Donna Masterson 

Jim O'Shaughnessy 

Erin Pastuszenski 

Annette Wells 



90 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is my Annual Report for the fiscal year of 1994. 

The following scales, weights, liquid measuring meters and measures were sealed. 



Balances and Scales 


32 


Weights 


78 


Liquid Measuring Meters 


66 


Linear Measures 


3 



A total of 153 inspections were made and/or sealed for 1994. Revenue for the 
Department was $2,966.40. 

Respectfully submitted 

Patricia A. Rioux, 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS and MEASURES 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

We are pleased to advise that the expansion of the cemetery towards Bridge Street 
is continuing and we expect some major improvements in 1995. 

In 1994, we continued to replace the old and diseased trees, as well as trees 
damaged during the storms, with new trees. We were also able to resurface four 
roadways in August of 1994. 

There were 47 burials, 22 cremations and 26 lots sold in 1994 

Respectfully submitted, 

Eric W. O'Brien, Chairman 
David McCue 
Walter Reynolds 



91 



TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL 
TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In July 1994 the School Committee reorganized and elected the following officers: 
Janice Young (Walpole) Chairperson, Victor Knustgraichen (Wrentham) Vice Chairman, 
and Louis Hoegler (Walpole) Secretary. 

The School Committee conducts its regularly scheduled meetings on the third 
Wednesday of each month at 7:30 P.M. in the Committee Meeting Room at the school. 
Other sub-committee meetings are scheduled as needed. 

GRADUATION: 

On June 5, 1994, 139 students were graduated in an impressive afternoon 
ceremony. Janice Young, Chairperson of the Tri-County School Committee, delivered the 
welcoming address to more than one thousand guests. Music was provided by the Millis 
High School Band. 

Mary M. Fleming, Director of Pupil Personnel Services, presented scholarships 
and awards totaling more than $100,000 to deserving seniors. 

PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES : 

In September 1994, Tri-County welcomed approximately 754 students to the new 
school year. Of that number 20 were Medfield residents. Other towns and residents 
included: Franklin 155, Medway 42, Millis 30, Norfolk 35, North Attleboro 192, 
Plainville 40, Seekonk 69, Sherborn 3, Walpole 52, and Wrentham 63. Also 53 students 
were accepted from Out of District areas. 

Because of the Co-operative Employment Program at Tri-County, twenty-seven 
students started early employment in industry. At graduation 50% of the students were 
working in their technical areas. Approximately 34% of the class planned to attend 2 or 4 
year postgraduate schools. 11% of the class planned to enter the military. Among the 
colleges, graduates have enrolled in: Bryant College, University of Massachusetts at 
Dartmouth & Lowell, Massachusetts College of Art, Wentworth Institute, Johnson & 
Wales University, Northeastern University, Bridgewater State, Dean College, Arizona 
State, and Mass Bay Community College. 

In October, Tri-County administered the PSAT's for the College Board. 
Additional testing and career inventories were administered for all Grade 9 students by the 
Guidance Department. Tri-County counselors, parents, and students joined other area 
towns for a Higher Education Night in Medway. 

The Pupil Personnel Department continued its evening programs for 94-95. The 
Guidance Department continued its Peer Helpers program to assist with school adjustment 
and to introduce the Tri-County to junior high students in the community. The 
department continued its programs on preparing for college with the assistance of Dean 

92 



College Financial Aid Administrators and Admissions Counselors. Tri-County hosted two 
Career Days for Grade 8 students and held evening Open Houses for parents. 

Tri-County has established itself as a leader in the Tech Prep System. This 
concept has been referred to by National Business and Educational Leaders as one of the 
most exciting initiatives in education. The primary function of the Tech Prep program is 
the combined secondary/post secondary program that is being offered to Tri-County 
students with Massachusetts Bay Community College, Wentworth Institute of 
Technology, Northeastern University, Dean College, Middlesex Community College and 
Aquinas College. Students involved in the Tech Prep program must complete an 
established level of academics and technical competencies. Students upon completion of 
their high school work will be awarded credits according to the articulated agreement. In 
1994 students who received college credit for completion of Tech areas are now attending 
Wentworth Institute, University of Massachusetts as Lowell and Arizona State University. 

ACADEMICS: 

A continuing recognition that our graduates need to fully develop their academic 
abilities has led us to review our academic offerings. Beginning in 1995 all grade 9 pupils 
will begin a four year sequence of science courses including biology, chemistry, principles 
of technology and one science elective (microbiology, physics, astronomy, or Principles of 
Technology II). 

State-wide curriculum frameworks are soon to be issued and Tri-County is 
prepared to respond to these guidelines for core academic subjects. All students at 
Tri-County continue to take a full academic load with no study periods. Every student has 
a class every period every day. 

Mr. Ed Hichborn, a long time teacher at Tri-County, was appointed to the position 
of Academic Coordinator this year. In addition to his regular teaching duties, Mr. 
Hichborn will now assist in the development of curriculum guides for academic areas, 
develop interdisciplinary teaching models, and develop a technology plan for the school. 

It is the goal of the Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School to 
keep our programs current and to fully meet the needs of our pupils and of the workplace. 

VOCATIONAL/TECHNICAL PROGRAMS: 

The Vocational programs have made every effort to simulate real work experience 
by providing service to district town agencies, civil organizations, and residents. The 
Auto Repair, Auto Body and Metal Trade departments are fully scheduled for customer 
work at all times. The work is accepted from district residents if such work coincides with 
the instructional curriculum. The Auto Repair program has received A.S.E. Master 
Certification from the National Automotive Technician Education Foundation. 

The Child Care program provides a creative agenda that foster the wholesome 
development of the pre-schoolers in a variety of early childhood settings. High School 
students work with these youngsters learning first hand the various theories and practices 
of child development. 



93 



Cosmetology is a program that provides skill in a variety of beauty services, such 
as hair, scalp, skin and nails. The program prepares the student for the State License in 
hairdressing. The clinic is open to the public during the school year. 

The Culinary Arts shop continues to attract many local patrons to their student run 
restaurant (Gerry's Place) and bake shop. Many senior citizen groups from the community 
visit Tri-County to sample the delicious meals that are prepared by the high school 
students. 

Desktop Publishing is part of the Commercial Art and Graphic Arts curriculum. 
Students learn Computer Layout, Desktop and Graphics. 

Electronics Technology prepares the student for entry level positions in the 
Electronics, Computer and Consumer product service industries. 

Marketing/Office Technology education includes Banking, Retailing and 
Secretarial skills to students who have selected this vocational program. Students master 
skills in Computerized Accounting, Data Base Management, Word Processing and Lotus 
1-2-3. Students taking this program also receive hands on training by working at the 
Dean Cooperative Bank located at Tri-County . The Bank is open to the public during the 
school year for all banking services. 

The Medical Careers program continues to grow as it enters its third full year. We 
are currently affiliated with three area Nursing Homes (Medfield, Franklin, and Wrentham) 
where students can apply skills on patient care and recreational activities. 

The Plumbing and Electrical programs allow students to acquire technical skills 
while accruing state mandated hours in both practical and theory applications. Once 
completed, these students will be prepared to take the state journeyman examination in 
their respective trade areas. 

The Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning program provides students with 
proper instruction relative to the recovery and recycling of refrigerants. EPA government 
regulations require that HVAC standards remain at the cutting edge of technology. 

The Carpentry program allows students to become familiar with both rough and 
finish construction. As students complete this program, they are well on their way to 
securing construction supervisor licenses. 

Our construction program has been very busy this year with the construction of 
"Cougar House", the school athletic field house and with the BICO Collaborative project 
at King Philip High School in Wrentham. 

CONTINUING EDUCATION: 

The Continuing Education Programs offers an Adult Cosmetology program during 
the day. This is a separate program that provides 1000 hrs. of instruction. The program 
runs from September to May and follows the high school calendar. Registration for this 
program takes place at the end of May each year. The Evening School Division has 
enrolled approximately 600 students for the 1994-95 school year. New programs include 

94 



Computer Aided Machining, Low Fat Cooking, Introduction to Computers and Desktop 
Publishing. Registration for the Evening Division takes place in September for the Fall 
Semester and in January for the Winter Sessions. 

ATHLETICS: 

The Tri-County Athletic Programs continued to show strides during the 1993-94 
year. Participation of first time players at the Freshman/Sophomore classes shows 
promise for the upcoming years. The teams all finished in the middle to upper half of their 
divisions in the Mayflower League. 

The Soccer Team had enough athletes to sponsor a JV Soccer Schedule on a 
limited basis. The Cross Country Team had a fine season losing 4 meets by one point. 
Despite losing 12 seniors from the previous year, the Girls Volleyball Team finished 7 & 
10 in the league. The Football Team finished one game off 1st place in their division, 
while the Cheerleaders were 10-0. 

The winter season saw the Boys and Girls Basketball Teams finish strong in their 
division. The boys team had such a large turnout of players that a Freshman Team was 
added. The Wrestling Team hosted the State Sectional Wrestling Tournament. Several 
wrestlers finished well enough to compete in the State Tournament. All teams were 
supported by the Cheerleaders. 

Tri-County can be proud of the Spring Teams of Softball, Baseball, Track and 
Field. A young team of Cougars give promise to the future of Tri-County. 

A new Fitness Center was opened to the students, family and staff. New Cardio 
Vascular Equipment was added along with after school aerobics. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES: 

This year Tri-County will be once again engaged in both the Hugh O'Brien Youth 
Foundation Leadership Seminar and the World Affairs Seminar for High School Students 
at University of Wisconsin- Whitewater. As in years past, we will also be participating in 
the Cultural Exchange Program. 

The Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA) is of continued interest to 
students with great success at the local, state and national competitions. This year at the 
national level a bronze medal was won by Electronics' student Ed Neipris. In the area of 
fund-raising, VICA once again will be sponsoring numerous events, including a medieval 
dinner, Breakfast with Santa and Breakfast with the Easter Bunny. 



The Distributive Education Clubs of America will be attending the North Atlantic 
Regional Conference. At this conference students will have an opportunity to meet other 
students from the Northeast and participate in various seminars and workshops. 

A new pilot program this year, entitled "Student of the Month", was implemented 
so that those students achieving significant academic success will be properly recognized. 
These awards were given monthly. 

95 



SUMMARY : 

As we move into 1995 and continue to provide for the educational needs of our 
students, we wish to thank the District residents for their support and cooperation. We 
intend to maintain in the future the high educational standard that has earned Tri-County 
that support in the past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Janice Young, Chairperson 
Karl D. Lord, Medfield 



TREE AND INSECT PEST CONTROL DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report is for the calendar year ending December 3 1, 1994. 

This year the tent caterpillar and the fall web worm were active in the apple and 
wild cherry trees. Many people confuse the above with the gypsy moth, but these insects 
do not cause damage like the gypsy moth. In fact the gypsy moths were on the decline 
this year. 

We had several tree hearings this year for tree removal, due to disease and 
damage,and which could also be dangerous to public ways. Boston Edison cleared lines 
throughout the town to help prevent power outages. 

Twenty-five tree stumps were removed this past year with our stump grinder, 
which is shared with nine (9) other towns. 

This years contract services were provided by Professional Tree from Ashland. 

Residents are reminded that if they DO NOT wish spraying to be done on their 
property, prior notice must be given to the Town Clerk by registered mail no later than 
March 1. This notice must be given each year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward M. Hinkley 

TREE WARDEN 

DIRECTOR OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 



96 



WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Board of Water & Sewerage has been confronted with major challenges of 
procuring adequate quality water supplies and establishing a policy for sewerage pump 
stations. During the year the membership of the Board has changed. Leland Beverage and 
John McKeever resigned as full members with Lee staying on as an Associate Member. 
Neal MacKenzie moved up from associate member to full member and Gary Lehmann was 
appointed as a full member. Evelyn Clarke remains our secretary. 

Much effort has been placed on trying to bring Well #6 into being. Our efforts 
have been thwarted by difficulties with obtaining approvals to secure an easement or 
ownership of the necessary land from the state agencies DEM (Department of 
Environmental Management) and DCPO (Division of Capital Planning and Operations). 
These difficulties continue despite the permits and approvals we obtained from 
Department of Environmental Protection. An engineering firm, SEA Associates, has 
been engaged to design and manage the total Well #6 project. As of this writing, it is not 
possible to establish a firm schedule for the completion of the well although it is hoped 
that it will occur in the summer of 1996. We continue to feel that this well is worth all the 
aggravation since its capacity is sufficient to supply the daily domestic needs of the current 
population. 

This past summer once again saw a voluntary odd/even water ban. The voluntary 
ban was successful and the town residents deserve congratulations for their participation. 

During this past year, we increased the flushing of water mains to twice a year. 
Flushing allows accumulated deposits of minerals such as iron & manganese to be 
removed from the mains. We would like once again to ask for the residents' indulgence in 
putting up with the temporary inconvenience of colored water during flushing. Iron and 
manganese are commonly found in Massachusetts ground water and while a nuisance to 
deal with, it is not a public health concern for human ingestion. 

Our water consultants, Amory Engineers were engaged to develop a water master 
plan for the town. It is expected that this will be completed by mid 1995. The plan will 
address the following categories; data collection and service; supply and treatment; 
distribution system; construction program; maintenance and operation; financial. 

It is expected that the plan will establish a timetable for resolving the future of well 
#5 and the hospital well field. Well #5 which is near wells 3 and 4 was never completed 
because of color and high iron content. The town does have a withdrawal permit and will 
ultimately need its capacity. An expensive treatment plant will be required for well #5 
and presumably will also have the capability of treating wells #3 and #4. This plant would 
reduce the iron and managenese problems but would add chlorination. 



97 



The issue of water towers will also be addressed. Currently the town utilizes two towers 
(Mt. Nebo and the State Hospital). The future of the State Hospital tower is uncertain 
and the preferred location of a new tower is not known. 

A high pressure water district was established in the north end of town off Pine Street. 
Water pressure in the district is increased over the town system by means of a pump 
station feeding a hydropneumatic tank (which is a substitute for a water tower). The 
pump station has the design capability of servicing 360 households. The operation and 
maintenance costs will be borne by the users. 

Water rates per 1000 gallons for semi-annual billing were adjusted to reflect the 
state requirement for conservation purposes as follows: 





Previous 


Current 


1st 30,000 gallons 


$1.50 


$1.44 


36-70,000 gallons 


2.50 


2.40 


over 71,000 gallons 


2.70 


3.30 



Entering the year the town had two sewerage pumping stations, each 
independently owned and operated by associations. After some years of waffling, the 
State DEP has left the ownership of pumping stations as an open issue. During the year 
three more pump stations have come into being and at this writing it is anticipated that one 
will remain owned and operated by an association and the remaining two will be 
transferred to town ownership. 

The Water/Sewer Board has promulgated a regulation that governs the design, 
construction operation and financial responsibility of the stations. The main feature of 
these regulations is that the financial responsibility of operating and maintaining the station 
will be borne by the users of the station. The cost of sewerage for all customers is 
considered to be high and it is felt that costs should not be increased by subsidizing the 
cost of operating and maintaining pump stations. Sewerage billing is based on 75% of the 
water used times a rate of $3.70 per thousand gallons. Septage disposal fees are $1 10 per 
1000 gallons. 

Sludge from the wastewater treatment plant continues to be disposed of by 
incineration at a Rhode Island facility. As the environmental movement is successful in 
shutting down incinerators, we are becoming more apprehensive about future sludge 
disposal. The current cost for sludge disposal is approximately $76,000 per year. 

It is to be noted that the wastewater treatment plant is in excess of 20 years old. 
Replacement of equipment and the roof are becoming items to deal with in the near future. 
The plant has adequate capacity to handle Medfield's population growth for the 
foreseeable future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Peyton March, Chairman 

Neil MacKenzie 

Gary A. Lehmann 

Ashton Shoop, Associate Member 



MEDFIELD YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

A group of students from the Youth Advisory Commission went to "Christmas in 
the City" on December 1 1, 1994, which is a program for kids from Boston Shelters. The 
Youth Advisory Commission supervised games, face painting, and other activities. Santa 
gave presents to the Shelter children. 

The Youth Advisory Commission students are currently looking into other 
volunteer work, such as, weekend night activities at the Pfaff Center for high school and 
middle school students. They are also looking at the possibility of trips for high school 
students to a farm, similar to"Outward Bound," hiking, car washes, etc. 

Any fund raising money we receive from our activities will go for a scholarship to 
Youth Advisory Commission students. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary V. Gillis, Adult Advisor 

1994-95 STUDENT EXECUTIVE BOARD 
Matthew DeSorgher - Chairman - Grade 10 
Mark Carrigan - Vice Chairman - Grade 10 
Jennifer LaFrance - Secretary - Grade 12 
Trade Slack - Treasurer - Grade 12 



YOUTH REPRESENTATIVES 
Grade 9 

Nicole Anderson 
Emily Harrison 
Megan Kelly 
David LaFrance 
Erin McNeil 
Thomas Roache 



Grade 10 
Peter Dunn 
Jacquelyn Frazier 
Andrew Kepple 
Jill Steinkeler 
Kelly Thomson 
Noah Weinstein 



Grade 1 1 
Daniel Arnold 
Thomas Guilmette 
Sheila McCabe 
Elizabeth McKeever 
LaurenYoung 



ADULT ADVISORS 



Grade 12 
Allison Foley 
Katherine Kearney 
Anna Mari Spognardi 



Mary V. Gillis 
Ray M. Burton, Jr. 
Elizabeth Newton 
Kimberly O'Connor 
Regina O'Connor 
Sharon Semeraro 



Youth Advisory Commission Advisor 

Police Department 

Outreach Worker 

Youth Advisory Commission Member 

St. Edwards Youth Ministry 

School Committee 



99 




100 



PUBLIC SCHOOL REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1994 



101 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



To the Citizens of Medfield: 

The Medfield School Committee began the year preparing 
to meet the educational needs of a rapidly expanding school 
system. At a time when the full implications of the 
Educational Reform Act of 1993 were just beginning to unfold, 
Medfield was faced with the need to provide increased 
services to an expanding school population with insufficient 
state and local funding. This resulted in the need for a 
Proposition 2 1/2 override in an effort to adequately fund 
the school budget. This was defeated by the voters at the 
polls in March. Attempts to increase local funding at Town 
Meeting also were unsuccessful. This under funding resulted 
in substantial increases in class size, a delay in the 
renovations of the Memorial School and loss of key programs 
in reading and language arts at the Middle School. 

During the summer months the Committee listened to 
proposals to change the way that rank in class was determined 
at the High School. Study groups were formed to research the 
topic and a final decision will be made some time during the 
upcoming year. 

The Medfield Schools continued to successfully integrate 
technology into the daily lives of our students. In July, 
our first Director of Technology, Marie Crompton resigned to 
take a position elsewhere. Her work in placing Medfield on 
the "Technology Highway" was invaluable and much appreciated. 
Our new Director, Susan Cervassi, has taken over and is now 
involved in preparing to further implement technology into 
the High School addition as well as systemwide. When 
completed, Medfield students will have at their disposal the 
knowledge and tools to use technology in their daily lives 
and be well prepared for the future. 

The year 1994 also brought special recognition to the 
Medfield Public Schools for its business-school partnership 
with Comark Corporation. This project involved twelve Middle 
School students building six multimedia computers using parts 
purchased by the schools and work space and equipment donated 
by Comark Corporation of Medfield. Technology assistant 
Wayne Haseltine supervised the project which received 
honorable mention by USA TODAY for innovative school-business 
ventures. These computers are now in daily use at the Middle 
School Library and Media Center where they were initially 
demonstrated to state and local officials by the students who 
built them. 

The School Committee was also pleased to support the j 
first foreign exchange student programs at Medfield High | 
School. In April, Medfield hosted eighteen high school 
students from Meudon, France, a suburb of Paris. In 
September we hosted nine students from Madrid, Spain. The 



102 



School Committee wishes to express its grateful appreciation 
to the Medfield host parents as well as the Foreign Language 
Department and Administration at Medfield High School for 
this innovative and exciting program. This winter and 
spring, Medfield High school students will participate in 
return exchanges to France and Spain respectively. 

The School Committee has also been heavily involved in 
the search for a new Superintendent of Schools. After ten 
years of dedicated service, Mr. Reis will be retiring in 
September and the search for his successor is underway. 
Searches are also underway to fill the position of Principal 
at the Memorial School, which will open to full capacity in 
September of 1995 and Principal at the Dale Street School 
when Frank Hoffman retires at the end of the school year. 

The Committee continues to work diligently to deal with 
the issues of an expanding student body and the need to 
provide adequate funding for their education. We are aware 
that Medfield is a rapidly growing community with many needs 
and a limited tax base. Assistant Superintendent Robert 
Berardi had been invaluable in working with the School 
Committee streamlining and updating the budget process and 
developing a new format for understanding the complexities of 
this important area. 

The Medfield Schools successfully instituted the Site 
Councils at each school under the guidelines of the 
Educational Reform Act. These councils composed of parents, 
teachers, community representatives and, in the case of the 
High School, a student representative, are charged with 
working with the school principal in developing their 
respective school budgets and implementing an annual plan for 
the school. Several training sessions were successfully held 
for the new council members and School Committee members. 

In the coming year, the single most important issue 
facing Medfield' s schools will be funding for an expanding 
student population. The citizens of Medfield must be 
reminded that excellence does not come without a price and 
the need for annual overrides to adequately fund the schools 
will likely be a reality for some time to come. Medfield is 
no longer a small village and nostalgia for the past cannot 
be allowed to erode what our schools have achieved, nor must 
it limit the striving for new levels of academic excellence. 
We will also be challenged to provide for the education of 
those students with special needs and in continuing our 
modest efforts with the Educational Collaborative to provide 
advanced educational opportunities for gifted students. 

I also believe that with the new changes in 
administrators, the expanding student population and 
changes mandated by the Education Reform Act of 1993, that 
there should once again take place a community wide 
Educational Retreat. This will enable us to review our 
progress of the last three years and plan our strategy for 
the future as well. Hopefully this will occur in the fall of 
1995. 



103 



At this time I would be remiss if I did not take the 
opportunity on behalf of the Medfield School Committee and 
the Medfield community, to extend our appreciation to the 
Superintendent of Schools, Thomas Reis, who has worked 
diligently for ten years to create the high performing model 
of educational excellence for which Medfield is known today. 
We wish him well in his retirement. 

I would also like to take this opportunity to publicly 
extend the thanks of the School Committee to all of the 
dedicated members of the Medfield Teachers Association who 
have contributed so much over the years to our schools, and 
also to the Administrators who have risen to the challenges 
of site based management with innovative and creative 
programs and many long hours of dedicated work that are never 
fully appreciated by the public at large. Our appreciation 
also to the non-teaching employees of the schools, the 
secretaries, custodians and food service workers who 
facilitate the work of others. Our appreciation also to the 
many, many volunteers who daily make the Medfield Schools a 
better place to learn, and to the Medfield Community School 
Associations and Medfield Coalition for Public Education for 
their efforts on behalf of our students and staff. 

Finally, I must acknowledge the dedicated hard work and 
long hours of commitment of my colleagues on the School 
Committee, Sharon Semararo, Clarence Purvis, Mark Wilson and 
Fayre Stephenson, without whose support and continued 
confidence I would not have been able to serve as your 
chairman. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Tosches M.D. 

Chairman 

Medfield School Committee 



104 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



Enrollment Figures 



1993-94 



These enrollment figures are as of October 1, 1993 

Memorial School 

Kindergarten: 193 

Ralph Wheelock School 
Grade 1: 229 
Grade 2: 195 
Grade 3: 176 
Substantially Separate Class: 6 

Dale Street School 
Grade 4: 185 
Grade 5: 166 

Thomas A. Blake Middle School 
Grade 6: 169 
Grade 7: 135 
Grade 8: 130 
Substantially Separate Class: 9 

Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 
Grade 9: 135 
Grade 10: 136 
Grade 11: 111 
Grade 12: 107 



TOTAL: 2 082 



105 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS j | e s 

! ch 

To the Citizens of Medfield: l N 

During this past year we have worked at developing real 
solutions to the problems facing our school system. We ^ 
continued on course with the Education Reform Act with the w 
main focus on the education of the individual student. c! 

11 

We have attempted to involve the entire staff, parents v 
and the community in this effort and together we willl* 
continue to try and meet the educational needs of all t 
students. e 

The Education Reform Act has sharply reduced the : 
authority of local school committees, strengthened the ' 
centralized power of the Department of Education and mandated i I 
a minimum dollar requirement for each city and town in ! 
funding its local education budget. 

Specifically, the Education Reform Act attempts to 
address four essential components: (1) new programs and 
standards to ensure high achievement for all students; (2) a 
fair and equitable system of school finance (and the promise 
of additional funding) ; (3) a governance structure that 
encourages innovation and accountability at all levels; (4) 
standards and processes to enhance the quality of 
professionalism and accountability of all educational 
personnel. 

The Town of Medfield has initialed a bold facilities 
plan that will provide the framework and support for what we 
hope will be a world class education. In 1994, construction 
and renovation began at the high school. When completed in 
September 1995, this 900 pupil high school will be 
accessible to the community and will have modern equipment 
and facilities including a new science wing and a new 
instructional media center with state-of-the-art technology. 

Medfield continued its vision of maximizing the use of 
technology in the learning process. Implementation of the 
vision was greatly enhanced with a $700,000 technology budget 
as part of the high school project. In addition to this, we 
continue to upgrade all other schools with 

state-of-the-art technology. All of this is testimony to the 
seriousness of purpose. 

An emphasis on the use of technology for communication 
and education is world-wide. Medfield has become part of 
this movement. In addition to using technology in the 
classroom, Medfield is developing a management system 
for curriculum, learning outcomes and the assessment of 
learning outcomes. All are seeking ways to access informa- 
tion, to enrich learning, to expand thinking and to empower 
each individual with knowledge. 



106 



The need to establish an instructional model that 
I delivers services to students and their families is essential 
i as we prepare children for the 21st century. In addition to 
I changing the way ve deliver services and instruction, we must 
place more emphasis on coordinating curriculum between 
i buildings/grades. Technology may be the key to this model. 

In order to continue our success and adjust to new needs 
will require that change in several areas occur concurrently. 
I Any one aspect affects all of the other. Acceptance that all 
I children can learn demands new teaching strategies, new 
i methods of organizing the school day/year and collaboration 
| with the home as well as with town agencies and other health 
land social service agencies. Through a comprehensive plan 
! that recognizes the connection of all parts that affect the 
end result, success is imminent. 

Finally, I wish to heartily thank the parents and 
townspeople of Medf ield for their support as well as 
: providing us with the quality students whom we have the good 
fortune to educate. I also want to thank the teachers and 
support staff who continue to produce student achievement re- 
sults that can only be categorized as exemplary and the ad- 
ministration, who decipher, organize and help put the entire 
package together. I am extremely proud of our school system 
and know that you, too, share in the recognition of 
Medf ield' s outstanding educational record. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas M. Re is 
Superintendent of Schools 



107 



REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



To the Superintendent of Schools 



The period of January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1994 

was a year of redefinition in meeting the requirements of the 

Educational Reform Act of 1993 within the structure of our 
school finances. 






CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

"What Should Students Know and When Should They Know 
It?" has become a major thrust in our examination of 
curriculum at all disciplines within grade levels. 
Redefining content standards within the core of learning 
frameworks is a major focus in our education reform 
movement. The school site councils have created effective 
improvement plans in support of this movement. Each reflects 
an active role of parents and community in counseling the 
process of decision-making which principals assume through 
their site-based management accountability and responsibility 
Although there can be a natural resistance to change, the 
various levels have driven forward to remove the status quo. 
Collaboration and innovation have become the key to forward 
movement in advancing curriculum and instruction within the 
school system. 

An integrated curriculum and instruction is one example 
of this forward movement. As we experience the beginnings of 
its success at the elementary and secondary levels, students 
are demonstrating results. 

Three characteristics in student learning have surfaced. 
Our students are being motivated by showing how skills and 
concepts mastered in one area can help them be successful in 
other areas. 

Secondly, our professional staff is experiencing 
improved comprehension by helping students see the natural 
connection and real life relevance of what they are learning. 

Lastly, problem-solving skills are providing students 
with multiple opportunities to apply what they are learning 
in different context. 

As our professional staff moves toward a broader 
understanding of the nature of integrated curriculum and 
instruction, a new focus evolves which places greater 
emphasis on teaching skills and outcomes, rather than simply 
"covering" the curriculum, and working collaboratively with 
other teachers from other subject areas and grade levels. 

This past year has provided a spirit of enthusiasm which 
encouraged further growth in curriculum and instruction 
within and among all grade levels. 



108 



SCHOOL FINANCE 

Principal are investigating various restructuring 
[possibilities. As restructuring efforts mature, many will 
jevolve from our in-service sessions that review effective 
school research to serious attempts to redesign our schools. 

Time, our most precious resource, is used for staff 
development, meetings for school improvement plans, collegial 
sessions for teaming and interdisciplinary planning, activi- 
ties to encourage parental involvement and strategic/ long- 
planning. These activities drive up expenditures for faculty 
released time, conference and travel, new curriculum 
materials and new programs; and career and technical prep 
implementation . 

As acquiring technology and designing different 
environments for an increased enrollment create a need for 
more funding, the economic environment of our community is 
clearly working toward keeping above the required net school 
spending. 

During the past year, moderate spending and the rising 
cost of support services for students have forced choices 
between buying library books and painting the hallway, 
putting blinds over windows and sending teachers to 
professional conferences. 

Creating better schools and preparing for the year 2000 
cannot be addressed by shifting priority spending. Our 
schools work with human resources. We can only downsize to a 
reasonable level before the results surface, as experienced 
this past year with increased class sizes throughout the 
school system. Human resources will always be a major 
portion of our school finances. Improved facility needs will 
follow. 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

The school system's local professional development plan 
is consistent with the definition set by the Massachusetts 
Department of Education. The foundation for our program has 
been designed to promote new learning, evident in changed 
behavior within teachers and students, gained by 
opportunities to become aware, to observe, practice, reflect 
and refine teaching methods. Annual review of this plan will 
ensure that it continues to reflect the goals of the school 
system. 

SUMMARY 

Maintaining a strong curriculum and an effective 
instructional environment for all students in the presence of 
tight money is a major challenge. We have and will continue 
to search for additional financial funding beyond the 
traditional. 



109 



Thank you for your continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert J. Berardi, Ed.D. 

Assist. Superintendent of Schools 




Middle School's Annual Historic House display. 
(Courtesy of Suburban Press) 



110 



REPORT OF THE AMOS CLARK 
KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of Medfield High School, I respectfully 
submit our Annual Report for the school year ending December 
31, 1994. 

The official enrollment of the high school for the 
1993-94 school year is 489. There were 107 students who 
graduated in the Class of 1994. Of those, 96.2% have gone on 
to post secondary education. 

This year was marked by outstanding achievement on the 
part of many students. Among its graduates, 18% were members 
of the National Honor Society. Jennifer Karnakis and Lisa 
Halliday were Valedictorian and Salutatorian respectively. A 
number of students were honored for academic excellence by 
the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. The commended 
students, based on their 1993 PSAT scores, were Allison 
Bruns, Meredith Dunn, Edward Felton, Jacob Hall, Joseph 
Jordan, Katherine Kearney, Brad Pantuck, Darius Rad, Alison 
Rainey, Tiffany Rinne and Kristen Terrenzi. 

Over 94% of our graduating seniors took the College 
Board Examinations. Our SAT and Achievement scores were well 
above the state and local averages. We are pleased to 
announce that our verbal mean score was 473 and our 
mathematics mean score was 519. 

Medfield High School students not only excelled in the 
classroom but also in many areas of extracurricular 
activities. Over seventy-five per cent of the student body 
participated in our interscholastic athletic program. Many 
of our teams made tournament: boys soccer, volleyball, boys 
basketball, girls basketball, ice hockey, boys tennis and 
softball. 

During the past year the high school administration 
began a process of renovation and addition to the high school 
facility. Construction, which was originally scheduled to 
begin in March, began in June after the school year had 
ended. Extensive renovation was completed to many of the 
general classroom areas in the building. A new roof was 
added to the structure and new windows were added to all 
exterior locations. By the opening of school in September 
major work had been completed on the new science and 
technology addition. Through both the summer and fall 
construction, the building continued to be occupied and the 
educational environment was minimally disrupted. The total 
project has a tentative completion date of September 1995. 

As principal of Medfield High School, I am more than 
satisfied with the many positive happenings which have taken 
place in our school community. 



111 



I would like to take this opportunity to thank the 
Medfield School Committee, the Superintendent of Schools, the 
Assistant Superintendent and the many parents and community 
groups for their continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert C. Maguire 
Principal 




Graduation Day - 1994 
(Courtesy of Suburban Press) 



112 



GRADUATION EXERCISES 



OF 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 




CLASS OF 1994 



Sunday, June 5, 1994 — 2:00 P.M. 



113 



PROGRAM 

PROCESSIONAL Class of 1994 

THE NATIONAL ANTHEM Kelly Fhser 

Class of 1994 

OPENING REMARKS Thomas Reis 

Superintendent of Schools 

WELCOME EricPalson 

President, Class of 1994 

MESSAGE TO GRADUATING CLASS Robert Maguire 

Principal 

HONOR ESSAYS Jennifer Karnakis, Valedictorian 

Lisa Halliday, Salutatorian 

PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIFT Jack Finley 

Treasurer, Class of 1994 

MESSAGE TO THE CLASS OF 1994 William A. Tosches, 

Chairman, Medfield School Committee 

PRESENTATION OF AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

Honor Awards Robert Maguire 

Student Council Awards Principal 

Albert W. Fleming Insurance Trust Scholarships 

Special Recognition Award William A. Tosches, Chairman 

Medfield School Committee 

University of Hartford Alumni Scholarship Clarence Purvis 

CIBA Coming Diagnostics Scholarships Medfield School Committee 

Mount Ida College Scholarship Sharon Semeraro 

American Legion Auxiliary Spirit Medfield School Committee 

of Youth Scholarship 

College of The Holy Cross Scholarships Fayre Stephenson 

Southeastern Massachusetts Arenas Scholarship Medfield School Committee 

Massachusetts Biotechnology Council Mark Wilson 

New York Institute of Technology Scholarship Medfield School Committee 
Dr. Theodore K. Steele Memorial Scholarship 

Friends of Medfield Library Amy Fiske Memorial Award Dorrie Kanter 

Medfield School Boosters Awards Julia Kerr 

Medfield School Spirit Awards 

Medfield Teachers Association Book Awards Robin Scharak 

Norfolk County Teachers Association Award 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 Medals Ernie Roy 

American Legion Scholarships 
American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarship 
In memory of Ed Duhamel 



114 



Medfield Youth Basketball Association Thomas Cowell 

Bob Porack Memorial Awards 
M.H.S. Athletic Association Scholar/Athlete Awards 

Medfield High School Theatre Society Awards Regina O'Connor 

Robert Belmont Track and Field Team Spirit Award Stewart Palmer 

Medfield Music Association Scholarship Karen Bruns 

Lowell Mason Music Education Scholarship Richard Pearson 

Peter Panciocco Memorial Scholarship Richard Berks 

Proud to be Substance Free Scholarship Laura Cohen 

& Elizabeth Palmieri 

Prudential Page Realty Scholarship Susan Carney 

In memory of Roger C. Rao Assistant Principal 

Benjamin Franklin Savings Bank Scholarship 
Medfield Ladies Spring Tennis Scholarship 
Christopher Naughton Memorial Scholarship 

Amy Fiske American Field Service Scholarship Amy Glennon 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarships William F. Nourse 

National Honor Society Scholarships Richard Shapiro 

Hannah Adams Woman's Club Scholarships Claudette O'Brien 

Hannah Adams/Cecile Levesque Memorial Scholarship 

Medfield Lions Club Scholarships Paul Hinkley 

Medfield Police Association Scholarship Robert Naughton 

Medfield Women's Association Scholarship Laura Brown 

American Legion Women's Auxiliary Sheila Roy 

Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarship 

Medfield Employers & Merchants Organization Scholarship Mark Cerel 

Dental Health Services Scholarship Dr. Brian Thomas 

The Marilyn Juda Education Scholarship Ernest Wetzel 

Potpourri Collection Scholarships William Knowles 

Medfield Youth Sports Boosters Scholarships Robert Dennehy 

Robert Flagg Memorial Scholarship Elizabeth Flagg Proe 

Youth Advisory Commission Scholarships Mary Gi//fs 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS* 

William A. Tosches, Chairman, Medfield School Committee 

Thomas Reis, Superintendent of Schools 

Robert C. Maguire, Principal 

RECESSIONAL Class of 1994 

*Please refrain from applause until all graduates have received their diplomas. 



115 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES — CLASS OF 1994 



Anjanette Marie Alpher 
Keith Gordon AngeJl Jr. 
Brendan John Baird 
Brian Michael Baker 
Donald Scott Beal 
Kathryn Ann Benoit 
Jeffrey Thayer Berks 
Shawn Aric Bruhl 
Kristen Ruth Brum 
Christopher Johnson 

Burbank 
David Francis Cahifl 
Ethan Alexander Cain 
Kendra Marie Callahan 
Rebecca Lorraine Carrigan 
Paul Joseph Catalano 
Andrea LynneCecca 
* Fletcher James Clarcq 
Demck Carleton Clark 
Kerri Anne Comeau 
Kelly Lee Crawford 
Lisa Ann Crawford 
Kristen Elizabeth Crowley 
*Mark Brandon Cutter 
Abigail Lamson D'Amaro 
Jennifer Ann Daniek 
Scott Michael Davidson 
*Dawd Peter Delio 

*t Valerie Anne Dolan 

*|Eric Scott DuBrow 
Jonathan Edward EXmn 
Stephanie Jane LXiquette 
Jack Keith Finley 
Judith Anne Rtzpatrick 
Amy Brooke Fletchall 
Scott David Fletcher 
*Kel)y Bea Fbser 



Samantha LeeForde 
David John Foscaldo 
Aislyn Renee Gelcrman 

*tBlen Louise Gray 

*tLisa Ann Halliday 

Daniel Jon Hamilton 
tEileen Marie Harney 
Sean Patrick Harrington 
Jessica Leigh Hervey 
Jason William Hewett 
Kristen Michelle Higgins 
Andrea Marie iafofla 
Heather Lynne Johnson 

*t Jennifer Andrea Kamakis 
Jonathan Mark Keefe 
Melissa Prescott Kelcourse 
Deborah Famum Kerr 
Elizabeth Joan Wempa 
Susan Meredith Krause 
Misty Nicole LaPlante 
Michelle Lee Legere 
Arianne Nicole Lorett 
Gregory Michael Maser 
*Sara Elizabeth Mastronarcfi 
*Karen Ann McCormick 
Ellen Marie McKetchnie 
Andrew Gordon McLaughlin 
Jon Bradford McMillan 

*t Brendan David McNulty 

*tMarc Richard Mercadante 
John Louis Mezzanotte QI 
Brian John Morrissey 
Gary Kimball Moss 
Keith Alan Noonan 
James Emmett Clarence 

Norgaard 
Karen Louse Norton 



Tara Marie O' Donovan 
Daniel Michael OToole 
Eric Barry Palson 
Todd Davis Pember 
Marisa Ann Perante 
*Lisa Christine Petras 
Neila Marie Rgott 
Peter John Poulakis 
Sarah Elizabeth Pronovost 
Kiran Chintalapati Raju 
Kiara Reyes 

*tJessica Lynne Riceberg 
Alejandro Garcia Romero 
Daniel Jonathan Rosen 
Daniel John Ruzzo 

*fSteven Emre Schveighoffer 
Nicholas Joseph Scobbo ID 
Danielle Marie Seeley 
Rachel Marie Sessa 
Sarah Lynn Smith 
Nathaniel G. Stephenson 
Mara Anne Strier 
Anthony Graham Strong 
♦Catherine Margaret Sullivan 

Elizabeth Downie Sullivan 
♦Jesse Wall Sullivan 
David Douglas Tabor 
Brian Matthew Tempel 
Christine Marie Tempesta 
Christopher Matthew Towers 
Eleanna Stavros Virvidaki 
Jessica Lee Walsh 
Gregory C. Weinstock 
Sangeeta Welankwar 
Nikki Winston 

*t Melissa Lee Mei Woo 



MARSHALLS 
Allison Foley Eileen Whelan 

Ndlional Honor Soaety 
tUpptfr 10% of the yrodudlmy cU*s academically 



116 



REPORT OF THE THOMAS A. BLAKE 
MIDDLE SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is my pleasure to submit the Thomas A. Blake Middle 
School's Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1994. 

WINTER 

As a part of the Educational Reform Act, Curriculum 
Frameworks Committees were formed by the Massachusetts De- 
partment of Education. Educators were chosen by an interview 
process from applicants across the state. Mrs. Linda Lola, 
Reading Content Specialist K-12, was chosen to be on the En- 
glish Curriculum Frameworks. This Committee is charged with 
writing a document that will serve as a guide for language 
arts curricula across the state. The new MEAP tests will be 
based on it. 

In February the annual "Old Medfield on Display" took 
place, the end result of three months of research by the 
students on individuals in Medfield' s past. The students made 
extensive use of the Medfield Historical Society, Town Hall, 
Vine Lake Cemetery and the Dedham Registry of Deeds. Students 
also used the state and federal archives and the Morman 
Genealogical Research Center to complete their projects. 

Answering an appeal for help by Fire Chief Kingsbury to 
shovel out fire hydrants due to the record amounts of snow, 
the 8th graders took part in a community service project 
whereby they "adopted" a hydrant near their home and kept it 
shoveled out during the winter. Over 14 hydrants were kept 
clear throughout the winter. 

SPRING 

Joseph McHugh, a teacher at the Middle School for 
twenty-eight years, was chosen as Medfield' s nominee for 
Norfolk County Teacher of the Year. 

Again this year, 135 eighth graders went to Washington, 
D.C. and Colonial Williamsburg for four days. The students, 
under the direction of numerous parents conducted a series of 
fund-raisers to help pay for the trip. 

During the 8th grade graduation exercises Emily Harrison 
received the Madelyn Greene Award for excellence in English 
and Megan Kelly received the Blanche Kingsbury Award for 
excellence in History. 

All eighth grade students took the state assessment 
tests given to every Massachusetts 4th, 8th and 10th grade 
student. The Middle School scored exceptionally well on the 
Massachusetts State Assessment tests given in the spring to 
8th graders. Compared with all the other middle schools in 



117 



the state we ranked: 1st in Social Studies, 2nd in Mathemat- 
ics, 3rd in Reading, 2nd in Writing and 6th in Science. 

The students scored high in all areas. Making note of 
the high Medfield scores, WCVB, Channel 5 in Boston, featured 
the 8th grade social studies class on their Five on Education 
segment of the evening news. 

Eighth grade students took part in a mock Town Meeting 
unit in social studies. Students were assigned to over 
eighty town officials. The students shadowed their assigned 
official and attended the committee meetings during February 
and March. The students conducted their own mock town meet- 
ing during the day of the town's Annual Town Meeting and then 
attended the actual Town Meeting during the evening. 

SUMMER 

Amanda Surette, a seventh grader, was chosen by People 
To People to visit Australia as a student ambassador. 

Dorrie Krause, Susan Steinkeler and Joseph McHugh were 
chosen by the Harvard University Graduate School of Education 
to participate in the summer Institute on Writing, Reading 
and Civic Education. 

Blake Middle School housed eight high school classrooms 
while the renovation project continued. The presence of the 
older students raised no issues as we shared the space 
beautifully. 

Also, the school council advised the principal during 
the budget process and jointly worked on and presented a 
school improvement plan for the 1994-95 school year. The 
committee's help produced a well thought-out plan for the fu- 
ture. 

FALL 

Due to budget constraints, the number of sections for 
sixth grade was determined to be seven. This made the aver- 
age class size 24.4 Three sections of above average math 
were over thirty. In December, the School Committee voted to 
add a section after the December vacation. In another cost 
saving move, Exploratory Language was cut from the program, 
but was added on in late August. 

A Library Skills course was offered to all sixth graders 
once a week for the first time in September. Students were 
taught about the technology available in the library as well 
as note-taking and assessing fiction and non-fiction books. 
Both English and math classes offered the inclusionary model 
in one section. A regular education teacher and a special 
education teacher co-taught the classes. 

Grade 7 continued to develop our interdisciplinary unit 
on Immigration. This year over a dozen parent volunteers as- 
sisted the teachers during the interdisciplinary group 



118 



meetings. A baseball card project devoted to honoring the 
accomplishments of individual immigrants from each ethnic 
group was added as a requirement for every student. The 
projects fair called Ellis Island Revisited was streamlined 
with the plywood figures displayed in the gym and presenta- 
tions taking place in our large meeting rooms. The culminat- 
ing activity was a day trip to Ellis Island and New York 
City. 

Inclusion classes were started in both English and 
mathematics. In these classes regular education and special 
needs students are mixed together and are taught by the 
regular education teacher and the learning specialist, 
middle school and high school staff received training in this 
model during the spring semester. 

The middle school started a homeroom advisory program in 
September. Almost every staff member was given a homeroom 
lowering the student/teacher ratio to 1 to 16. During the 
once a week advisory meetings important topics are discussed. 
Teachers also check assignment books and give out our 
communication packets. 

David Mederios, a seventh grader, won the National 
Geography Bee school competition. We continue to stress the 
importance of geography. 

The middle school staff received training in the World 
of Difference Program. The program is aimed at learning to 
accept the differences in others and to help solve racial, 
ethnic or religious discrimination. 

Parents were involved in our program more this year than 
any other year in the past. They helped purchase and cut out 
the plywood figures for the immigration unit. Over a dozen 
parents assisted the teachers during the interdisciplinary 
group meetings of the immigration unit and several 
volunteered for each of the ten days. Twenty-one parents 
volunteered to chaperone the Ellis Island Field Trip. The 
unit could not have been conducted and would not have been 
successful without the high degree of parent involvement. 

All 8th grade students studied and reviewed the 
candidates for office and the ballot questions that appeared 
on the November ballot as well as watched the Kennedy-Romney 
debates. As a way to involve the students in the election 
process and for the students to perform a community 
service, "reminding the citizens to vote," 140 eighth graders 
lined Rt.109 from Medfield Center to Robert Sproul Road with 
their signs urging support for different candidates and the 
ballot questions. 

Eighth graders continued again this year to take part in 
the Charles River interdisciplinary unit, held over a one 
week period. Students reported to five different day-long 
curriculum workshops that dealt with different aspects of the 
Charles River. The eighth grade annual King Philip War bike 
trip was incorporated into the unit and expanded to cover an 



119 



eleven mile route of historic sites in Medfield and Millis 
related to the Indian attack of Medfield in 1676. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert H. White, D.Ed. 
Principal 




Teacher Richard DeSorgher with 8th Graders on tour of 
Medfield' s historic sites. (Courtesy of Suburban Press) 



120 



REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of the Dale Street School, this will be my 
twenty-sixth Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 
1994. 

Enrollment 

Enrollment figures at Dale Street as of October 1, 1994 
were 169 students in grade four and 185 in grade five. 
Average class size for grade four was 24.1 and for grade five 
was 23.1. At this writing additional sections will be needed 
for grade four for the 1995-96 school year due to the number 
of students in the present grade three (19 5 students) . 
Keeping class size at a reasonable number is a priority for 
the coming year. As the school population continues to grow 
at Dale Street School the necessity of more space for 
classrooms such as the Central Office and School Committee 
Room will have to be utilized. 

Instructional Highlights 

The staff who are participating in the Reach Out to 
Schools Program at Wellesley College are Heidi Gibson, Susan 
Woodman, Mike Mason and Margaret Anderson. This program 
emphasizes positive approaches in the classroom. All 
classroom teachers by the end of this year will have been 
trained. Margaret Anderson, School Psychologist, conducted a 
six-week parent workshop. Parents were introduced to 
communication and problem-solving skills that the children 
are learning in the classroom. They were taught how to 
extend these concepts into parenting situations at home. 

Reading continues to be reassessed and refined. The 
balanced program which consists of whole literature, teacher 
directed skills via the Macmillan Reading series, journal 
response writing, reading aloud, reading independently and 
home connection program has been updated. 

Standardized reading tests were administered to 
determine student's vocabulary and comprehensive skills. 

The Massachusetts Assessment test results revealed that 
last year grade four students performed well above the state 
average and compared favorably to other communities of 
similar size and background. 

The grade five students were involved in a special 
program entitled "Youth and the Law." Emphasis was placed on 
an understanding of the legal system and to strengthen 
attitudes toward respect for property and others. A visit to 
the Dedham District Court to witness a trial and to listen to 
a presentation by a judge was the first session of the 



121 



program. Guest speakers included merchants, police and) 
attorneys who discussed such areas as theft and vandalism. 
Follow up lessons and written assignments were conducted by 
the classroom teachers. 

Officer Ray Burton continued the grade five DARE 
Program. The curriculum included topics such as "learn to 
say NO", self esteem, assertiveness and learning to make the 
right decision. The What's It Like Program in grade four is 
now part of the health curriculum. Kim Cave and her class 
prepared and implemented a meaningful assembly for all fourth 
grade students. Classroom instruction conducted by Pauline 
Carey, health teacher, and her assistant, Karen McCabe, 
emphasized to students an awareness and understanding of 
differences among themselves and others. 

Instrumental and band lessons were held for 
approximately sixty students during the school day. 
Students' lessons were scheduled on a rotating basis on 
Wednesdays and Fridays. String lessons were reinstituted at 
Dale Street in grade four. Participation, attendance and 
enthusiasm have been at a high level for both programs. 

Public and Parental Involvement 

A Reading Curriculum Night was held in the fall to 
inform parents of our reading and library program. Mary 
Cauldwell, Reading Specialist, and Ann Lawless-Croak, IMC 
Specialist, conducted an overview of the curriculum and 
presented ideas as to how the home can help children in 
reading. 

The School Advisory Council presented an improvement 
plan at the end of the year to strengthen communication with 
parents. As a result of this effort teachers sent out 
monthly newsletters, grade level curriculum expectations were 
given to parents and the school newsletter incorporated more 
systemwide school news. A separate telephone line was 
installed for the Adult Education Director so that our lines 
would be more open to parents. 

Future Trends 

At this writing a search committee is screening and 
interviewing applicants for a new principal at Dale Street 
School. This position will be finalized by May. As the 
school population expands and the number of sections increase 
in each grade the entire building will eventually be utilized 
for grades four and five. It will be necessary to move the 
central and pupil services personnel offices to another 
location. 

The Educational Reform Legislation may have an effect on 
our school calendar, hours, activities and professional 
development days. 

School Site Councils will be an important group in 
providing input to the decision-making process as well as to 



122 



make recommendations regarding school budgets, class size and 
school procedures. 



I would like to express my appreciation to 
professional teachers, to a loyal and 
secretarial staff, to the support and cooperat 
and parents groups and to Chris Taft, Director 
Arts, for arranging excellent performances for 
The custodians, cafeteria and bus personne 
contributions to the total operations of the 
effort of everyone is sincerely appreciated. 



dedicated and 
conscientious 

ion of the CSA 
of Performing 
our students. 

1 made their 
school. The 



Respectfully submitted, 



Frank Hoffman 
Principal 




Dale Street School National Spelling Bee Finalists 



123 



REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

Please accept this report regarding the educational 
programs and co-curricular activities of the Ralph Wheelock 
School for the year ending December 31, 1994. As Principal, 
this is my third annual report for the town of Medfield. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

The Wheelock School is proud to have an enrollment of 
638 students as of October 1, 1994: 204 in grade one, 234 in 
grade two, 194 in grade three and 6 in a substantially 
separate class. We currently have nine sections of first, 
ten sections of second grade and nine sections of third 
grade. Due to our increased enrollment, the Wheelock School 
hired two new classroom teachers the 1994-95 school 
year - one for Grade Three and another for Grade One. We 
also have hired a new Speech and Language pathologist and a 
new Occupational Therapist. Due to the size of the Wheelock 
School, a part-time assistant to the principal was 
implemented for the 1994-95 school year. 

A study committee to review the options for reorganizing 
the elementary schools recommended to move Grade One to 
Memorial School for the 1994-95 school year. This plan, 
however, was postponed to relieve the FY95 School Budget. 
The result of this decision is a school which is 
exceptionally crowded. Information regarding the impact of 
an overcrowded school was shared with the School Space Needs 
Committee in the fall so as to begin future planning for 
elementary school space needs. It is expected that the Grade 
One move will occur in the summer of 1995. 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

Staff members at the Wheelock School continued a long 
tradition of participating in Professional Development 
programs within the school day and outside of our school 
environment. Programs offered under the school's auspices 
included a long-term program on Developmental Education, 
exploration of new trends in mathematics education, and 
continued training in meeting the needs of different types of 
learners within the regular education classroom. Specific 
training in new science materials from the National Science 
Resource Center on The Lifecycle of the Painted Lady 
Butterfly and Balancing and Weighing occurred for second 
grade teachers through the Merrimack Education Center in 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts. These two programs are currently 
being used within the second grade science curriculum to 
ensure a hands-on approach to teaching science. Similar 
units are being explored by the grade one teachers for the 
1995-96 school year. 



124 



Summer Research and Development projects at the Wheelock 
School included revising the Grade One Health Program, 
recreating the "What's It Like?" curriculum to an 
Understanding Disabilities Program for the entire school and 
extending our Reach Out to Schools Program to a school-wide 
initiative. Almost all staff members have been trained in 
this model through Wellesley College to promote Social 
Competency. The school now represents this model in all 
forms of school rules and regulations and expectations for 
student behavior. 

The reading program at the Wheelock School continued to 
receive our attention this year through the pursuit of 
classroom materials to match the philosophy of our Balanced 
Reading Program. A number of programs were selected to pilot 
during the 1994-95 school year through presentations made by 
various publishing companies. Two teachers at each grade 
level are working with literature based programs published by 
Silver-Burdett and Houghton-Mifflin. These teachers and the 
reading specialist worked through the summer to ensure a 
successful pilot program. 

The Wheelock School opened its new Mac Lab in March of 
1994 with great interest on the part of the members of the 
Wheelock community. Teachers spent a great deal of time 
exploring the uses of curriculum related software, word 
processing and teacher record-keeping programs. Parents 
further supported the Lab through their volunteer efforts. 

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT 

Members of the Wheelock School Council worked through 
the winter and spring to develop a School Improvement Plan to 
address areas of need within the school. The final plan for 
the 1994-95 school year was presented to the School Committee 
in June of 1994. Our plan addressed specific concerns 
regarding 1) Curriculum, 2) Communication and 3) Scheduling. 
In response to this School Improvement Plan, a number of 
parent programs were offered in the fall to provide 
information regarding the school's reading program and its 
math and science curricula. Two study groups were initiated 
to address the areas of scheduling and communication. 

Begun in the previous year, our adoptive grandparent 
program - Project WISH (Wonderful Individuals Supporting and 
Helping) - continued to grow. Through Mrs. Margaret Jenkins' 
assistance, the school currently has nine wonderful 
individuals working with our young children. Their presence 
in the school has enhanced the sense of community we are 
trying to establish. 

Third Grade parents were invited to attend a Gym Show 
under the direction of the elementary Physical Education 
staff in March. The purpose of the evening was to demonstrate 
the concepts and approaches utilized over the course of a 
child's gym period and to foster common fitness in families. 
Additional new co-curricular programs included the formation 
of a substance free club for second and third grade students, 



125 



expansion of Project Extend and 
afterschool foreign language program 



implementation of an 



The Performing Arts Programs for the year included Jim 

Schreider - the Math Wizard; storyteller Joanne Wong; Nat 

Love Scot Cannon - Open the Door; and Lovers, Rogues and 
Thieves - an introduction to the opera. 

Our Community School Association (CSA) had another 
successful year in fund-raising and providing financial 
support to the school's programs and students. Under the 
leadership of Mary jean Ingram and Louise Steinkrauss, the CSA 
supported our Social Competency Program, emergent literature 
materials for Grade One and various other materials needed at 
the school. Their fund-raising events continued to bring 
together the staff, parents and children within our 
community. 

FUTURE 

The Wheelock School will begin to look different after 
June of 1995. Our Grade One students and teachers will move 
to the Memorial School, thus permitting us to once again have 
a music room, a full learning center, a therapy room for 
Occupational and Physical Therapy and space to do the things 
young children need to do. Our attention will remain on 
reading and mathematics for curriculum development and 
evaluation. The staff remains a highly motivated group of 
professionals working towards the betterment of each child 
attending the school. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Susan A. Whitten 
Principal 




Wheelock School Students 
126 



REPORT OF THE MEMORIAL SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

This report for the Memorial School is for the school 
year ending December 31, 1994. 

The Class of 2007 was welcomed to the Memorial 
Kindergarten with individual home visitations and an open 
house. 

Enrollment and Staff 

Enrollment for the kindergarten was 242 students. There 
were eleven sections of kindergarten with six in the morning 
and five in the afternoon session. The average class size 
was 23 students. The integrated kindergarten consisted of a 
small class of 15 students with a full time aide. This 
program gave students more individual instruction and helped 
best meet the needs of students. 

The staff member participating in the Reach Out to 
School Program is Mrs. Ann Imbrogna. Most staff members have 
completed the program. The program at Wellesley College 
gives teachers ideas to provide alternatives for problem 
solving and to help children establish better relationships 
with each other. All of the teachers attended the New 
England Kindergarten Conference to gain additional ideas for 
their classroom. 

Parent/Staff Involvement 

Parent conferences continue to be an important means of 
communication. Every parent had at least two 15-20 minute 
appointments with teachers to discuss their child's progress. 

The Site Council worked with the Principal in the 
formulation of school improvement plans for the school that 
focused on school libraries, support services, instructional 
time and nutritional snacks. 

Volunteers were a valuable source of help on a daily 
basis to the classroom teachers. 

Many wonderful and helpful items were purchased by the 
CSA for the staff and the children. 

Curriculum and Instruction 

The kindergarten curriculum incorporated the letter 
people with its exciting and meaningful activities, 
vocabulary and sounds which lead into the "Big Books" 
program. 

Many "hands on" experiences were included in the science 
and math program. 



127 



Future Trends 

The school population increase and the space problem at 
Wheelock School necessitates a change in the grade 
configuration for Memorial School for the 1995-96 school 
year. This reorganization plan which was delayed for one 
year, will include prekindergarten, kindergarten and grade 1 
at Memorial. The building will be filled to capacity and 
will have a full time principal. Additional services in 
reading, Pupil Services and all special subject areas will be 
added to address the enrollment increase. 

We hope that this plan will be feasible for the next few 
years until such time that the Space Needs Committee 
recommends a future plan for the elementary schools. 

I wish to commend the parent volunteers and the CSA for 
their support and cooperation. A team effort was required to 
make the school operate in an efficient manner. Special 
gratitude should be given to the teachers and their aides for 
their professionalism and dedication. The secretary was 
instrumental in making Memorial a productive and pleasant 
environment for everyone. Chris Taft, Director of Performing 
Arts, provided excellent programs for the children throughout 
the school year. The team effort of everyone contributed to 
the total operation of the Memorial School. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank Hoffman 
Principal 




Memorial School Students 



128 



Students 


Pec. 


1. 1993 


ages 3-5 




30 


ages 6-17 




243 


ages 18-21 




7 

280 



REPORT OF THE PUPIL SERVICES DEPARTMENT 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I wish to submit the Pupil Services Department report 
for the year ending December 31, 1994. 

Special Education 

For the third consecutive year, our special needs census 
has remained relatively constant. 

pec. 1, 1994 

30 

249 



284 

Most of our children receive their services within our 
school system as indicated below: 

Special Education Figures Only Dec. 1. 1993 Dec. 1. 1994 

Integrated Preschool 
Integrated Kindergarten 
Wheelock Sub-Separate 
Dale Co-Teaching 
Middle School Sub-Separate 
Collaborative Placements 
Private Day 
Private Residential 

We have continued to expand the numbers of children 
receiving special education services in regular education 
classrooms. Approximately 70% - 80% of our children 
preschool through grade 5 are involved in inclusion, though 
the percentages are somewhat lower at the middle and high 
school levels. 

We have been able to provide teacher training in the 
inclusion model through grant funding. Dr. Deborah Merriam 
and Dr. Jerry Goldberg have been helpful to our classroom 
teachers in providing this professional development training. 

Preschool Services /Programs 

We continue to operate four, half -day early childhood 
programs at Memorial School. While we would like to increase 
our programming, space is prohibitive. We have 25 four year 
olds and 21 three year olds who are eager participants in our 
integrated preschool programs. These programs are supported 
fully by tuitions and grant funding. 



129 



8 


5 


2 


6 


6 


6 





11 


11 


10 


6 


5 





2 


2 


2 



We have received, with gratitude, the following dona- 
tions from parents of our preschoolers: Mr. & Mrs. Douglas 
Landfield, a picnic table and a CD player; Mr. & Mrs. Michael 
Weiner, a sandbox and a log cabin; and Mr. & Mrs. Joseph 
Freeman, a video camera. 

Guidance Services 

School opened in September with a full time guidance 
counselor assigned to the middle school. We also began 
para-professional assistance in the guidance suite last 
winter and have been fortunate to extend this assistance 
through this school year because of a grant. 

The Guidance Information System and our two high school 
counselors have continued to provide assistance to our stu- 
dents and their parents as well as our high school staff and 
administrators . 

Once again, we are happy to be able to relate that our 
children are involved in individual and group guidance from 
grades 6 through 12 . 

Health Services 

School nurses are ever vigilant in maintaining a healthy 
school environment. A great deal of their time and attention 
is devoted to health services, adhering to State requirements 
for immunizations, screenings, education and participation at 
team meetings for special education. Our nurses are also re- 
quired to do home visits as recommended by the school plan- 
ning team. 

Postural screening was conducted for 724 children in 

grades 5,6,8 and 9. Twenty-eight children were referred to 

their physicians for further evaluation and, of that number, 
nineteen had confirmed findings. 

Two hundred twenty-three youngsters were screened for 
kindergarten last year with the assistance of school 
personnel, trained volunteers and Dr. Stewart Galeucia. 
Additional volunteers assisted our nurses in completing vi- 
sion and hearing screening for 2138 preschool and school age 
students. As always, we acknowledge our inability to conduct 
so many screenings for our children without this assistance. 
We are grateful to these dedicated professionals and trained 
volunteers who unselfishly donate their time and expertise to 
our children. 

Personnel 

Mr. James McCarthy retired as part-time guidance 
counselor at Blake Middle School. This caring man worked in 
our schools for thirty-four years. He has been replaced by 
full time counselor, Ms. Melissa Brodie. 

Mrs. Kathleen Molloy began working last winter in the 
Blake Middle School guidance department as a para- 



130 



professional. Her employment last year and this has been a 
result of grant funding. 

Mrs. Carol Baine elected to work half time as a 
psychologist at the High School this year. Her Middle School 
responsibilities have been assumed by Mrs. Susan Golden who 
also works part-time at Memorial School. 

Mrs. Carol Amato chose not to return after a two-year 
leave. Consequently, the full time speech/ language position 
at Wheelock School has been filled by Mrs. Patricia Lave lie. 

Mrs. Kristin Mawhinney provided years of occupational 
therapy for diagnosed children throughout the system. She 
chose not to return this year and has been replaced by Mrs. 
Joy Chen. 

In order to expand inclusion at the Middle School, Mrs. 
Elaine Kepple McCarthy was hired as a halftime learning 
specialist. 

Ms. Ann Lassotovitch was hired as a part-time nurse at 
Dale Street School in order to allow Mrs. Cardell to spend 
additional time at Memorial School as part of our rental 
agreement to our specials needs collaborative. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lois E. Lambert 

Director of Pupil Services 



131 






REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD 
ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

This is my second year as the Director of Community 
Education. In this position also I have directed the Adult 
Education Program. The winter semester, which continues to 
offer twenty different courses for the community, has just 
begun . 



This past year Mary Counihan took over 
Enrichment Program and ran it very successfully. 



the Summer 



We are also in the second semester of our intramural 
programs. Terri O'Brien directs the program at the Dale 
Street School and Nancy Standring directs the program at the 
Wheelock School. 

All programs have retained strong offerings of courses 
each year. These programs are continually looking to expand 
these offerings and add to our staff of teachers and 

instructors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph White 

Director of Community Education 




Medfield High School students 



132 



REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my tenth annual report as the 
Medfield Public Schools Director of Athletics for the year 
ending December 31, 1994. The interscholastic athletic 
program provides Medfield' s youth a positive, disciplined and 
enriching atmosphere in which to develop both as an athlete 
and as a person. It is my pleasure to report that 
seventy-five percent of the entire student body participated 
in athletics during the past year. This statistic alone 
reveals the integral part athletics plays in the educational 
process. In Medfield, academics and athletics go hand in 
hand; each contributing to the overall development of 
Medfield' s children. 

Boys and girls interscholastic teams were offered at 
three levels during the past year. The following is the 
entire athletic coaching staff by season: 



WINTER 
Basketball (Boys) 

Basketball (Girls) 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 

Freshman 



Herbert Grace 
Michael Mason 
Michael Douglas 

Thomas Cowell 
Pia Kunzig 

Ann-Marie Fratolillo 
Stacia Peters 



Cheering 

Ice Hockey 

Indoor Track (Boys) 

Indoor Track (Girls) 

SPRING 



Susan Medina 
Mark Trivett 
Michael Kraemer 
Michael Slason 



Baseball 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Richard Nickerson 
Martin Salka 
Herbert Grace 



Softball 

Tennis (Boys) 
Tennis (Girls) 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Betsy Dugan 
Stacia Peters 
Michael Douglas 

Vincent Joseph 

Ross Irwin 



133 



Track & Field (Boys) 

Track & Field (Girls) 

Volleyball (Boys) 

FALL 

Cheering 



Cross Country 
Field Hockey 

Football 



Soccer (Boys) 
Soccer (Girls) 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 

Varsity 



Junior Varsity 
Freshman 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 



Volleyball (Girls) Varsity 

Junior Varsity 



Edward Rock 

Michael Kraemer (Assist) 

Michael Slason 

Michael Kraemer (Assist) 

John Hastings 



Laura Horsfall 

Michael Kraemer 

Loretta Fahey 
Stacia Collins 

Vincent Joseph 
Michael Slason (Assist) 
Thomas Caruso (Assist) 
Joseph Farroba 
Christopher Quinn 

Ross Irwin 
Scott Ferguson 

Allen McCarthy 
Amy Fioretti 

John Hastings 
Michelle Buettner 



All of our interscholastic teams participated in the 
Tri-Valley League which consists of Ashland, Bellingham, 
Dover-Sherborn, Holliston, Hopkinton, Medfield, Medway, 
Millis and Westwood. Medfield is currently ranked fifth in 
the TVL in total enrollment, grades nine through twelve. The 
league is highly competitive in all sports, boys and girls. 
Tri-Valley teams traditionally are quite successful in state 
tournament play. 

Our athletic highlights begin with the winter season, 
1993-94. The girls indoor track team finished the season 
with only one loss and placed four team members on the all 
league team including Class D hurdles champion, Liz Sullivan. 
Our boys indoor team finished a strong second in the league, 
losing out to Holliston in a close meet. Boys basketball, 
coming in at 13-7, qualified for state tournament play for 
the third year in a row. They won the Viking Christmas 
Tournament held in East Bridgewater and our own Medfield Hoop 
Classic. Our girls won our Medfield Hoop Classic tournament 
for the fourth consecutive year, finished at 12-8, qualifying 
for state tournament play for the fifth year in a row. Ice 
hockey placed second in the TVL and reached the Eastern 
Massachusetts Division III finals. They won the Bellingham 
Christmas Tournament for the second year in a row and placed 
seven players on the all league team. 



134 



The spring of 1994 was filled with great performances. 
Boys tennis, with a record of 10-4, qualified for tournament 
play (fourth consecutive) . Senior, Brendan Cutter, was named 
the league's Most Valuable Player again for the fourth 
consecutive year. Our young girls team finished fifth in 
league play, finishing at 8-8. Softball, while qualifying 
for the seventeenth consecutive year, played to a 12-8 record 
and third place in the league. Baseball came in at 9-9 
overall and fourth in the Tri-Valley League. The girls track 
team dropped only one meet (8-1) in 1994, their first in 
three years. We set a new school record in the shuttle 
hurdles. Our boys placed second at 6-1 in a particularly 
strong league. Five individuals earned all league honors. 
Boys volleyball missed tournament qualification by one game 
(9-7) in only the program's second year of existence. 

Fall 1994 proved very exciting for our boys cross 
country team. They finished 5-2 with a young team. Things 
look good for 1995! Our girls team, also young, came in 
sixth in the Tri-Valley League and looks forward to next fall. 
The football team improved on all fronts with exciting wins, 
large participation and great individual performances. The 
big Thanksgiving Day victory over Dover-Sherborn was our 
third in a row over the Raiders. Seniors Mark Samman and 
Mark Giangregorio were named Homecoming and Thanksgiving 
MVP's respectively. Girls soccer was competitive in a great 
league, coming up with two victories more than in 1993. With 
nine starters returning in 1995, we look to a great season. 
The boys qualified, went 10-6-2, and finished fourth in the 
Tri-Valley League. They advanced to the Eastern 
Massachusetts Quarter finals. Volleyball finished 14-6 and 
tied for second place in the Tri-Valley League. The girls 
advanced to the Central Massachusetts finals. Co-captain 
Leslie Pao was named "Daily Transcript" Player of the Year. 
Field Hockey placed fifth in the Tri-Valley League and was a 
very competitive team. Long time (fifteen years) coach 
Loretta Fahey is stepping down and leaves a strong program in 
place. We will miss her. 

Sports recognition evenings in November, March and May 
were well attended and enthusiastically received. The annual 
All Sports Banquet, sponsored by the Medfield School Boosters 
was held in early June. Medfield High School's "Wall of 
Fame" 1993 inductees included: Earle Kerr, Class of 193 6; 
Bill Catenacci, Class of 1961; Laura Avery, Class of 1969; 
David Iverson, Class of 1972; and Susan Kallio, Class of 
1978. Each inductee was in attendance and briefly addressed 
the audience of over 500 student-athletes and parents. At 
the banquet, in addition to the individual sport MVP awards, 
Valarie Dolan, Jennifer Karnakis, Jon Dunn and Jesse Sullivan 
were named the 1993-94 Scholar/Athlete recipients. At the 
June graduation exercises, Misty LaPlante and Eric Palson 
were named recipients of the School Boosters Spirit Award. 
The Robert Porack Memorial Basketball Scholarships given by 
Medfield Youth Basketball Association (M.Y.B.A.) were awarded 
to Valarie Dolan and Sean Harrington. The Robert Belmont 
Memorial Track and Field Spirit Award was presented to Judy 
Fitzpatrick. 



135 



Tri-Valley League All Star selections for 1994 are as 
follows: 



Boys Basketball 
Girls Basketball 

Ice Hockey 



Boys Indoor Track 



Jon Dunn 

Sean Harrington 

Valarie Dolan 
Meredith Dunn 
Jennifer Daniels 

Jack Finley 
C.J. Lambert 
David Pollicelli 
Jason Thomas 
Dan Ruzzo 
Jeff Berks 

Matt Anderton 
Jason Mohan 
Brian Polagye 
Jeff Mohan 
Brian Baker 

Liz Sullivan 
Kerri Comeau 
Katy Sullivan 

Jon Dunn 
Jason Thomas 

Deb Kerr 

Stephanie Duquette 
Jill Mariani 

Lindsay Cutter 

Marc Mercadante 
Jesse Sullivan 
Bill Foran 

Scott Fletcher 
Jon McMillan 
Bryan Johnson 
Brian Polagye 
Peter Grillo 



Tri-Valley League All Star selections for 1994 (continued) 

Girls Track Katy Sullivan 

Judy Fitzpatrick 
Kerri Comeau 
Ann Spognardi 
Kate Nelson 
Julie Forbes 



Girls Indoor Track 

Baseball 
Softball 

Girls Tennis 
Boys Tennis 

Boys Track 



Volleyball (Boys) 



Scott Davidson 
Shawn Bruhl 



136 



Cross Country 



Field Hockey 



Football 



Boys Soccer 



Girls Soccer 



Volleyball (Girls) 



Matt Magyar 
Brendan Lippman 
Dave Tabor 

Brian Polagye 
Kevin Cimo 
Scott Greenaway 

Allison Foley 
Wendy-Sue Butters 
Julie Forbes 
Ann Spognardi 

Seth Hannah 

Mark Giangregorio 

Chris Leary 
Aron Frigon 
Paul Chang 

Jackie 0' Leary 
Bethany Pantuck 
Jen Tabor 
Liz McKeever 
Lindsey Tosches 

Leslie Pao 
Renee' Walcott 
Kathryn Vozzella 
Sarah Buckley 



Our fall and winter cheering teams under the guidance of 
Laura Horsfall and Susan Medina, respectively, were, as 
always, talented and creative. They constantly contribute to 
the athletic program's success by providing leadership, 
support and much enthusiasm to our teams, spectators and 
community. Year after year, their cheering and dance 
routines are without equal in the Tri-Valley League. The 
annual Homecoming Pep Rally organized by the fall 
cheering team was once again spectacular! 

This concludes my tenth annual report of the Director of 
Athletics. I would like to thank, on behalf of all the 
Warriors, the School Committee, the administration, the 
Medfield School Boosters and the community for all of their 
support throughout the year ending December 31, 1994. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas E. Cowell 
Director of Athletics 



137 



REPORT OF THE FOOD SERVICE DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with pleasure that I submit this Annual Report for 
the Food Service Department for the year ending December 31, 
1994. 

Promoting good health and nutrition has always been a 
concern. Government regulations require that lunches be 
available to all school children and the lunches must follow 
the Daily Dietary Guidelines. 

Medfield Schools' kitchens are especially concerned with 
the fat content in the weekly menus. We oven bake; we do not 
fry our food. Schools offer a variety of milk (whole, 1%, 
2%, skim and chocolate 1/2%) I try to balance the weekly 
menus with school-made products, prepared foods and the use 
of government commodities. I offer meals that I know the 
students will purchase, as well as meals that will be 
nutritionally healthy. 

The prepaid meal ticket is offered by the year, half 
year or monthly. This continues to be a success and I feel 
it is very helpful to working parents. 

Most of the food costs are on a yearly bid. Some of 
these prices have been obtained due to the fact that Medfield 
is a member of The Education Collaborative. Other bids are 
obtained from vendors. Most products are purchased by brand 
name. Managers keep me informed of products that are 
acceptable or ones we feel are unacceptable. 

During the month of September the High School kitchen 
reopened after renovation. As we were without ovens, we sold 
"deli sandwiches" and salads during that period. Equipment 
was installed and eventually we were able to serve hot meals 
once more. The high school students were offered daily the 
choice of three "deli" style sandwiches, deep dish pizza, a 
salad bar, chicken Caesar salad plate, or the regular lunch 
menu. Production and storage areas are larger; therefore, I 
do not anticipate any problem as enrollment escalates. 

The Middle School increased in enrollment and students 
purchasing lunch and snacks also increased. A part-time 
worker was hired to take cash and to help out in the kitchen. 
I am now organizing the plans to update and upgrade the 
Memorial School kitchen in order to reopen in September of 
1995. This kitchen has been closed for a number of years and 
needs a good deal of cleaning and painting, along with the 
purchase of some new equipment. 



138 



1994 Income 1994 Expenses 

Lunch receipts: $215,596.01 Food & Supplies: $120,114.56 

Vending & Functions: 19,255.37 Payroll: 134. 131.89 

Claim 33.093.40 $254,246.45 

$267,944.78 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sharon Martin 

Food Service Director 




Memorial School students visiting an apple farm. 



139 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 
OF PLANT MANAGEMENT 






To the Superintendent of Schools: 

This past year has challenged our human resources as 
well as our abilities. The postponement of the opening of 
Memorial School helped to stretch our calendar so that the 
opening of the first phase of the High School Renovation 
Project could be successfully completed. 

Notwithstanding the decision to delay in the 
reorganization of Memorial School, the maintenance and 
custodial staff moved forward with some of the preparatory 
work during the summer of 1994. There is more work to be 
done and the challenge will continue. 

As our facilities begin to experience the increased 
student enrollment, the maintenance of a healthy and safe 
learning environment is supplemented with the need to 
redesign space usage within each of the elementary schools. 
Effective management of the maintenance and custodial budget 
has enabled the department to deal with the expansion and 
redesign needs without having significant priority shifts 
within the budget. 

ENERGY CONSERVATION MEASURES 

Our partnership with Bay State Gas, through the Partners 
in Energy Program, along with a special capital warrant 
funding, enabled the implementation of the first phase of a 
number of energy conservation phases to occur. Separate 
domestic hot water systems have been installed in the Ralph 
Wheelock Elementary and Dale Street Elementary Schools. 
Independent water heaters in the same two schools have been 
installed in the cafeteria kitchens. With the implementation 
of these measures, first year operating costs savings of over 
$21,000 can be expected. This savings will be realized in 
the next calendar year. 

Within the same equal-match partnership, the Medfield 
Public Schools will continue with energy measures at the 
Memorial School. Begun in 1994, this phase will be out for 
bid and implemented during the early part of the next 
calendar year. The phase will include the installation of 
new building boiler controls, domestic hot water pipe and 
tank insulation and a rezone of building temperature 
controls. 

We are investigating an energy measure program with 
Boston Edison. If successful, the program will be 
implemented in the next calendar year. 

Hopefully, these initiatives will help to maintain a 
near level-funded budget in the future, as we have maintained 
this past year. 



140 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL RENOVATION PROJECT 

As the High School Renovation Project continues, the 
Director of Plant Management will continue to work closely 
with the High School Planning and Building Committee through 
its Project Manager and the High School Principal, Mr. Robert 
Maguire. 

Within a short period of time and with an extraordinary 
effort on everyone's part, the first phase of the school 
construction was ready for occupancy in September 1994. 

REPLACEMENT OF EXTERIOR DOORS 

Through a special capital warrant article, specified 
exterior doors at the Ralph Wheelock Elementary School and 
Thomas A. Blake Middle School were replaced. The replacement 
of these doors has enhanced the security and safety of the 
buildings. 

REMOVAL OF OIL TANKS 

The conversion to natural gas has been completed. 
Within the legal time period, in compliance with regulations, 
the oil tanks at Memorial, Dale Street, Thomas A. Blake 
Middle and the Ralph Wheelock Schools have been removed. 
Inspection by our local fire department indicated that the 
project was successful without any question of environmental 
contamination . 

RENOVATION OF THE WHEELOCK SOCCER FIELDS 

The two playing fields behind the Ralph Wheelock 
Elementary School have been renovated. A new crown was 
developed and proper grading and seeding completed. The 
fields will remain unused until the fall of 1995. 

SUMMARY 

The general care, cleaning and maintenance of the school 
facilities are a daily concern. Although the department 
works toward a high level of quality, there is always an 
attitude of doing a better job. 

Providing a safe and healthy environment for learning is 
our goal. Your continued support is needed, and greatly 
appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert Fitzgerald 

Director of Plant Management 



141 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1994 



142 






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156 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 28, 1994 

Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, greetings. 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in town affairs, to meet at the 
Memorial School, in said Medfield, on Monday, the twenty-eighth day of March, A.D., 
1994 at 6:00 o'clock A.M., then and there to act on the following articles. 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually by ballot, viz: 

One Moderator, one School Committee member, and one member of the Housing 
Authority for one year. 

One Park Commissioner, and one member of the Housing Authority for two years. 

One member of the Board of Selectmen, one Town Clerk, one Assessor, one member of 
the School Committee, two members of the Library Trustees, one Trust Fund 
Commissioner for three years. 

One member of the Planning Board and one member of the Housing Authority for five 

years. 

PROPOSITION 2 1/2 GENERAL OVERRIDE QUESTION 

Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to assess an additional $250,000 in real estate and 
personal property taxes for the purposes of the general operations of the schools, for 
which the moneys from this assessment will be used for the fiscal year beginning July 
first nineteen hundred and ninety four? 



Yes No 



PROPOSITION 2 1/2 DEBT EXCLUSION OVERRIDE QUESTION 

Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition two 
and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bond to be issued in order to 
acquire land for the protection of the Town's water supply and conservation purposes? 



Yes No 



The polls will be open at 6:00 o'clock A.M. and shall be closed at 8:00 o'clock P.M. 

On Monday, the twenty-fifth day of April, A.D., 1994, commencing at 7:30 o'clock P.M. 
the following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury School gymnasium in 
said Medfield, viz: Articles 2 thru 44. 

157 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days at least before the time of 
holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. Given unto our hands this 
fifteenth of March, AD Nineteen Hundred and Ninety-four. 

Ann B. Thompson 
Tidal B.Henry 
John T. Harney 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



158 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

TOWN ELECTION 

March 28, 1994 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with the reading of 
the warrant, and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instructions to the voters posted. 

Workers were: Mabelle Maguire, Priscilla Anderson, Anna Murphy, Sadie Carson, Nancy 
Franke, Mary MairEtienne, Emmy Mitchell, Phyllis Wdmarth, Joan Bussow, Nancy 
Preston, Marshall Chick, Beverly Hallowell, Katherine Buchanan, Francis Colella, 
Dorothea Gaughran, Elizabeth Lorden, Anna Floser, Patricia Rioux, Elmer Portman, 
Elton Bassett. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 2043. Total registered voters numbered 6353, of the voters voting. 
After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as follows: 





PRECINCT 




1 


2 3 4 


TOTAL 


306 


485 354 394 


1539 


105 


147 120 132 


504 



MODERATOR (one year) VOTE FOR ONE 
Ralph C. Copeland 
Blanks 105 147 120 132 504 2043 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (one year) VOTE FOR 

ONE 
Fayre C. Stephenson 303 430 337 381 1451 

Blanks 108 202 137 145 592 2043 



HOUSING AUTHORITY (one year) VOTE FOR 

ONE 
Mary Rogers 6 12 8 6 32 

Blanks 405 620 466 530 2011 2043 



PARK & RECREATION COMMISSION 




(two years) VOTE FOR ONE 




Heidi Oppel 


300 415 348 381 1444 


Blanks 


111 217 126 145 599 



2043 



159 



HOUSING AUTHORITY (two years) VOTE 

FOR ONE 
JaneUeRSchveighoffer 268 391308 347 1314 

Blanks 143 241 166 179 _729 2043 

TOWN CLERK (three years) VOTE FOR 

ONE 

Nanvy J. Preston 319 480 362 412 1573 

Blanks 92 152 112 114 _470 2043 

SELECTMEN (three years) VOTE FOR 

ONE 

JayW.Muir 68 79 83 132 362 

John T.Harney 193 341229 268 1031 

Bonnie L.Wren-Burgess 140 203 134 117 594 

Blanks 10 9 28 9 _56 2043 

ASSESSOR (three years) VOTE FOR 

ONE 
William D. Walsh 298 460 341 394 1493 

Blanks 113 172 133 132 550 2043 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (three years) VOTE 

FOR ONE 
William A. Tosches 278 410 318 351 1357 

Blanks 133 222 156 175 .686 2043 

LIBRARY TRUSTEE (three years) VOTE FOR 
NOT MORE THAN TWO 
Elizabeth T. Kozel 272 410 323 345 1350 

Jo-Anne L. Hooper 238 357 269 352 1216 

Blanks 312 497 356 355 1520 4086 

TRUST FUND COMMISSION (three years) 
VOTE FOR ONE 
Lisa C. Wood 285 430 330 379 1424 

Blanks 126 202 144 147_6J9 2043 

PLANNING BOARD (five years) VOTE 

FOR ONE 
David A. Franchi 267 385 317 351 1320 

Blanks 144 247 157 275 J723 2043 

HOUSING AUTHORITY (five years) VOTE 

FOR ONE 
Richard D. Jordan 284 435 326 379 1424 

Blanks 127 197 148 147 619 2043 



160 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the several Town Officers 
for the past year. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to accept the reports of the several Town Officers 
for the past year. (Consent Calendar 4-25-94) 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer/Collector to use all means in the 
collection of taxes as the Treasurer/Collector might if elected to that office. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to authorize the Treasurer/Collector to use all 
means in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer. 
(Consent Calendar 4-25-94) 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named sums as Perpetual 
Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest thereof as may be 
necessary for said care, viz: 



John W. & Dorothy G. Ireland 


$350 


Donato & Janice Cardarelli 


1,400 


Janet L. Maloney 


700 


Samuel & Valerie Nejame, Jr. 


1,400 


Harry S. & Lydia Santangelo 


350 


Joan M. & Alfred J. Ouellette 


1,400 


Alice J.H. Hong 


1,400 


Richard L. & Grace D. McCurry 




& Gail Dahlberg 


700 


Michael & Michelle DiNapoli 


2,100 


Francis N. Alger 


1,400 


Marie S. Fay 


700 


Charles H. & Shirley R. Sullivan 


700 


John L. & Virginia Mezzanotti, Sr. 


800 


Carol Stockman 


700 


TOTAL 


$14,100 


(Consent Calendar) 4-25-94 





VOTE: Voted to accept the following named sums of 

cemetery lots for Perpetual Care Trust Fund in the 
Vine Lake Cemetery. (Consent Calendar 4-25-94) 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the following named 
streets, or parts thereof: 

Brastow Drive from Station 0+00 to 10+95.66 
Marsh Drive from Station 0+00 to 8+73.97 
Newell Drive from Station 0+00 to 4+50 
Plympton Circle from Station 0+00 to 2+25.63 



161 



as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in the several Orders 
of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, titles and easements, including drainage 
easements, as may be necessary to accomplish such purposes, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 4-25-94 (Consent Calendar) 

VOTE: Article 5 was dismissed from the Consent Calendar 

as the bounds were not in place on the Layouts. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
purpose of conducting a Hazardous Waste Collection Day, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 4-25-94 

The Hazardous Waste Collection Day is held in Dover this year, and will be Saturday, June 4 
1994, 9:00-1:00. 

ARTICLE 7. To see what sum of money the town will vote to transfer from the Wetlands 
Protection Fee Fund and appropriate for the use of the Conservation Commission to complete 
project reviews and to issue regulatory decisions within required timeframes, including but not 
limited to the costs of engaging consultant and technical assistance for project reviews and 
administrative and clerical costs associated with processing the application and decision, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 



VOTE: Voted to appropriate the sum of $9,200.00 to the 
Wetlands Protection Fund for the use of the 
Conservation Commission in carrying out its duties 
under the provisions of the Wetlands Protection 
Act. (4-26-94) 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 44, 
Section 53E 1/2 to provide for an Ambulance Revolving Fund to be used for the Ambulance 
Lease Purchase Payment, funds not to exceed $11,158.83, to come from the Ambulance 
Mileage Fee Account and to authorize the Police Chief to expend from said funds, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 



VOTE: Voted that the Town accept the provisions of 

Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
53E 1/2 to provide for an Ambulance Revolving Fund 
to be used for the Ambulance Lease Purchase 
payment, funds not to exceed $1 1,158.83 to come 
from the Ambulance Mileage Fee Account and to 
authorize the Police Chief to expend from said 
funds. (4-25-96) 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 44, 
Section 53E-1/2 to provide for a Fire Alarm Revolving Fund to be used for fire alarm 
maintenance, equipment or supplies, funds not to exceed $5,000 to come from the 

162 



Maintenance Fee Account and to authorize the Fire Chief to expend from said funds, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted that the Town accept the provisions of 

Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
53E-1/2 Officer to provide for a Fire Alarm Revolving Fund 
to be used for fire alarm maintenance, equipment or supplies, 
funds not to exceed $5000 to come from the Maintenance 
from the Maintenance Fee Account and to authorize 
the Fire Chief to expend from said funds. 
(4-26-94) 

ARTICLE 10. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate on the fiscal 1994 
tax levy to be used in conjunction with and in addition to any funds allotted by the 
Commonwealth for the construction, reconstruction and improvement of roads under the 
provisions of Section 34, Chapter 90 of the General Laws, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

VOTE: Voted that the Town be authorized to accept funds 
from the Commonwealth for the construction, 
reconstruction and improvement of roads under the 
provisions of Section 34, Chapter 90 of the 
General Laws. (4-26-94) 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation of the 
following elected officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, Selectmen, Assessors, School Committee, 
Trustees of the Public Library, Park and Recreation Commission, Planning Board, Housing 
Authority, and Trust Fund Commissioners, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 





Present 


Warrant Comm. 


Officer 


Salary 


Recommends 


Moderator 








Housing Authority 








Town Clerk 


13,992 


14,482 


Selectman, Chairman 


900 


900 


Selectmen, Clerk 


900 


900 


Selectman, 3rd Member 


900 


900 


Assessors, Chairman 


900 


900 


Assessors, Clerk 


900 


900 


Assessors, 3rd Member 


900 


900 


School Committee 








Library Trustees 








Planning Board 








Park & Recreation Commission 








Trust Fund Commissioners 









163 



VOTE: Voted to fix the salary and compensation of the listed elected officers as 
set out in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administration Plan by] 
adding a new Section XX. SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY as follows: 

"No employee or official shall exercise responsibilities or authority in such a manner as to make 
a term or condition of employment, submission to unwelcome sexual advances, requests for 
sexual favors, or other verbal or non-verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature. No 
employee or official shall conduct himself or herself with respect to verbal or physical behavior 
of a sexual nature where such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering - 
with an individual's work or performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive 
environment." 

and by deleting I. Ambulance EMT Annual Service Stipend: 
and substituting therefor the following: 

"I. Ambulance EMT Stipend : Each certified Ambulance EMT shall 

be paid $10 per twelve hour shift." or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted that the Town amend the Personal Administration 

Plan by adding a new Section XX. SEXUAL HARASSMENT 
POLICY as printed in the warrant except that the first 
sentence in the policy be deleted and the following sentence 
be inserted: 

"No employee or official shall exercise responsibilites or 
authority in such a manner as to make submission to unwelcome 
sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or other verbal or 
non-verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature a term or a 
condition of employment within the town". 

and by deleting I. Ambulance EMT Annual Service Stipend 
and substituting the following: 

I. Ambulance EMT Stipend: Each certified Ambulance EMT 
shall be paid $10 per twelve hour shift. (4-25-94) 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administration Plan, 
effective July 1, 1994, to read as follows: 

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 

Police Department (Weekly) 

Police Sergeant 615.99 640.79 671.85 698.76 

Police Officer 471.91 507.98 546.50 582.79 606.11 

Sr. Police Disp. 423.62 445.09 470.27 493.82 521.88 

Police Dispatcher 381.51 402.14 423.62 445.09 470.27 

164 



Specialist Range 362.00 (Annual Stipend) 2,070.00 



Animal Control 433.42 
Officer/Inspector 

Asst Animal Control 
Officer/Inspector 
(Annual Rate) 1242 



442.08 451.81 461.76 472.36 



1449 1656 1863 2070 



Police Officers designated as Detective, Photographer/Fingerprinter, or Prosecutor by the 
Police Chief shall receive additional compensation annually at a rate to be determined by the 
Police Chief within the above Specialist Range. In the absence of a police sergeant being on 
duty, the senior officer-in charge of any shift be paid 20% of the difference between the police 
officer's salary and the police sergeant's salary.. 

G. Police Officers: For all regularly scheduled shifts starting after 3:00 P.M. and finishing 
prior to 8:00 A.M., a night shift differential of $5.00 per shift will be paid, said sum to be paid 
annually during the month of June. 



MANAGERIAL POSITIONS 


Minimum 


Midpoint 


Maximum 


Town Administrator 


50,048 


62,561 


75,073 


Police Chief 


45,044 


55,054 


65,063 


Supt. of Public Works 


41,290 


51,300 


61,309 


Fire Chief 


39,414 


48,797 


58,181 


Treasurer/Collector 


39,414 


48,797 


58,181 


Library Director 


39,414 


48,797 


58,181 


Administrative Assistant 


30,028 


36,286 


42,542 


Town Accountant 


35,190 


44,505 


53,820 


Other Salaried Positions: 








Cemetery Supervisor 


27,804 


33,598 


39,390 


Detached Social Worker 


24,177 


27,207 


30,238 


Children's Librarian 


24,177 


27,207 


30,238 



HOURLY PAID POSITIONS 



GR. 


MIN. 


STEP 2 


STEP 3 


STEP A 


STEP 5 STEP 6 STEP 7 MAX. 


1 


6.38 


6.56 


6.76 


6.97 


7.17 


7.39 


7.61 


7.82 


2 


6.69 


6.88 


7.09 


7.31 


7.52 


7.75 


7.98 


8.20 


3 


7.04 


7.25 


7.46 


7.69 


7.92 


8.16 


8.39 


8.66 


4 


7.40 


7.62 


7.86 


8.08 


8.33 


8.58 


8.84 


9.11 


5 


7.82 


8.06 


8.30 


8.55 


8.81 


9.07 


9.35 


9.56 


6 


8.20 


8.45 


8.69 


8.95 


9.22 


9.50 


9.79 


10.08 


7 


8.66 


8.92 


9.19 


9.47 


9.75 


10.04 


10.34 


10.62 


8 


9.11 


9.38 


9.67 


9.96 


10.25 


10.56 


10.88 


11.16 


9 


9.56 


9.85 


10.14 


10.45 


10.76 


11.08 


11.42 


11.79 


10 


10.08 


10.38 


10.69 


11.01 


11.34 


11.69 


12.04 


12.38 


11 


10.62 


10.94 


11.26 


11.60 


11.95 


12.31 


12.68 


13.08 


12 


11.16 


11.49 


11.84 


12.19 


12.55 


12.94 


13.32 


13.72 



165 



13 


11.79 


12.14 


12.50 


12.89 


13.27 


13.66 


14.08 


14.45 


14 


12.38 


12.75 


13.13 


13.53 


13.93 


14.34 


14.78 


15.21 


15 


13.08 


13.48 


13.88 


14.29 


14.73 


15.16 


15.62 


16.02 


16 


13.72 


14.14 


14.56 


15.00 


15.44 


15.91 


16.38 


16.85 


17 


14.45 


14.88 


15.33 


15.78 


16.26 


16.75 


17.25 


17.71 


18 


15.21 


15.67 


16.15 


16.62 


17.13 


17.64 


18.16 


18.61 



Minimum wage $4.25 per hour. Lower rates as authorized by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts may also be paid. 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 


Grade 1 


Grade 1 1 


Swimming Instructor 


LightEquipmentOperator 


Lifeguard Instructor 


Municipal Buildings Custodian 


$1,529. minimum per season 


Administrative Secretary 


Lifeguard 


Reference Librarian 


$1,273. minimum per season 




Playground Counselor 


Grade 12 




Park & Recreation Administrtor 


Grade 2 


Wastewater Treatment Plant 


Intern/Trainee 


Operator 




Heavy Equipment Operator 




Water Technician 


Grade 3 


Groundskeeper 


Laborer 






Grade 13 


Grade 4 


Equipment Operator Repairman 


Library 


Finance/Data Proc. Supervisor 


Clerk Typist 


Senior Adminstrative Secretary 


Mini-bus Driver 




(Council on Aging) 


Grade 14 




Senior Groundskeeper 




Tree Warden/Insect Pest Cont. 


Grade 5 


Senior Heavy Equipment Oper. 


Skilled Laborer 


Senior Water Technician 


Executive Director, 


Senior Waste Water Treatment 


(Council on Aging) 


Operator 


Grade 6 


Grade 15 


Senior Library Assistant 


Asst. Wastewater Treatment 


Secretary 


Operator-in-Charge 




Senior Equipment Operator 


Grade 7 


Repairman 


Collector/Bookkeeper/Secretary 




Police Matron 


Grade 16 


Traffic Supervisor 


Presently no jobs 


Grade 8 


Grade 17 


Presently no jobs 


Street/Water/Sewer Foreman 



Wastewater Treatment Plant 



166 



Grade 9 Operator-in-Charge 

Senior Secretary 

Truck Driver 

Special Police Officer Grade 18 

Permanent Intermittent Senior Wastewater Treatment 

Call Firefighters Operator-In-Charge 

Senior Foreman 
Grade 10 
Conservation Agent 

SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITONS 
PART TIME/TEMPORARY 

Annually 
Veteran's Agent 4,501 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 1,532 

Registrar, Clerk 871 

Registrar 362 

Waterfront Director 3,548 to 4,63 1 

Weekly 
Assistant Waterfront Director $220 to 303 

Police Intern 270 to 356 

Hourly 
Tree Climber $7.76 to 12.54 

Ambulance E.M.T. 14.48 



FIRE 


Annuallv 


Deputy Chief 


$1,887 


Captain 


648 


Lieutenant 


480 


Clerk 


480 


Fire Alarm Superintendent 


480 


INSPECTORS 


$17.94 per inspection 




Annual Minimym 


Inspector of Buildings 


$3,471 


Local Inspector of Buildings 


465 


Gas Inspector 


956 


Assistant Gas Inspector 


175 


Plumbing Inspector 


2,835 


Assistant Plumbing Inspector 


650 


Wiring Inspector 


1,578 


Assistant Wiring Inspector 


465 


Zoning Enforcing Officer 


17.94 per inspection 


Health Agent 


17.94 per inspection 


Street Inspector 


9.43 per hour 


or do or act anything in relation thereto. 




(Personnel Board) 





167 



VOTE: Voted that the Personnel Administration Plan, 
Classification of Positions and Pay Schedules be 
amended, effective July 1, 1994 to read as set out 
in the warrant, except that the Police Department 
five step plan be deleted and the following eight 
step plan be substituted: 4-25-94 

Minimum Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Maximum 
Police Department (Weekly) 

Police Sergeant 603.94 616.02 628.33 640.90 653. .71 666.78 680.11 697.02 
Police Officer 474.19 488.41 503.07 518.16 544.06 560.39 577.17 606.11 
Sr. Police Disp. 424.80 437.60 450.40 464.00 478.00 492.40 507.20 523.00 
Police Dispatcher 382,40 394,00 405.60 418.00 430.40 443.20 456.80 471.60 
Minimum Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Maximum 
Specialist Range 362.00 (Annual Stipend) 2070.00 

Animal Control 433.42 438.89 444.36 449.83 455.30 460.77 466.24 472.36 
Officer/Inspector 

Asst. Animal Control 
Office/Inspector 
(Annual Rate)1242.00 1357.00 1472.00 1587.00 1702.00 1817.00 1932.00 2070.00 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or transfer from available funds 
sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any other Town Officer, Board, Commission 
and Committee to defray operating expenses of the Town for the fiscal year commencing July 
1, 1994, or such other sums as the Town may determine as required by General Laws, Chapter 
41, Section 108, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

4-26-94 

VOTE: Voted that the Town Appropriate the sum of $18,199,748 
to defray the operating expenses of the Town for the fiscal 
year commencing July 1, 1994 and to meet said appropriation 
$17.044.448. be raised on the tax levy, $666,300 be raised from 
water revenues of the Water Enterprise Fund and $489,000 
be raised from sewer revenues of the sewer enterprise fund. 



ARTICLE 15. To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate on the Fiscal 1994 tax levy 
and/or transfer from available funds for Capital Expenditures including the following: 

DEPARTMENT PROJECT TITLE 

PLANNING BOARD GIS/CADD MAPPING 

PARK & RECREATION REPLACE PFAFF WINDOWS 

PFAFF ELECTRICAL WORK 
REPLACE BAKER'S POND FENCE 

TOWN HALL REPLACE COPIER 



168 



FIRE 



FIRE APPARATUS-FIRE PUMPER 
BREATHING APPARATUS 
LARGE DIAMETER HOSE 
FIRE ALARM TRUCK 



ASSESSORS 
CEMETERY 



REVALUATION 

CONTINUATION OF EXPANSION ON 
BRIDGE STREET SIDE 



HIGHWAY 



REPLACE 1975 FLINK SANDER 
REPLACE 2- 11' PLOWS 
PLEASANT ST DRAINAGE PROJECT 
MAIN ST. CURBING & WHEELCHAIR 

RAMPS 
CURVE STREET SIDEWALK 
REPLACE NEBO, FOUNDRY & PHILIP 
STREET BRIDGES 
RESURFACE SUBDIVISIONS 
CAUSEWAY ST. FLOOD PLAIN STUDY 
INSTALL LANDFILL CLOSURE 
REPLACE BACKHOE 
ONE TON TRUCK REPLACEMENT 
3/4 TON TRUCK REPLACEMENT 
CLEAN MEETING HOUSE POND/REPAIR 
RETAINING WALLS 
REPLACE GROUNDS TRUCK 



POLICE 



SCHOOL 



REPLACE POLICE CRUISER 
COMPUTER 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE SPACE 
EQUIPMENT FOR AMBULANCE 

SPACE NEEDS AT ELEMENTARY LEVEL 
REMOVE 2 UNDERGROUND OIL TANKS 
FROM DALE AND MIDDLE SCHOOLS 
INSTALL ENERGY MANAGEMENT 
SYSTEMS @ DALE, MEMORIAL, 
WHEELOCK & MIDDLE 
INSTALL STAND ALONE GAS-FIRED 
DHW HEATERS AT WHEELOCK, 
DALE, MIDDLE 



INSTALL GAS-FIRED DISHWASHER 

BOOSTER IN KITCHENS AT WHEELOCK, 

DALE & MIDDLE 

UPGRADE FIRE ALARM SYSTEM AT 

MIDDLE, DALE & WHEELOCK 

ROOF REPAIRS ON MIDDLE 

ROOF REPAIRS ON WHEELOCK 



169 



LIBRARY RENOVATIONS 

and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the School Committee be further authorized to 
contract with and otherwise treat with any federal and state agencies for reimbursement of the 
cost of any capital expenditure; and that the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee 
respectively be authorized to trade or sell toward part of the purchase price the following: 

Trade or Sell: 



DEPARTMENT 
HIGHWAY 



POLICE 
TOWN HALL 



TRADE-IN OR SELL 

1975 FLINK SANDER 

1986JCBBACKHOE 

1989 CHEVROLET 1 TON 

1984 CHEVROLET 3/4 TON 

1989 GMC1 TON 

1991 CROWN VICTORIA 

SAVIN COPIER 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Capital Budget Committee) 

VOTE: Voted that the following sums be appropriated for 
capital expenditures and to meet this appropriation 
$367,000 be raised on the 1995 tax levy, $10,000 
from Federal Aid, $140,000 from State Aid, $25,000 
from Sale of Lots Fund, and $23,200 from trade-ins 
or sale of vehicles or equipment. 4-25-94 



PROJECT TITLE 



Pfaff Electrical Work 


$8,500 


Fire Pumper-Lease Payment 


48,500 


Breathing Apparatus 


18,000 


4" Fire Hose 


9,200 


Expansion 


25,000 


Replace 1975 Flink Sander 


6,000 


Curve St. Sidewalks 


20,000 


Replace Nebo, Foundry & 




Philip St. Bridges 


150,000 


Resurface Subdivisions 


30,000 


Install Landfill Closure 


10,000 


Replace Backhoe 


75,000 


One Ton Truck Replacement 


22,000 


3/4 Ton Truck Replacement 


20,000 


Meeting House Pond Clean/Rep. 


6,000 


Replace Police Cruiser 


18,500 


Computer 


24,000 


Equipment for Ambulance 


8,000 


Schools Space Needs Study 


25,000 



170 



Removal of Underground Tanks 30,000 

Energy Management Systems 25,000 
Upgrade Fire Alarm System 

@ Wheelock, Dale & Middle 6.500 

TOTAL $565,200 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $5,000, said sum to be transferred 
from the FY94 Chapter 70 School Aid to be allocated to pupil personnel services: 

2000 Instructional Services 

100 Personnel $5,000 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $5,000 be transferred from 
the Fiscal Year 1994 Chapter 70 School Aid to the 
200 Instructional Services 100 Personnel account. 
4-26-94 

ARTICLE 17. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to transfer from the 
Stabilization Fund and appropriate for the purpose of performing the Town's triennial property 
revaluation for Fiscal 1995, or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of 

Assessors) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $60,000 be transferred from 
the Stabilization Fund and appropriated it for the 
purpose of performing the Town's triennial 
property revaluation for Fiscal 1995. 4-26-94 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of 
conducting a Sewer Master Plan Update, said funds to be transferred from the unexpended 
balance of Article 26 of the 1988 Annual Town Meeting, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Water and Sewer Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Town appropriate $40,000 
for the purpose of conducting a Sewer Master Plan 
Update, said sum to be transferred from the unexpended balance 
of Article 26 of the 1988 AnnualTown Meeting. 4-26-94 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to acquire by eminent 
domain, or otherwise, drainage easements of 401 square feet more or less on land belonging 
to the Trustees of Reservations as shown on Plan of Drainage Easement on Main Street dated 
November 15, 1993 prepared by the Norfolk County Engineering Department, which is on file 
with the Town Clerk; and to see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate for the purposes 
of this article, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



171 



VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Town acquire by eminent 
domain, gift or purchase, drainage easements of 401 
square feet more or less on land belonging to the 
Trustees of Reservations as shown on a Plan of 
Drainage Easement on Main Street dated November 15. 
1993 prepared by the Norfolk County Engineering 
Department, which is on file with the Town Clerk; 
and for this purpose the sum of one dollar ($1) is 
appropriated, said sum to be raised on the tax 
levy. 4-25-94 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for remodeling, 
reconstructing and constructing additions to the Medfield Library, including equipment and 
related site improvements; to determine whether this appropriation shall be raised by borrowing 
or otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

(Library Board of Trustees) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town appropriate fifty thousand 
dollars (550,000) for the purpose of preparing 
final plans and specifications for remodeling, 
reconstructing and constructing additions to the 
Medfield Library, including equipment and related 
site improvements, said sum to be raised on the tax 
levy. 4-25-94 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Section 6.2 by 
removing the "% Non Wetlands/Flood Plain*" column from the table and placing an * next to 
the word "Area" in the column headings and then deleting, at the bottom of the page, the 
sentence following * and substituting in its place the following: "Minimum lot area shall include 
only contiguous land which is not in wetlands (see 2.1.80); which is not in the Watershed 
and/or Flood Plain District; and which does not have a slope greater than 20% for a distance of 
50 feet in its natural and unaltered state." 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town amend the zoning Bylaw, Section 
6.2 by removing the "% Non Wetland/Flood Plain*" 
column from the table and placing an * next to the 
word "Area" in the column headings and then delete, 
at the bottom of the page, the sentence following * 
and substitute in its place the following: 
"Minimum lot area shall include only contiguous 
land which is not in wetlands (see 2.1.80); which 
is not in the Watershed and/or Flood Plain 
District; and which does not have a slope greater 
than 20% for a distance of 50 feet in its natural 
and unaltered state", providing that if any portion 
of this amendment is ruled invalid by the Attorney 

172 



General of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or by 
any court of competent jurisdiction, the decision 
of the Attorney General or of such court shall not 
affect or impair any of the remaining provisions. 
4-25-94 

2/3 vote YES 294 

NO 81 UNANIMOUS 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Section 5.4.4.2 by 
deleting the present wording in the "use" column and substituting therefor the following: 

"Establishments primarily selling food and drink for home 
preparation and consumption or for on premises 
consumption (neither drive-throughs nor takeout windows 
are permitted in connection with this use) 

and by changing the "PB" in the "B" and "B-I" columns to "SP," 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously for the Town to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 5.4.4.2 by deleting the present 
wording in the "use" column and substituting 
therefor the following: 

"Establishments primarily selling food and drink 
for home preparation and consumption or for on 
premises consumption (neither drive-throughs nor 
take-out windows are permitted in connection with 
this use.)" and by changing the "PB" in the "B" and 
"B-F columns to "SP". 4-26-94 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Section 12.8. l.d by 
deleting the phrase "..such that their tops are six feet below.." and inserting in its place the 
phrase "..such that their tops are three feet below..," or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously for the Town to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 12.8. l.d by deleting the Phrase 
M ..such that their tops are six feet below.." and 
inserting in its place the phrase "..such that 
their tops are four feet below.." 4-26-94 

YES 242 
NO 68 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw by deleting Section 
6.2.1 1 as it now reads and substituting therefor the following: 

173 



"In any "R" District permitted accessory buildings and 
structures shall conform to the following provisions: 
They shall not occupy more than 40 percent of the 
required rear yard; they shall be not less than 60 feet 
from any street lot line, except on a corner lot, on 
which they shall be set back at least the same distance 
as the front yard setback for the adjacent lot; and they 
shall not be less than six feet from any lot line other 
than a street lot line." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: The Main motion on Article 24 failed, plus the 

whole Article failed. The (and structures) be 
deleted from the Zoning Bylaw 6.2. 11. 
4-25-94 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Section 6.3 TABLE 
OF HEIGHT AND BULK REGULATIONS by changing in the R-S District the Maximum 
Height (ft.) to 30 and the Permitted Height (Stories) to 2, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Town amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 6.3 TABLE OF HEIGHT AND BULK 
REGULATIONS by changing in the R-S District the 
Maximum Height (ft) to 30, and the Permitted Height 
Stories to 2 1/2. 

4-26-94 

YES 128 
NO 88 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Medfield Bylaw ARTICLE 
XIV. HISTORIC DISTRICTS by adding to Section 3. Historic District Boundaries as 
follows: 

"Medfield State Hospital Section of the John Metcalf 
Historic District. 

The boundaries are hereby established as shown on the 
map, filed with the Medfield Planning Board and the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission on January 18, 1994, 
which accompanies and is hereby declared to be part of 
the Bylaw." 

and by adding to SECTION 5. DEFINITIONS as follows: 

174 



"and also shall mean the Medfield State Hospital Section 
of the John Metcalf Historic District." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Medfield Historical Commission) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Town amend the Town of 

Medfield Bylaw ARTICLE XIV. HISTORIC DISTRICTS as 
set out in the Warrant, except that after the first 
semicolonC) 

"Medfield State Hospital Section of the John 
Metcalf Historic District be changed to:. 

"Hospital Farm Historic District, 

Chat after SECTION 5. (F) be added, 

lind that after the second semicolon(:) 

"and also shall mean the Medfield State Hospital 
Section of the John Metcalf Historic Distric" 

be changed to: 

"and also shall mean the Hospital Farm Historic 
District." 4-25-94 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Medfield Bylaws, 
ARTICLE XVI - DEMOLITION by deleting the present title and substitute the following: 

"ARTICLE XVI - DEMOLITION (HISTORIC and ARCHEOLOGIC)" 

ind to delete the paragraph under Section 1. - Intent and Purpose and insert the following: 

"This bylaw is adopted for the purpose of protecting the 

archeologic, historic, and aesthetic resources of the 

Town of Medfield by surveying, preserving, rehabilitating, researching, or restoring 

whenever possible, buildings, structures, or archeological sites 

which constitute or reflect distinctive features of the 

architectural, cultural, or historic resources of the 

Town, thereby promoting the public welfare and 

preserving the cultural heritage of Medfield." and to 

amend Section 2. Definitions by adding the following: 

"2.7 ArcheologicalProtectionDistrict: The 
Archeological Protection District is composed of shaded 
and labeled areas shown on the included map entitled 
"Archeological Protection District, Town of Medfield, 
Massachusetts." 

175 



and to amend Section 3. Regulated Buildings. Structures and Sites by adding the following: 

"3.4 Archeological sites located within the boundaries of 
the Archeological Protection District. 

and to change Section 4 as follows: 

" Section 4. Procedure - Demolition Permits" 

and by renumbering and amending the present Section 5 as Section 6 as follows: 

" Section 6. Enforcement. Remedies and Appeals " 

and by adding: 

"6.3 Appeals. Decisions made by the Commission may be 
appealed to the Selectmen within twenty-one (21) days." 

and by adding a new Section 5 as follows: 

" Section 5. Procedure - Building Permits. Earth Removal 
Permits. Subdivision Permits, and Open Space Residential 
Permits 

5.1 Upon receipt of an application for a building permit, 

an earth removal permit, a subdivision permit, or an open 
space residential zoning permit for property located 
within the Archeological Protection District, the permit 
granting authority shall direct the applicant also to 
supply the Commission with a copy of the application for 
review and recommendation. Failure of the Commission to 
respond within thirty (30) days of its receipt of the 
application shall be deemed to signify its lack of 
opposition to the project. 

5.2 If the Commission finds that the proposed 
construction poses a serious threat to the town's 
archeological resources, it can recommend that the permit 
granting authority require that the applicant make 
adequate provision for the safeguarding of said 
archeological resources. Such adequate provisions might 
include, but are not limited to, surveys and resource 
preservation plans completed in cooperation with the 
Commission and/or the state archeologist. 

and to renumber the present Section 6 as Section 7. Severability." 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Historical Commission) 



176 



VOTE: Voted that the Town amend the Town of Medfield 

Bylaws, ARTICLE XVI - DEMOLITION as set out in the 

warrant. 4-26-94 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Medfield Bylaws by adding 
to ARTICLE HI. TOWN OFFICERS, Section 13 as follows: 

"(a) No person who has served on a town board may serve 
in a managerial position under that board until two 
years after vacating the board. 

(b) No town board may appoint as an immediate and direct 
subordinate a person whose immediate family member has 
served on that board within the past 12 months. 

(c) No town official may immediately and directly 
supervise an immediate family member. 

(d) Any current office holder who might be adversely 
affected by subsections (a) through (c) should be 
allowed to continue working. " 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 
(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town of Medfield Bylaws be amended 

by adding to ARTICLE HI. TOWN OFFICERS, Section 13 
as set out in the warrant, except that in 
subsection (d) the word "should" be changed to the 
word "shall". 4-26-94 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to add to the Town of Medfield Bylaw a new 
ARTICLE XVII - NOISE CONTROL as follows: 

"ARTICLE XVn - NOISE CONTROL 

1.0 Scope 

This Bylaw shall apply to the control of sound originating within the limits of the Town of 
Medfield. 

2.0 Fixed Plant Equipment 

No person owning, leasing or controlling the operation of any source of noise of the types 
listed below shall willfully, negligently or through failure to provide necessary equipment, 
maintenance or facilities or to take necessary precautions, permit the establishment or 
continuation of a condition of NOISE POLLUTION. 

The following sources, and any other similar noise producing device not specified here, shall be 
considered as sources of NOISE POLLUTION: Air conditioners, pumps, fans, furnaces, 

177 



compressors, engines and similar fixed plant equipment. Noise measurements shall be made at 
the boundary of the property upon which the offending source is located or at the boundary of 
the complainant. 

3 . Construction Equipment 

The following devices shall be prohibited from use during the hours of 7 (seven) P.M. to 7 
(seven) A.M. every day of the year. 

(a) All devices employed in CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION. 

4.0 Definitions 

NOISE POLLUTION: If a noise source increases NOISE LEVELS lOdb or more above the 
background NOISE LEVEL, it shall be judged that a condition of NOISE POLLUTION 
exists. However, if the NOISE LEVEL is judged by ear to be a TONAL SOUND, an increase 
of 5 db above the background NOISE LEVEL is sufficient to cause NOISE POLLUTION. 

CONSTRUCTION and DEMOLITION: Any site preparation, assembly, erection, substantial 
repair, alteration, destruction or similar action for public or private rights of way, structures, 
utilities or similar properties. Devices employed in CONSTRUCTION or DEMOLITION shall 
not be moved to or from the site of said CONSTRUCTION or DEMOLITION nor shall they 
be started or warmed up between the hours of seven (7) P.M. and seven (7) A.M. 

TONAL SOUND: Any sound that is judged by a listener to have the characteristics of a pure 
tone, whine, hum or buzz. 

NOISE LEVEL: All measurements shall be made with a sound level meter as classified under 
ANSI standards. 

5.0 Exemptions: The Board of Selectmen, or designee, may grant a special permit for any 
activity, otherwise forbidden by the provisions of this Bylaw. A person seeking such a permit 
must submit a written application to the Board of Selectmen, or designee, on the appropriate 
form which shall be available at the office of the Board of Selectmen. 

There shall be a ten dollar ($10) processing fee for all such permit applications. 

6.0 Penalties: (a) Any person who violates any provision of this Bylaw shall be assessed a fine 
of fifty dollars ($50) if said violation is not corrected within ten (10) days of being directed to 
do so. 

(b) Each day beyond the tenth day that violation continues shall be considered to be a separate 
violation. 

(c) This bylaw shall be enforced by Chapter 40, Section 2 ID of Massachusetts General Laws 
and enforcing officers shall be Medfield Police Officers or Zoning Enforcing Officer." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



178 



VOTE: Article 29 NOISE CONTROL failed to pass. 
4-25-94 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Medfield Bylaws 
ARTICLE IV. POLICE REGULATIONS by deleting SECTION 26. Transient Persons and 
substituting the following: 

"SECTION 26. Solicitation 

A. License Required . It shall be unlawful for any solicitor or canvasser as defined in this 
bylaw to engage in such business within the Town without first obtaining a license therefore in 
compliance with the provisions of this bylaw. The provisions of this bylaw shall not apply to 
any person exempted under Chapter 101 of the General Laws, or to any person exempted by 
another General Law, nor shall this bylaw be construed to prevent route salesmen or other 
persons having established customers to whom they make periodic deliveries from calling upon 
such customers or from making calls upon prospective customers to solicit an order for future 
periodic route deliveries. 

B. Definition . A solicitor or canvasser is defined as any person who, for himself, or for 
another person, firm or corporation travels by foot, automobile or any other type of 
conveyance from place to place, from house to house, or from street to street, taking or 
attempting to lease or take orders for retail sale of goods, wares, merchandise or services, 
including without limiting, the selling, distributing, exposing for sale or soliciting orders for 
magazines, books, periodicals or other articles of a commercial nature, the contracting of all 
home improvements, or for services to be performed in the future whether or not such 
individual has, carries or exposes for retail sale a sample of the subject of such sale or whether 
he is collecting advance payment on such retail sales. 

C. Application . Applicants for a license shall file with the Board of Selectmen or its designee 
a form issued by the Board of Selectmen or its designee, a written application signed under the 
penalties of perjury containing the following information: 

Name of applicant and local and permanent home address of applicant, height, weight, 
eye and hair color, social security number, the length of time for which the right to do business 
is desired, a brief description of the nature of the business and the goods to be sold, the name 
and home office address of the applicant's employer, or if self-employed, it shall so state, and if 
operating a motor vehicle the year, make, model, motor number, registration number, state of 
registration, vehicle's owner and address. 

At the time of filing the application, each applicant shall pay a fee often dollars ($10.) 

D. Investigation and Issuance . 

Upon receipt of the application, the Chief of Police shall investigate the applicant's 
reputation as to morals and integrity. 

After an investigation of the applicant's morals and integrity, the Board of Selectmen 
shall hold a public hearing on said application within fourteen days or at its next meeting and 
shall reach a decision and shall endorse on such application its approval or disapproval. If 
denied, an applicant may petition for reconsideration within 7 days. 

179 



Such license when issued shall contain the signature of the Board of Selectmen or its 
designee and shall show the name, address, and photograph of said licensee, the date of 
issuance and the length of time the same shall be operative, as well as the license number. The 
Police Department shall keep a record of all licenses issued for a period of six (6) years. 
Solicitors and canvassers when engaged in the business of soliciting or canvassing are required 
to display an identifying badge issued by the Police Department, by wearing said badge on an 
outer garment. Each licensee is required to possess an individual license. 

E. Duty of Police to Enforce - Transfer . The police officers of the Town shall enforce this 
bylaw. No license shall be transferred. 

F. Revocation of License . The Chief of Police is hereby vested with the jurisdiction over the 
revoking of licenses. Any person agrieved by such revocation may appeal to the Board of 
Selectmen within 7 business days, and a hearing will be scheduled for one of the next two 
regularly scheduled meetings of the Board of Selectmen. 

G. Expiration of License . Each license issued under the provisions of this bylaw shall continue 
in force from the date of its issue to the expiration date noted on license. 

H. Renewal of License . A license issued under the provisions of this bylaw may be renewed 
by the Chief of Police. An applicant requesting a renewal of a license must apply in person for 
such license renewal, and provide such information as is required to obtain an initial license. 

I. Misrepresentation . No solicitor or canvasser, licensed or exempted from license, may 
misrepresent, in any manner, the buyer's right to cancel as stipulated by Chapters 93, 93 A and 
255D of the General Laws. 

No solicitor or canvasser, licensed or exempted from license, may use any plan, scheme 
or ruse which misrepresents the true status or mission of the person making the call in order to 
gain admission to a prospective buyer's home, office, or other establishment with the purpose 
of making a sale of consumer goods or services. 

J. Trespassing. It shall be unlawful for any canvasser or solicitor to enter the premises of a 
resident or business who has displayed a "no trespassing" or "no soliciting" sign or poster. 
Further, it shall be unlawful for canvassers or solicitors to ignore a resident or business person's 
no solicitation directive or remain on private property after its owner has indicated that the 
canvasser or solicitor is not welcome. 

K. Penalty. Any person violating any provisions of this bylaw shall, upon conviction thereof, 
be punished by a fine of fifty dollars ($50) for each and every offense." 

or do or or act anything in relation thereto 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Town of Medfield Bylaws 

ARTICLE IV. POLICE REGULATIONS be amended by 
deleting SECTION 26. Transient Persons and 
substituting a new SECTION 26. Solicitation as set 
out in the warrant. 4-26-94 

180 



ARTICLE 3 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Medfield Bylaws by adding 
to ARTICLE IV, POLICE REGULATIONS, a new SECTION 34. Violation of Water Ban or 
Water Conservation Measures as follows: 

"SECTION 34. Violation of Water Ban or Water Conservation 
Measures. 

"Violation of any water ban or water conservation measure which comes into effect in the 
Town of Medfield, whether under authority of M.G.L. Chapter 21G, Section 15 et seq., or any 
other authority, may be enforced in the manner provided in M.G. L. c. 40, Section 2 ID. The 
enforcing persons within the Town of Medfield for purpose of serving a ticket or summons 
upon any individual(s), company or other entity found to be in violation of any water ban or 
water conservation measure are: (1) any officer of the Medfield Police Department; or (2) 
Superintendent of Public Works or designee; or (3) any member of the Water and Sewer 
Department. The fine for violation of any water ban or water conservation measure shall be: 

Fine - $ 25 - First offense 
$ 50 - Second offense 
$100 - Third and subsequent offenses" 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town of Medfield Bylaws be amended 

by adding to ARTICLE IV, POLICE REGULATIONS a new 
SECTION 34. Violation of Water Ban or Water 
Conservation Measures as set out in the Warrant, 
except that in the last sentence before the fine 
schedule the words "in any one calendar year" be 
inserted after the word "measure". 4-25-94 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to acquire for open 
space preservation, protection of water resources and conservation purposes by purchase 
and/or gift a parcel of land between High Street and the railroad tracks shown as Parcel 31 on 
the Town of Medfield Assessors' Map 29, containing 21.3 acres more or less, and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to receive money from the state and/or federal government, and to 
authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow under the 
provisions of Chapter 44, Section 7 of the Massachusetts General Laws for the purposes of 
this article, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the sum of $500,000 be 
appropriated to acquire by purchase for 
conservation purposes a parcel of land between High 
Street and the railroad tracks shown as parcel 3 1 
on the Town of Medfield Assessor's Map 29, 
containing 21.3 acres more or less; that to meet 
this appropriation the Treasurer/Collector, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, be authorized to 

181 



borrow under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 
8C of the Massachusetts General Laws; and that the 
Board of Selectmen be authorized to apply for and 
receive monies from the state and/or federal 
government for this purpose. 4-26-94 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Medfield Bylaw IV. 
POLICE REGULATIONS, first paragraph, by deleting the words "Two Hundred Dollars 
($200)" and inserting the words "Three Hundred Dollars ($300)" in its place, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town of Medfield Bylaw IV. POLICE 

REGULATIONS, first paragraph be amended by deleting 
the words "Two Hundred Dollars ($200)" and 
inserting the words "Three Hundred Dollars ($300)" 
in its place. 4-26-94 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Medfield Bylaw by adding 
a new ARTICLE XVH. BYLAW ENFORCEMENT as follows: 

"ARTICLE XVII. BYLAW ENFORCEMENT 

SECTION A. Any bylaw of the Town of Medfield, or regulation of its departments, boards, 
commissions and committees, the violation of which is subject to a specific penalty, may, in the 
discretion of the Town Official who is the appropriate enforcing person, be enforced in the 
method provided in Section 2 ID of Chapter 40 of the Massachusetts General Laws "Non- 
Criminal Disposition of Certain Violations." "Enforcing Person" as used in this bylaw shall 
mean the Animal Control Officer, Conservation Officer, Board of Health Agent, Inspector of 
Buildings, any Police Officer, Fire Chief, Plumbing and Gas Inspector, Electrical Inspector, and 
such other officials as the Board of Selectmen may from time to time designate, each with 
respect to violation of bylaws and regulations within their respective jurisdictions. If more than 
one official has jurisdiction in a given case, any such official may be an enforcing person with 
respect thereto." 

SECTION B. Violation of any of the following bylaw sections of the Bylaws of the Town of 
Medfield may be enforced in the manner provided in M.G.L. Chapter 40, Section 2 ID; for the 
purpose of this section, the specific penalty which is to apply for violation of each such section 
shall be as listed below, and the municipal officers or employees whose titles are listed under 
each section shall be deemed to be enforcing officers for each such section. 

"ARTICLE IV -POLICE REGULATIONS 

SECTION 3 Leaving objects in public way 
Fine - $50 
(Medfield Police Officers) 

SECTION 4 Carrying improper items through Town 
Fine - $50 
(Medfield Police Officers or Board of 

182 



Health Enforcement Officer) 

SECTION 5 Leaving improper waste within Town 
Fine - $50 

(Medfield Police Officers or Board of 
Health Enforcement Officer) 

SECTION 6 Coasting in public way 
Fine - $30 
(Medfield Police Officers) 

SECTION 7 Animal noise or nuisance 
Fine - $35 - First offense 
50 - Second offense 
100 - Third and subsequent offenses 
(Medfield Animal Control Officer or 
Medfield Police Officers) 



SECTION 8 Public performance or meeting without permit 
Fine - $30 
(Medfield Police Officers) 

SECTION 9 Vehicles upon sidewalks 
Fine - $30 
(Medfield Police Officers) 

SECTION 9a Motorcycles, etc. upon public playing fields 
Fine - $250 
(Medfield Police Officers) 

SECTION 10 Public Loitering (10a) & Public Drinking 
(10b) 

Fine - $200 
(Medfield Police Officers) 

SECTION 1 1 Gun Discharge, etc. 
Fine - $300 
(Medfield Police Department) 

SECTION 12 Junk or pawn shops 
Fine - $200 
(Medfield Police Officers) 

SECTION 13 Snow and ice removal 
Fine -$35 

(Medfield Police Officers or 
Highway Superintendent) 

SECTION 14 No playing in street 

183 



Fine - $20 

(Medfield Police Officers) 

SECTION 15 No nude bathing 
Fine - $25 
(Medfield Police Officers) 

SECTION 17 No pipes or trenches in public ways 
Fine -$100 

(Medfield Police Officers or 
Highway Superintendent) 

SECTION 18 Disorderly Conduct 
Fine -$100 
(Medfield Police Officers) 

SECTION 21 No grafitti, etc. 

Fine - $ 50 - First Offense 
$100 -Second Offense 
$200 • Third and subsequent offenses 
(Medfield Police Officers) 

SECTION 23 Public Drinking 

Fine - $200 Section (a) 
$200 Section (b) 
(Medfield Police Officers) 



SECTION 24 Storing disabled or unregistered motor 
vehicle 

Fine - $ 75 - First offense 
$100 -Second offense 
$150 -Third offense 
$250 - Fourth and subsequent offenses 
(Medfield Police Officers or 
Health Enforcement Officer) 

SECTION 26 Public Solicitation without permit 
Fine - $50 
(Medfield Police Officers) 

ARTICLE VI. SNOW REMOVAL 

Fine - $50 plus cost of towing and storage 
(Medfield Police Officers or 
Highway Superintendent) 

ARTICLE VII. DOG CONTROL 

SECTION 3. Penalty 

184 



Fines for violations of Sec. 1(A) (2) - (6) 
and Section 2 (in any one calandar year.) 

- First offense 
$25 - Second offense 
$30 - Third offense 
$50 - Fourth and subsequent offenses 

Fine for violation of Section 1 (A) (1) 
$25 - in addition to the license fee 
(Medfield Police Officers 
or Animal Control Officer) 

ARTICLE IX. WETLANDS 

SECTION 10. ENFORCEMENT 

Fines - Within one calendar year 
$ 75 - First offense 
$100 - Second offense 
$200 - Third offense 
$300 - Fourth and subsequent offenses 
(Medfield Police Officer or 
Conservation Agent) 

ARTICLE X - HANDICAPPED PARKING 

SECTION 4. Fines - $ 1 5 - First offense 

$25 - Second offense 

$50 - Plus cost of towing and storage 

for third and subsequent offenses 

(Medfield Police Officers) 

ARTICLE XI - UNDERGROUND UTILITY INSTALLATION 

Fine- $50 

(Medfield Police Officers or 
Highway Superintendent)" 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town adopt a new bylaw entitled 

"BYLAW ENFORCEMENT" as set out in the warrant, 
except that the numerical listing of this bylaw be 
changed from "XVH" to "XVIII" and that a committee 
of not more than five members be appointed by the 
Board ofSelectmen to review the Town's Bylaws, said 
committee to report back to the Selectmen before 
December 1, 1994 with recommendations for deletion 
of irrelevant or obsolete bylaws. 4-25-94 

185 



ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 653, Section 
40 of the Acts of the 1989 amending Chapter 59, Section 2A(a) of the Massachusetts General 
Laws, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 
VOTE: Voted that the Town accept the provisions of 
Chapter 653, Section 40 of the Acts of 1989 
amending Chapter 59, Section 2A(a) of the 
Massachusetts General Laws. 4-25-94 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 110, Section 
110 of the 1994 amending Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5, clause 22, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTE: Voted that Article 36 be dismissed. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Water and Sewerage to accept a 
sewerage pumping station, associated structure pipes and utilities and an easement as described 
below: 

(1) a portion of Lot 1 with the buildings thereon as shown on a plan entitled: "THE 
MEADOWS IN MEDFIELD, MASS." scale l"=40'drawn by Cheney Engineering Co., Inc., 
which plan is recorded at Norfolk Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 1005 of 1989 which is 
labelled "PROP. PUMPING STATION," which is a rectangular jog of land extending beyond 
the southerly side of said Lot 1 and more particularly described as follows: 

Beginning in a point on the southerly bound of said Lot 1 
at a distance of about 1 10 feet westerly of the westerly 
side line of Tubreck Drive; then running southerly from a 
distance of about twenty (20) feet; then running westerly 
for a distance of about fifteen (15) feet; then running 
northerly for a distance of about twenty (20) feet; then 
running easterly from a distance of about fifteen (15) 
feet back to the point of beginning. 

(2) the easement as shown on the aforesaid plan from the 
aforesaid easement to Main Street, which is labelled 
"PROP. FORCE MAIN" 

Said easement shall not be accepted until such time as the sewerage pumping station has been 
tested and approved by the Board of Water and Sewerage and its consulting engineer. 

A copy of the easement shall be recorded at the Norfolk County Registry of Deeds at the 
expense of developer, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewer Board) 

VOTE: Voted that Article 37 be dismissed. 4-25-94 



186 



ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will authorize, through the Board of Selectmen and the 
Board of Water and Sewerage, the acceptance of the gravity portion of street sewers 
constructed in the Town way from Station 0+00 in Spring Street at the intersection of Charles 
River Interceptor and Spring Street, through to Station 32+23 as shown on R.F. Merriken 
Associates drawings 76-03 sheets 21, 30 and 32 of 33 being the terminus of the gravity portion 
of the system installed to serve the Southern Acres development near Westview Road and 
South Street, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewer Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town authorize the acceptance of the 
gravity sewers in Spring Street and South Street as 
set out in the warrant. 4-26-94 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to execute 
and grant an easement to the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company over land 
owned by the Town on Bridge Street, the Vine Lake Cemetery. Easement location to be the 
most southwesterly corner of the lot. Said easement is to permit the Company to place and 
maintain two (2) manholes, one with raised hatch, one service cabinet with pad, and all 
necessary conduits, cables, and electrical power feeds within a twenty foot by fifty foot 
easement along Bridge Street, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Town authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to execute and grant an easement to 
the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company 
over land owned by the Town on Bridge Street, the 
Vine Lake Cemetery an easement location to be the 
most southwesterly corner of the lot. Said easment 
is to permit the Company to place and maintain two (2) 
manholes, one with raised hatch, one service 
cabinet with pad, and all necessary conduits, 
cables, and electrical power feeds within a twenty 
foot by fifty foot eqsement along Bridge Street. 
4-25-94 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money not to exceed 
$300,000 for the purpose of installing a sewer pumping station and sewer mains to service 
Juniper Lane; to determine whether this appropriation should be raised by borrowing or 
otherwise, and to authorize the Selectmen and the Water and Sewerage Board to assess sewer 
betterments in accordance with the provisions of the Town of Medfield's Bylaws and the 
General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachustts, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTE: The vote on Article 40 failed, therefore dismissed. 
4-26-94 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to add a new Section #26 to Article 
II-Administration and Finance of the Town of Medfield Bylaws which shall read: "The Town 
Accountant shall prepare, at least as often as semi-annually, a written accounting of revenues, 
expenditures and balances of all "Revolving Funds" that are currently, or shall be, provided for. 

187 



This accounting shall be provided to the Board of Selectmen and the Warrant Committee (with 
a copy and all supporting documentation retained for public inspection) withing sixty (60) days 
after the close of said semi-annual period," or to do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTE: Voted that Article 4 1 be dismissed. 4-26-94 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to establish a School Space Needs Committee to 
be composed of five members to be appointed by the Town Moderator, such committee to be 
composed of one member of the School Committee and four members at large with the School 
Superintendent as an ex-officio member, term to be for the duration of the project, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town establish a School Space Needs 
Committee to be composed of five members appointed 
by the Town Moderator, including one member of the 
School Committee and four members at large with the 
School Superintendent serving as an ex-officio 
member; said committee to report its findings to 
the Moderator and the School Committee on or before 
December 1, 1994 at which time the committee will 
dissolve unless requested to continue by the 
Moderator or School Committee. 4-25-94 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to establish and fund a Department of Pupil 
Transportation, under the supervision of the School Committee. The governance of the 
department will be directed by Chapter 71, Section 68 of the Massachusetts General Laws and 
school policy and public safety laws and regulations with the advice and consent of the 
Superintendent of Schools or his/her designee and the Chief of Police, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 

VOTE: Voted on a Motion to pass Article 43. 

129 in the affirmative, and 180 in the negative. 
The Motion was then dismissed. 4-25-94 



ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Assessors to use a sum 
of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for fiscal 1995, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town authorize the Board of 

Assessors to use $648,3 14 from Free Cash in the 
treasury for the reduction of the Tax Rate for 
Fiscal year 1995. 4-26-94 

Meeting was dissolved at 10:45 P.M. 

188 



Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



July 26, 1994 

Boston, Massachusetts 

The foregoing amendments to the zoning by-laws adopted under articles 21, 22 and 23 of the 
warrant for the Medfield Annual Town Meeting that convened April 25, 1994, are hereby 
approved. 

The foregoing amendments to the historic district by-laws adopted under articles 26 and 27 of 
the warrant for the Medfield Annual Town Meeting that convened April 25, 1994, are hereby 
approved. 

The foregoing amendments to the general by-laws adopted under articles 28, 30, 33 and 34 of 
the warrant for the Medfield Annual Town Meeting that convened April 25, 1994, are hereby 
approved. 

The within historic district map pertaining to article 26 of the warrant for the Medfield Annual 
Town Meeting that convened April 25, 1994, is hereby approved. 



SCOTT HARSHBARGER 
ATTORNEY GENERAL 



Anthony E. Penski 
Assistant Attorney General 



189 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MICHAEL JOSEPH CONNOLLY, SECRETARY 

STATE PRIMARY 

Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said county, greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in elections to meet at the Memorial 
School in said Medfield, On TUESDAY, THE , TWENTIETH DAY OF SEPTEMBER 
1994 from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the candidates of political parties for the 
following offices: 

U.S. SENATOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

GOVERNOR AND LT. GOVERNOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

ATTORNEY GENERAL FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

SECRETARY FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

TREASURER FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

AUDITOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 9th Congressional District 

COUNCILLOR 2nd Councillor District 

SENATOR IN THE GENERAL COURT Norfolk, Bristol & Plymouth District 

REPRESENTATIVE IN THE GENERAL 

COURT Thirteenth Norfolk District 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY Norfolk District 

CLERK OF COURTS Norfolk County 

REGISTER OF DEEDS Norfolk County District 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER Norfolk County 

COUNTY CHARTER COMMISSION Plymouth County (Only) 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and 
place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this ni nth day of September 1994. 

/S/ Ann B. Thompson, Chairman 
/S/ Tidal B. Henry, Clerk 
/S/ John T. Harney, Member 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, 
qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, by posting 
attested copies of said warrant in not less than five public places in the Town of Medfield at 
least seven days before the time of holding the meeting. 

RONALD E. KERR, Constable September 9, 1994 

190 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

STATE PRIMARY 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1994 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 AM with reading of the 
warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters were posted. 

The following workers were assigned: 

Mabelle Maguire, Priscilla Anderson, Anna Murphy, Sadie Carson, Nancy Franke, Emmy 
Mitchell, Joan Bussow, Marshall Chick, Katherine Buchanan, Frances Colella, Dorothea 
Gaughan, Elizabeth Lordan, Elmer Portman, Elton Bassett, Gail Rad, Ralph Parmigian, Eva 
Grover, Jessie Portman, Helen Reinhard, Clifford G. Doucette, Nancy Preston, C.B. Doub. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 787. There are 6,688 registered voters. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as follows: 

DEMOCRATIC BALLOTS PRECINCT 

12 3 4 TOTAL 



U.S. SENATOR, VOTE FOR ONE 

Edward M. Kennedy 
Blanks 

GOVERNOR, VOTE FOR ONE 

George A. Bachrach 
Michael J. Barrett 
Mark Roosevelt 
Blalnks 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, VOTE FOR ONE 
Marc D. Draisen 
Robert K. Massie 
Blanks 

ATTORNEY GENERAL, VOTE FOR ONE 
L. Scott Harshbarger 
Blanks 

SECRETARY OF STATE, VOTE FOR ONE 
William F. Galvin 
Augusto Grace 
Blanks 



141 1 


134 


122 ] 


174 


571 




65 


45 


38 


68 


216 


787 


59 


58 


44 


63 


224 




38 


30 


32 


49 


149 




86 


75 


67 


96 


324 




23 


16 


17 


34 


90 


787 


85 


74 


67 


86 


312 




66 


68 


48 


70 


252 




55 


37 


45 


86 


223 


787 


168 


152 


129 


184 


633 




38 


27 


31 


58 


154 


787 


97 


93 


76 


107 


373 




57 


55 


60 


64 


236 




52 


31 


24 


71 


178 


787 



191 



TREASURER, VOTE FOR ONE 

Shannon P. O'Brien 
Blanks 



135 123 108 152 518 
71 56 52 90 269 787 



AUDITOR, VOTE FOR ONE 












A. Joseph DeNucci 




148 


135 


112 


156 551 


Blanks 




58 


44 


48 


86 .236 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS, VOTE 












FOR ONE 












John J. Moakley 


] 


149 


142 


117 


177 585 


Dennis J. Ingalls 




38 


23 


32 


32 125 


Blanks 




19 


14 


11 


33 11 


COUNCILLOR, VOTE FOR ONE 












Howard M. Kahalas 




21 


19 


19 


24 74 


William R. Buckley 




18 


24 


12 


21 75 


William F. Butters 




22 


18 


20 


16 76 


Thomas F. Cavanaugh 




22 


20 


17 


18 77 


J. Joseph Lydon 


40 


21 


29 


33 


123 


Daniel P. Matthews 


20 


17 


10 


25 


72 


Kelly A. Timilty 


22 


17 


13 


28 


80 


Blanks 


50 


43 


40 


77 


210 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT, VOTE 












FOR ONE 












William R. Keating 


140 


127 


115 


141 


523 


Blanks 


66 


52 


45 


101 


264 



787 



787 



787 



787 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 
VOTE FOR ONE 
John H. Rogers 
Blanks 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY, VOTE FOR ONE 
William D. Delahunt 
Blanks 

CLERK OF COURTS, VOTE FOR ONE 
Nicholas Barbadoro 
Blanks 

REGISTRAR OF DEEDS, VOTE FOR ONE 
Barry T. Harmon 
Blanks 





131 


109 




240 




48 


51 




_99 


144 


134 


122 


161 


561 


62 


45 


38 


81 


226 


131 


114 


103 


146 


494 


75 


65 


57 


96 


293 


131 


120 


107 


143 


501 


75 


59 


53 


99 


286 



339 



787 



787 



787 



192 



PRECINCT 

1 2 3 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER, VOTE FOR ONE 

Peter H. Collins 40 

Edward Milano 44 

Matthias J. Mulvey 19 

Thomas J. Reynolds 39 

Blanks 64 57 62 95 787 



REPUBLICAN BALLOTS 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS, VOTE FOR ONE 



48 


30 


49 


167 


36 


26 


39 


145 


9 


16 


18 


62 


29 


26 


41 


135 


57 


62 


95 


278 



John R. Lakian 
W. Mitt Romney 
Blanks 


25 

182 

2 


22 
214 

5 


20 

186 

6 


22 

219 

4 


89 

801 

17 


GOVERNOR, VOTE FOR ONE 
William F. Weld 
Blanks 


178 
31 


217 
24 


191 

21 


221 
24 


807 
100 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, VOTE FOR ONE 

Argeo P. Cellucci 173 
Blanks 36 


208 
33 


185 

27 


215 
30 


781 

126 


ATTORNEY GENERAL, VOTE FOR ONE 
Janis M. Berry 
Guy Carbone 
Blanks 


130 
45 
34 


150 
55 
36 


121 
49 
42 


157 
42 
46 


558 
191 
158 


SECRETARY OF STATE, VOTE FOR ONE 
Arthur E. Chase 
Peter V. Forman 
Blanks 


78 
74 
57 


91 

100 

50 


73 
79 
60 


99 
90 
56 


341 
343 
223 


TREASURER, VOTE FOR ONE 
Joseph D. Malone 
Blanks 


174 
35 


208 
33 


177 
35 


203 
42 


762 
145 


AUDITOR, VOTE FOR ONE 

Forrester A. "Tim" Clark, Jr. 

Earle B. Stroll 

Blanks 


91 
56 
62 


113 
70 
58 


97 
51 
64 


122 
52 
71 


423 
229 

255 



907 



907 



907 



907 



907 



907 



907 



193 



PRECINCTS 



TOTAL 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS, VOTE 
FOR ONE 
Robert D. Hall, Jr. 
Michael Murphy 
Blanks 

COUNCILLOR, VOTE FOR ONE 
Jerry Vengrow 
Blanks 



114 


131 


113 


133 


491 


57 


71 


49 


64 


241 


38 


39 


50 


48 


175 


130 


161 


129 


156 


576 


79 


80 


83 


89 


331 



907 



907 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT, VOTE 

FOR ONE 

Christopher M. Lane 
Blanks 



166 201 166 207 740 
43 40 46 38 167 



907 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 
VOTE FOR ONE 



Robert H. Sullivan 
Blanks 


155 
54 






178 
67 


333 
121 


Pentski 
Blanks 




176 
65 


141 
71 




317 
137 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY, VOTE FOR ONE 
Blanks 


209 


241 


212 


245 




CLERK OF COURTS, VOTE FOR ONE 
Michael H. Mushnick 
Blanks 


124 
85 


154 
87 


128 
84 


159 
86 


565 

342 


REGISTER OF DEEDS, VOTE FOR ONE 
Blanks 


209 


241 


212 


245 




COUNTY COMMISSIONER, VOTE FOR 

ONE 
Bruce D. Olsen 
Blanks 


126 
83 


162 

79 


131 
81 


159 
86 


578 

329 



454 



454 



907 



907 



907 



907 



The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

Ballot counters were: Mabellel Maguire, Priscilla Anderson, Anna Murphy, Sadie Carson! 
Nancy Franke, Emmy Mitchell, Joan Bussow, Marshall Chick, Katherine Buchanan, Frances 
Colella, Dorothea Gaughean, Elizabeth Lordon, Elmer Portman, Wlton Bassett, Gail Rad 
Ralph Parmigian, Eva Grover, Jessie Portman, Helen Reinhard, Clifford G. Doucette, Nancy 
Preston, C.B. Doub. 

194 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MICHAEL J. CONNOLLY, SECRETARY 

NOVEMBER 8, 1994 

Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said county, greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of said town who are qualified to vote in elections to meet at the MEMORIAL SCHOOL in 
said Medfield, on TUESDAY, THE EIGHTH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 1994, FROM 6:00a.m. 
to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates of political parties for the following 
offices: 

U.S. SENATOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

GOVERNOR AND LT. GOVERNOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

ATTORNEY GENERAL FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

SECRETARY FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

TREASURER FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

AUDITOR FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 9th Congressional District 

COUNCILLOR 2nd Councillor District 

SENATOR IN THE GENERAL COURT.... Norfolk, Bristol, & Plymouth District 
REPRESENTATIVE IN THE GENERAL COURT.... Thirteenth Norfolk District 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY Norfolk District 

CLERK OF COURTS Norfolk County 

REGISTER OF DEEDS Norfolk County 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER. Norfolk County 

COUNTY CHARTER COMMISSION Plymouth County 

QUESTIONS 

#1 - Regulating Spending on Ballot Question Campaigns 

#2 - Seat Belt Law 

#3 - Changing the Law Regarding Student Fees 

#4 - Term Limits 

#5 - Opening of Retail Stores on Sunday Mornings and Certain Holidays 

#6 - Graduated Income Tax 

$7 - Personal Income Tax Changes 

#8 - State Highway Fund Changes 

#9 - Prohibiting Rent Control 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place 

of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 25th day of October 1994. 



195 



S/ Ann B. Thompson, Chairman 
S/ Tidal B. Henry, Clerk 
S/ John T. Harney, Clerk 

SELECTMEN OF: MEDFIELD 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, 
qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, by posting 
attested copies of said warrant in not less than five public places in the Town of Medfield it 
least seven days before the time of holding the meeting. 



A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 
/s/Nancy J. Preston, TOWN CLERK 



/S/ KEVIN W. ROBINSON, Constable 



October 25, 1994 



196 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
STATE ELECTION 
NOVEMBER 8, 1994 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 a.m. with the reading of the 
warrant, and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were inspected 
and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was displayed and 
instruction to the voters posted. 

CHECKERS: Priscilla Anderson, Sadie Carson, Beverly Hallowell, Marshall Chick, Katherine 
Buchanan, Gail Rad, Anna Murphy, and Emmy Mitchell. 

BALLOT COUNTERS: Mabelle Maguire, Priscilla Anderson, Sadie Carson, Anna Murphy, 
Nancy Franke, Emmy Mitchell, Joan Bussow, Marshall Chick, Beverly Hallowell, Katherine 
Buchanan, Dorothea Gaughran, Elizabeth Lordan, Elton Bassett, Gail Rad, Patricia Rioux, 
Anna Floser, Clara Doub, Eva Grover, Georgia Colivas, Ronald Rioux, Jessie Portman, Nancy 
Preston, Elmer Portman, Nancy Hinkley, Gerald Doucette, Helen Reinhardt, Kathleen Lee, 
Claire Bouin, Ruth Brewer, Gertrude Albertson, Cecilia Haney , David Sutton, Ann Mentzer, 
George Mentzer, Ralph Parmigiare, Scott Bassett, Debra L. Roman, and Kenneth Balcom.. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 p.m. 

The total vote was 5,400. There are registered voters. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the resuslts were as follows: 



TOTAL 





PRECINCT 


1 


2 3 4 


UNITED STATES SENATOR, VOTE FOR ONE 




Edward M. Kennedy 


2524 


W. Mitt Romney 


2800 


Lauraleigh Dozier 


21 


William A. Ferguson, Jr. 


4 


Blanks 


51 



5400 

GOVERNOR/LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, VOTE FOR ONE 

Weld and Cellucci 4252 

Roosevelt and Massie 1042 

Cook and Crawford 16 

Rebello and Giske 5 

Blanks 85 5400 

ATTORNEY GENERAL, VOTE FOR ONE 

L. Scott Harshbarger 3564 

JanisM. Berry 1657 

Blanks 5400 

SECRETARY OF STATE, VOTE FOR ONE 

Arthur E. Chase 2462 

197 



William Francis Galvin 


2282 


Peter C. Everett 


138 


Blanks 


518 


TREASURER, VOTE FOR ONE 




Joseph D. Malone 


4008 


Shannon P. O'Brien 


1038 


Susan B. Polin 


51 


Thomas P. Tierney 


101 


Blanks 


202 


AUDITOR, VOTE FOR ONE 




A Joseph Denucci 


3270 


Forrest A. Clarks, Jr. 


1592 


Geoff M. Weil 


76 


Blanks 


462 



COUNCILLOR, VOTE FOR ONE 




Kelly Timilty 


2184 


Jerry Vengrow 


2147 


Steven B. Drobnis 


170 


Blanks 


899 



Lida E. Harkins 
Robert H. Sullivan 
Blanks 


4284 

1022 

94 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY, VOTE FOR ONE 
William D. Delahunt 
Blanks 


3772 
1628 



5400 



5400 



5400 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS, VOTE FOR ONE 
John J. Moakley 2738 

Michael M. Murphy 2347 

Blanks 315 5400 



5400 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT, VOTE FOR ONE 

William R. Keating 1749 

Christopher M. Lane 3405 

Blanks 246 5400 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

VOTE FOR ONE 



5400 



5400 



CLERK OF COURTS, VOTE FOR ONE 

Nicholas Barbadoro 1852 

Michael H. Mushnick 2735 
Blanks 813 5400 

REGISTER OF DEEDS, VOTE FOR ONE 

198 



Barry T. Hannon 3057 

Ronald J. Smith 1068 

Blanks 1275 5400 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER, VOTE FOR ONE 

Bruce D. Olsen 2844 

Peter H. Collins 1560 

Blanks 996 5400 



QUESTION 1 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 
YES 1870 

NO 3295 

BLANKS 235 5400 

QUESTION 2 REFERENDUM ON AN EXISTING LAW 
YES 3793 

NO 1509 

BLANKS 98 5400 

QUESTION 3 REFERENDUM ON AN EXISTING LAW 

YES 2811 

NO 2135 

BLANKS 454 5400 

QUESTION 4 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 
YES 2662 

NO 2471 

BLANKS 267 5400 

QUESTION 5 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 
YES 2905 

NO 2370 

BLANKS 125 5400 



QUESTION 6 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE 
PETITION 

YES 1297 

NO 3985 

BLANKS 163 5400 

QUESTION 7 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

YES 1225 

NO 3895 

BLANKS 190 5400 



199 



QUESTION 8 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

YES 4028 

NO 310 

BLANKS 199 5400 

QUESTION 9 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

YES 2974 

NO 2116 

BLANKS 310 5400 



The polls were closed at 8:00 p.m. After the results were announced, the ballots, checked 
voting lists and tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed 
by law. 

A TRUCOPY ATTEST: 



/s/ Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



200 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1994 



201 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



COMPAI 


IATIVE FINANCIAL REPORTS 




1993, 1994, 1995 




1993 






Class Parcel Count 


Valuation 


1) Residential 


3544 


$711,068,427.00 


2) Open Space 


175 


3,923,350.00 


3) Commercial 


145 


33,233,050.00 


4) Industrial 


39 


23,212,000.00 


5) Personal Property 


141 


7,772,400.00 


Total Real and Personal 


4044 


779,209,227.00 


Tax Levy 




11,368,706.40 


Overlay 




100,108.40 


Tax Rate per thousand all classes 




14.59 


1994 






1) Residential 


3669 


725,801,850.00 


2) Open Space 


176 


3,425,550.00 


3) Commercial 


145 


31,877,700.00 


4) Industrial 


50 


23,234,200.00 


5) Personal Property 


132 


7,806,200.00 


Total Real and Personal 


4173 


792,145,500.00 


Tax Levy 




12,199,040.00 


Overlay 




95,520.70 


Tax Rate per thousand all classes 


15.40 


1995 






1 ) Residential 


3718 


837,940,100.00 


2) Open Space 


160 


3,898,300.00 


3) Commercial 


155 


30,502,825.00 


4) Industrial 


52 


21,286,950.00 


5) Personal Property 


173 


10,893,500.00 


Total Real and Personal 


4258 


904,521,675.00 


Tax Levy 




12,916,569.52 


Overlay 




156,872.00 


Tax Rate per thousand all classes 


14.28 



202 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 
Taxes Receivable as of June 30. 



Fiscal Year 


Real Estate 


Personal ProDertv 


Excise Tax 


1994 


$206,138.27 


$1,137.77 


$40,941.37 


1993 


112,142.95 


2,559.39 


12,610.18 


Prior Years 


5,585.41 


804.25 


39,695.33 


TOTAL 


$323,866.63 


$4,501.41 


$93,246.88 


Tax Title 




$61,013.90 




Taxes in Litigation 




25,601.00 




Water Rates 




$109,831.45 




Sewer Rates 




96,033.95 




ADDED TO TAXES: 








Septic 




$538.68 




Water & Sewer Liens 




8,295.49 




Apportioned Betterments 


1,034.21 




Committed Interest 




895.90 





Respectfully submitted, 



Robert G. Stokes 
Tax Collector 



203 



TOWN TREASURER 

TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

Funds in Custody of Town Treasurer 

Retirement/Pension $1 ,500,455.42 

Conservation 25,897.14 

Stabilization 256,568.16 

Group Health Insurance 66,691 .01 

Special Unemployment Insurance 154,472.58 

Library Trusts 12,993.55 

Granville Dailey - Library 74,366.60 

Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 12,933.13 

Municipal Insurance 178,369.97 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship 106,900.20 

Council on Aging 3,305.68 

Palumbo Sports Fund 2,590.69 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 394,975.96 

Moses Ellis Post #1 1 7 G . A,R. 7,820.35 

Medfield Antiquities Trust 3,843.82 

Tri-Centennial Trust 1 ,81 1 .68 

Madelyn L. Grant Library Fund 40,728.25 

School Essay Fund 2,959.01 

Pilgrim Health Care Fund 1 6,693. 1 1 

Allendale Pumping Station Fund 39,708.57 

Dela Park Acres Trust 1 0,000.00 

Balance June 30, 1994 $2,914,084.88 



The foregoing is a record of cash, investments, interest earned, trust funds and 
outstanding debts for fiscal year ended June 30, 1994. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert G. Stokes . 
Town Treasurer/Collector 



204 



TOWN TREASURER 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Residents of Medfleld: 

STATEMENT OF CASH 

Receipts Fiscal 1 994 - 

including investment returns $20,555,223.67 

Disbursements Fiscal 1 994 - 

including reinvestments 21,121,995.13 

Cash in Banks June 30, 1994 $7,879,878.83 

STATEMENT OF INVESTMENTS 
Pooled Investment Fund 
Investments June 30, 1994 751.890.42 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments - 
June 30, 1994 $8,631,769.25 



STATEMENT OF INTEREST RECEIVED ON SAVINGS/INVESTMENTS 

General Fund $248,099.71 

Pooled Investment Fund 26,745.73 

Total Interest Received Fiscal 1994 $274,845.44 



Outside Debt Limit: 



OUTSTANDING DEBT ACCOUNTS 
June 30. 1994 



$5,330,000.00 



Aquifer Land Acquisition $500,000.00 

Town Land Acquisition 280,000.00 

School Construction 4,550,000.00 

Inside Debt Limit: 

Refuse Transfer Station $200,000.00 

Sewers - Pine Needle Park 1 ,920,000.00 

2.120.000.00 

Net Funded or Fixed Debt Balance $7,450,000.00 



205 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
BALANCE SHEET 
JUNE 30, 1994 



GENERAL FUND 



DEBIT 



CREDIT 



Cash $5,158,444 

Investment of Available Funds 1,979,647 
Total Cash & Available Funds 



$7,138,091 



Personal Property 
Current Year 
Prior Years 



1,137 
6,779 



Real Estate 
Current Year 
Prior Years 
Prepaid Taxes 



205,086 

196,964 





Other Taxes 
Forestry 
Recreation 



(96) 




206 



7,916 



402,050 



TOTAL TAXES 



(96) 
409,870 



Provision for Abatements & Exemptions 
Current Year 
Prior Years 



$ 11,000 
84,273 



Reserve for Uncollected Taxes 



317,015 
412,288 



Tax Liens Receivable 

Reserve for Uncollected Tax Liens 



806 



806 



Taxes in Litigation Receivable 
Reserve for Taxes in Litigation 

Deferred Taxes Receivable 
Reserve for Deferred Taxes 



25,601 



7,818 



25,601 



7,818 



Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 
Current Year 
Prior Years 



Reserve for Uncollected Excise Tax 



40,941 
52,291 

93,232 



93,232 



Departmental Receivables: 
Ambulance $ 78,986 

Reserve for Unc . Departmental Rec $ 78,986 

Unapportioned Betterments Added to Tax: 

Water 2,016 

Sewer 443 

Committed Interest 6,823 



9,282 
Reserve for Betterments Added to Tax 9,282 

Amount to be Provided for Accrued Sick 

Leave 470,469 

Agency Payables : 

Teachers' Retirement Withholding (1,013) 

Life Insurance Withholdings 4,555 

Add'l Voluntary Life Ins. Withholding 1,87 9 

Health Insurance Withholdings 24,947 

Annuity and Deferred Comp. Withholding Payable 11,698 

Medicare Withholding Payable (967) 



41,099 

Tailings (Unclaimed Items) 

Warrants Payable 53,190 

Guarantee Deposits 7,500 

Accrued Sick Leave 470,469 

Treasurer/Collectors' Tax Title 18,688 

Reserved Fund Balances : 

Fund Bal . Res . for Approp . 

Snow/Ice Deficit 123,733 

Reserve for Over (Under) Assessments 1,801 

Reserve for Encumbrances : 

Pine Needle Park Sewer Construction 602,734 

Special Warrant Articles 4,709,329 

Budget Escrow Accounts 118,775 

Reserve for Planned Budget Deficit (FY95) 648,314 



TOTAL RESERVED FUND BALANCES 6,080,953 

Unreserved Fund Balance 1,057,976 



GENERAL FUND TOTALS $8,357,888 $8,357,888 



207 



SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 

Cash and Investments 

Federal : 
Ambulance 

Total Federal 



State: 

Public Works - Highway up Front 

Chapter 90 - Highway 

Arts Lottery 

Elderly Grants 

Library Collection Devel. Grant 

Youth Advisory Grant 

Library Grants 

DARE 

Hurricane Bob 

Drug Education Grant - Police 

School : 

Chapter I ECIA 

Title VIB (94-142) 

Title VIB Early Childhood 

Chapter II ECIA 

School Improvement 

D. Eisenhower Grant 

Horace Mann Grant 

Governor Alliance Dare 

School/Police Dare Tobacco Grant 

SPED SPRIG Grant 

Total State 



Revolving: 

School Tuition 
School Lunch 
H.S. Project and Plans 
Memorial School Rents 
School Custodian Detail 
Adult Education 
School Athletics 
Park & Recreation 
Police Detail 
College Night 
Fire Alarm Fees 
Ambulance Mileage Fees 
Tax Refund IRS 
Kennel Fee Revolving 
Pilgrim Self-Insured 

Total Revolving 

208 



$ 


750,495 




508 




508 









3,395 




3,983 




1,133 




1,699 




54 




17,017 




1,832 




79,306 




765 









7,607 




1,365 




122 




2,454 




2,247 




1 




3 




20,102 




1,055 




144,140 




30,411 




35,862 




3,043 




(1,262) 




3,813 




7,976 




7,079 




16,217 




34,594 









730 




9,068 




3,744 




51 




312,056 




$ 463,382 



Reserved for Appropriation: 
Perpetual Care 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 

Total Reserved for Appropriation 
Other Special Revenue: 

Gift Accounts 

Fine Arts 

Oxbow Water System Study 

Theatre Fund 

Conservation Fee Account 

Special Investigation Fund 

Cable Access 

Premium/Interest Accrued on Loans 

Fire Revolving 

Insurance Reimb < $10,000 

Bay State Gas School Gift 

Backflow Test Fees 

Bella/Pine St. Busing 



Total Other Special Revenue 
SPECIAL REVENUE TOTALS 
TRUST FUNDS 



$ 750,495 



$ 7,015 
73,135 

80,150 

31,226 

8,022 

(2,906) 

1,126 

12,810 

950 

100 

12,274 

5 

850 

2,266 

(4,410) 

2 

62,315 

$ 750,495 



Cash and Investments 



$2, 875,670 



In Custody of the Treasurer: 
Pension 
Conservation 
Stabilization 

Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 
Library Trusts 
Granville Daily Library 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Special Unemployment Insurance 
Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship 
Council On Aging 
Palumbo Sports 
Municipal Insurance 
Group Health Insurance 
Pilgrim Health Trust 
Library Income Expendable 
Cemetery Perpetual Care Expendable 
Moses Ellis Post G.A.R. 
Antiquities 
Tricentennial 
Madelyn L. Grant 
Essay Fund 

Allendale Sewer Trust 
Dela Park Acres 



1,455 

33 

202 

12 

12 

76 

395 

141 

102 

3 

3 

173 

66 

78 

7 

5 

8 

3 

1 

39 

2 

39 

10 



,254 
,973 
,612 
,880 
,086 
,966 
,350 
,179 
,802 
,279 
,415 
,825 
,018 
,256 
,137 
,035 
,112 
,823 
,786 
,184 
,934 
,764 
,000 



Trust Fund Totals 
TOTAL FUND BALANCES 



2,875,670 
$11,860,320 



2,875,670 
$11,860,320 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Georgia K. Colivas, Town Accountant 

209 



WATER ENTERPRISE FUND F95 
ESTIMATED REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 



WATER ENTERPRISE REVENUES 4 AVAILABLE FUNDS 
User charges $666,300 



TOTAL WATER REVENUES 

TOTAL COSTS APPROPRIATED: 

COSTS APPROPRIATED IN THE ENTERPRISE FUND 
Water Department Budget 140-00 

Personnel $ 

Operations 

Reserve fund: 

for painting Mt . Nebo water tower 
for South st. water main repl . 
for water truck 
for High St. water main extension 

Sub- total Water Department 
Debt Service: 

Principal 150-01 I 

Interest 150-02 



$ 666,300 



155,670 
217,945 

26,000 
30,000 
20,000 
50,000 



50, 000 



$ 499,615 



Sub- total Debt Service $ 50,000 

ALLOCATED EXPENSES: 

Services from Other Departments 

Insurance 155-00 $ 29,117 

Pensions 161-00 20,131 

Shared employees 63,177 

Shared facilities 4,260 

Sub- total allocated expenses $ 116,685 

ESTIMATED TOTAL EXPENSES: $ 666,300 

ESTIMATED WATER FUND SURPLUS (DEFICIT) $ 

CALCULATION OF GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 

Enterprise fund revenues & available funds $ 666,300 

Less: Total costs (666,300) 

Less : Prior year deficit 

General Fund Subsidy $ 

SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS APPROPRIATED IN THE ENTERPRISE FUND 

Enterprise fund revenues and available funds $ 666,300 

Taxation 

Free Cash 

Non-enterprise available funds 

TOTAL SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS 

APPROPRIATED IN ENTERPRISE FUND: $ 666,300 



WATER ENTERPRISE RATE STRUCTURE: 
FOR SIX MONTHS: MINIMUM 

0-35,000 gal 

35, 001-70,000 gal 

70, 001 and over 



$15.00 

$ 1.44/1, 000 gallons 
$ 2 .30/1, 000 gallons 
$ 3 .30/1, 000 gallons 



210 



SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND F95 
ESTIMATED REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 

SEWER ENTERPRISE REVENUES i AYAILAEIE RUSTS: 

$ 489,000 



User charges 

TOTAL SEWER REVENUES 

TOTAL COSTS APPROPRIATED: 

COSTS APPROPRIATED IN Tr.l Z:~Z???.ZSZ FUND 
Sewer Department 3udget 131-00 
Personnel 
Operations 



142 312 



$ 489,000 



Sub-total Sewer Derar:: 



$263,500 



Debt Service: 

Principal 150-01 
Interest 150-02 

Sub-total Debt Service 

ALLOCATED EXPENSES : 

Services from Other Eepart-er.i = 
Insurance 15 5-00 
Pensions 161-00 
Shared employees 
Shared facilities 



2 5 e:e 

23,397 
63,177 

2 ::i 



Sub-tota! 



allccated expenses 



3125,400 



est::-'_-.7ii TOTAL KIPKHSKS 

ESTIMATED SEWER FUND SURPLUS (DEFICIT 

CALCULATION OF GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 

Enterprise fund revenues i available funds 
Less: Total costs 
Less: Prior year deficit 

General Fund Subsidv 



$ 489,000 
$ 



3 489,000 

(489,000! 





SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS APPROPRIATES IB 7Y.Z ENTERPRISE FUND 

Enterprise fund revenues and available fur.ds $ 489,000 

Taxation 

Free Cash 

Non-enterprise available funds 



TOTAL SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR CCSTS 
APPROPRIATED IN ENTERPRISE FUND: 



$ 489,000 



SEWER ENTERPRISE RATE STRUCTURE: 

HOUSEHOLD : 75% of water consumption at $3 . 70/ thousand gallons 

COMMERCIAL: 100% of water consumption at $3 . 70/ thousand gallons 
SEPTIC DUMPING: $110 . 00/thousand aallons dumped 



211 



WATER AND SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 

ESTABLISHED JULY 1, 1991 (FISCAL YEAR 1992) UNDER 

MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL LAWS, CHAPTER 40, 

SECTION 39K 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1994 

WATER 



TOTAL SERVICES 


3,350 


ADDED SERVICES 


104 


THOUSAND GALLONS PUMPED 


424,912,000 


THOUSAND GALLONS SOLD 


403,000,000 



WATER APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES $698,4 1 5 

RETAINED EARNINGS - RESERVED 

(AS OF 6/30/94) 276,991 
RETAINED EARNINGS - UNRESERVED 

(AS OF 6/30/94) 266.665 

$543.656 

SEWER 

TOTAL SERVICES 1,185 

ADDED SERVICES 43 

SEWER APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES $563,893 

DEBT SERVICE 

RETAINED EARNINGS - UNRESERVED 

(AS OF 6/30/94) $193.562 



212 



CONTRACTS FOR PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



Department 

Baud 


XymQia 


Amgyni 


Stanley Bergeron 


Real Estate appraisal 
Consultant 


$43/hour 


Municipal Computer 
Services 


Printing tax bills, $ 1 5,430 

commitment books, master 

report lists and computerized equalization 

program. 


Carlson Survey Co. 


Correcting and updating 
assessor's maps. 


$5/Parcel 

$2/Lot 


Health 
William R Domey 


Consultant Sanitary 
Engineer/ Agent for the 
Board of Health 


$19,000 


Walpole Visiting Nurse 
Association, Walpole, MA 


Responsible for all Public 
Health nursing needs and 
communicable disease follow-ups 
and statistics. 


$ 8,230 


Banning 
Whitman & Howard 


Assistance in reviewing 
subdivision plans, site plans 
and other engineering services. 


$80/hour 


Selectmen 

Tucci & Roselli 

Certified Public Accountants 


Fiscal Audit 


$6,000 


Town Clerk 
L.H.S. Associates 
Dundee Park 


Street Listing and Voter 
Census by Mail 


$.40/nam< 



213 



PERPETUAL CARE 



Muriel A. Carr $ 350 

Helen Mills 350 

Jack A. Petersen 700 

Linda Carmel 1,400 

Terese A. Cummins 700 

William H. and Mary Jane Carter 1,400 

Irene Bates 350 

Philip J. Morgan 700 

Priscilla Flynn 350 

Robert E. Alger 1,400 

Doris Dick 1,400 

Dana M. Sumner & Donald Shippey 1,400 

David G. and Josephine C. Nowers 700 

Jeannine E. Adams 3,500 

Gwendolyn Skillin 2,800 

J. Dixon Bergman 350 

James J. Flynn 1,050 

PaulL. Sauliner 1,400 

Carol Picardi and Grace Sessler 1,400 

Susan C. Connelly 350 

Elizabeth J. Guglielmo 700 

Nancy C. Kashalena 1,400 

Edwin J. and Virginia Kinter 1,400 

Beverly M. Fowle 350 

John W. Vestute 1,400 

^eter J. White 350 

GRAND TOTAL $ 27,650 



214 



INDEX 

Page 
Town Officers Elected 7 

APPOINTMENTS BY: 

Board of Selectmen , 9 

Assessors 19 

Town Accountant 19 

Town Clerk 19 

Fire Chief 19 

Board of Health 19 

Moderator 19 

Planning Board 20 

Treasurer/Collector 20 

DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Aging, Council on 44 

Ambulance Department 36 

Animal Control Officer/Inspector 38 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 45 

Arts Council 47 

Assessors, Board of 46 

Cable Television Committee 48 

Community Cable Access Corp 49 

Cemetery Commissioners 91 

Civil Defense Department 50 

Conservation Commission 51 

Fire Department 40 

Health, Board of 53 

Historical Commission 59 

Historical District Commission 62 

Housing Authority 64 

Inspection Department 65 

Kingsbury Pond Committee 68 

Library Trustees 74 

Long Range Planning Committee 70 

Memorials, Committee to Study 78 

Memorial Public Library 72 

Memorial Day Address 76 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 82 

Mosquito Control, Norfolk County 81 

Park and Recreation Commission 84 

Planning Board 86 

Police Department '. . 33 

Public Works, Superintendent 29 

Recycling Committee 88 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 91 

Selectmen, Board of 24 

Tree and Insect Pest Control 96 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School 92 

Veterans' Services 87 

Water and Sewerage Board 97 

Youth Advisory Commission 99 



215 



Page 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

School Committee 102 

Superintendent of Schools 106 

Assistant Superintendent 108 

Amos Clark Kingsbury High School Ill 

Graduation Exercises, High School 113 

Thomas A. Blake Middle School 117 

Dale Street School. . 121 

Ralph Wheelock School 124 

Memorial School 127 

Report of the Pupil Services Department 129 

Athletic Director 133 

Adult Education Program 132 

Food Service Director 138 

Director of Plant Management 140 



TOWN CLERK'S RECORDS: 

Births 143 

Deaths 154 

Marriages 151 



TOWN MEETINGS AND ELECTIONS: 

Annual Town Election, March 28, 1994 159 

Warrant and Proceedings, Annual Town Meeting 

April 25, 1994 161 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Primary 

September 20, 1994 190 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Election 

November 8, 1994 195 



FINANCIAL REPORTS: 

Assessors' Report 202 

Collector 203 

Contracts for Professional Services 213 

Perpetual Care 214 

Town Accountant 206 

Treasurer 204 

Water and Sewer Department 210 



216